June 30, 2014

Boehner: Immigration Reform Is Off The Table This Year; Obama Threatens Constitutional Crisis
— Ace


Posted by: Ace at 09:08 AM | Comments (283)
Post contains 51 words, total size 1 kb.

Boehner: Immigration Reform Is Off The Table This Year; Obama Threatens Constitutional Crisis
— Ace


Posted by: Ace at 09:08 AM | Comments (283)
Post contains 51 words, total size 1 kb.

Israeli Army Finds the Bodies of Three Kidnapped Teenagers, Murdered, Near Homes of Kidnapping Suspects
— Ace

Now confirmed by the government.

Just a short while ago it was merely feared:


Sources from Al Jazeera and Abc said that the bodies were found near Hebron, the city where two suspects in the case -- Marwan Qawasmeh and Amer Abu Aisha -- lived.

...

Israeli officials have convened an emergency security cabinet meeting at 9.30 pm local time, amid new details in the ongoing search for the three teens with a statement from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu expected afterwards.

Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) sent in troops in the Hebron area and set up roadblocks around the city, following the new developments in the investigation.

...

Sixteen-year-olds Naftali Frenkel, Gilad Shaar and 19-year-old Eyal Yifrach disappeared while hitchhiking at night from the Jewish settlement of Gush Etzion.

The time of death is believed to be at about the same time as the teenagers went missing:


One of the three teenagers, Naftali Frenkel, was a US citizen.

Posted by: Ace at 08:30 AM | Comments (269)
Post contains 216 words, total size 2 kb.

Israeli Army Finds the Bodies of Three Kidnapped Teenagers, Murdered, Near Homes of Kidnapping Suspects
— Ace

Now confirmed by the government.

Just a short while ago it was merely feared:


Sources from Al Jazeera and Abc said that the bodies were found near Hebron, the city where two suspects in the case -- Marwan Qawasmeh and Amer Abu Aisha -- lived.

...

Israeli officials have convened an emergency security cabinet meeting at 9.30 pm local time, amid new details in the ongoing search for the three teens with a statement from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu expected afterwards.

Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) sent in troops in the Hebron area and set up roadblocks around the city, following the new developments in the investigation.

...

Sixteen-year-olds Naftali Frenkel, Gilad Shaar and 19-year-old Eyal Yifrach disappeared while hitchhiking at night from the Jewish settlement of Gush Etzion.

The time of death is believed to be at about the same time as the teenagers went missing:


One of the three teenagers, Naftali Frenkel, was a US citizen.

Posted by: Ace at 08:30 AM | Comments (269)
Post contains 216 words, total size 2 kb.

Israeli Army Finds the Bodies of Three Kidnapped Teenagers, Murdered, Near Homes of Kidnapping Suspects
— Ace

Now confirmed by the government.

Just a short while ago it was merely feared:


Sources from Al Jazeera and Abc said that the bodies were found near Hebron, the city where two suspects in the case -- Marwan Qawasmeh and Amer Abu Aisha -- lived.

...

Israeli officials have convened an emergency security cabinet meeting at 9.30 pm local time, amid new details in the ongoing search for the three teens with a statement from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu expected afterwards.

Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) sent in troops in the Hebron area and set up roadblocks around the city, following the new developments in the investigation.

...

Sixteen-year-olds Naftali Frenkel, Gilad Shaar and 19-year-old Eyal Yifrach disappeared while hitchhiking at night from the Jewish settlement of Gush Etzion.

The time of death is believed to be at about the same time as the teenagers went missing:


One of the three teenagers, Naftali Frenkel, was a US citizen.

Posted by: Ace at 08:30 AM | Comments (538)
Post contains 216 words, total size 2 kb.

A Black Guy Named "Clinton Tucker" is Suing Benjamin Moore Paints for Selling a Paint with the "Racially Offensive" Name "Tucker Chocolate"
— Ace

The name "Tucker Chocolate" has nothing at all to do with him, of course. In 1798, a guy named St. George Tucker requested a particular shade of brown for his house. Benjamin Moore says their "Tucker Chocolate" recaptures that hue.

This guy, who formerly worked for Benjamin Moore, says that's "racially offensive," because his own name is Tucker. He is further outraged that they also market a color called "Clinton Brown," because that's his first name. He further says that when he brought up this outrage to coworkers, they thought "it" was funny.

I think they thought his crackpot conspiracy theories and sue-iness was funny.

But as they say: If only one man is offended...

Posted by: Ace at 07:13 AM | Comments (434)
Post contains 159 words, total size 1 kb.

A Black Guy Named "Clinton Tucker" is Suing Benjamin Moore Paints for Selling a Paint with the "Racially Offensive" Name "Tucker Chocolate"
— Ace

The name "Tucker Chocolate" has nothing at all to do with him, of course. In 1798, a guy named St. George Tucker requested a particular shade of brown for his house. Benjamin Moore says their "Tucker Chocolate" recaptures that hue.

This guy, who formerly worked for Benjamin Moore, says that's "racially offensive," because his own name is Tucker. He is further outraged that they also market a color called "Clinton Brown," because that's his first name. He further says that when he brought up this outrage to coworkers, they thought "it" was funny.

I think they thought his crackpot conspiracy theories and sue-iness was funny.

But as they say: If only one man is offended...

Posted by: Ace at 07:13 AM | Comments (434)
Post contains 159 words, total size 1 kb.

A Black Guy Named "Clinton Tucker" is Suing Benjamin Moore Paints for Selling a Paint with the "Racially Offensive" Name "Tucker Chocolate"
— Ace

The name "Tucker Chocolate" has nothing at all to do with him, of course. In 1798, a guy named St. George Tucker requested a particular shade of brown for his house. Benjamin Moore says their "Tucker Chocolate" recaptures that hue.

This guy, who formerly worked for Benjamin Moore, says that's "racially offensive," because his own name is Tucker. He is further outraged that they also market a color called "Clinton Brown," because that's his first name. He further says that when he brought up this outrage to coworkers, they thought "it" was funny.

I think they thought his crackpot conspiracy theories and sue-iness was funny.

But as they say: If only one man is offended...

Posted by: Ace at 07:13 AM | Comments (868)
Post contains 159 words, total size 1 kb.

Supreme Court Decision Day - Harris and Hobby Lobby
— Gabriel Malor

Whew, what a crazy last few weeks at the Supreme Court. Finishing the term, the Supreme Court has issued decisions in Harris v. Quinn and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, both of which are by J. Alito.

In Harris, the Supreme Court held, in a 5-4 decision by Justice Alito that "partial public employees" like the home healthcare aides here may not be compelled to pay union fees to a union they do not want to support. This is a limited loss for unions, but it does not sweep away prior precedent allowing compelled fees for normal public employees. That will have to wait on another case, oh, like a couple coming up out of California that are now pending at the 9th Cir.

That decision is here (PDF).

In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court held that "closely held corporations" like the for-profit corporations here cannot be compelled under RFRA to provide contraception coverage in violation of their religious beliefs. This is another narrow, but crucial victory.

That decision is here (PDF).

I'll have more on these decisions in a bit. more...

Posted by: Gabriel Malor at 05:21 AM | Comments (442)
Post contains 358 words, total size 3 kb.

Supreme Court Decision Day - Harris and Hobby Lobby
— Gabriel Malor

Whew, what a crazy last few weeks at the Supreme Court. Finishing the term, the Supreme Court has issued decisions in Harris v. Quinn and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, both of which are by J. Alito.

In Harris, the Supreme Court held, in a 5-4 decision by Justice Alito that "partial public employees" like the home healthcare aides here may not be compelled to pay union fees to a union they do not want to support. This is a limited loss for unions, but it does not sweep away prior precedent allowing compelled fees for normal public employees. That will have to wait on another case, oh, like a couple coming up out of California that are now pending at the 9th Cir.

That decision is here (PDF).

In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court held that "closely held corporations" like the for-profit corporations here cannot be compelled under RFRA to provide contraception coverage in violation of their religious beliefs. This is another narrow, but crucial victory.

That decision is here (PDF).

I'll have more on these decisions in a bit. more...

Posted by: Gabriel Malor at 05:21 AM | Comments (442)
Post contains 358 words, total size 3 kb.

Supreme Court Decision Day - Harris and Hobby Lobby
— Gabriel Malor

Whew, what a crazy last few weeks at the Supreme Court. Finishing the term, the Supreme Court has issued decisions in Harris v. Quinn and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, both of which are by J. Alito.

In Harris, the Supreme Court held, in a 5-4 decision by Justice Alito that "partial public employees" like the home healthcare aides here may not be compelled to pay union fees to a union they do not want to support. This is a limited loss for unions, but it does not sweep away prior precedent allowing compelled fees for normal public employees. That will have to wait on another case, oh, like a couple coming up out of California that are now pending at the 9th Cir.

That decision is here (PDF).

In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court held that "closely held corporations" like the for-profit corporations here cannot be compelled under RFRA to provide contraception coverage in violation of their religious beliefs. This is another narrow, but crucial victory.

That decision is here (PDF).

I'll have more on these decisions in a bit. more...

Posted by: Gabriel Malor at 05:21 AM | Comments (442)
Post contains 358 words, total size 3 kb.

Supreme Court Decision Day - Harris and Hobby Lobby
— Gabriel Malor

Whew, what a crazy last few weeks at the Supreme Court. Finishing the term, the Supreme Court has issued decisions in Harris v. Quinn and Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, both of which are by J. Alito.

In Harris, the Supreme Court held, in a 5-4 decision by Justice Alito that "partial public employees" like the home healthcare aides here may not be compelled to pay union fees to a union they do not want to support. This is a limited loss for unions, but it does not sweep away prior precedent allowing compelled fees for normal public employees. That will have to wait on another case, oh, like a couple coming up out of California that are now pending at the 9th Cir.

That decision is here (PDF).

In Hobby Lobby, the Supreme Court held that "closely held corporations" like the for-profit corporations here cannot be compelled under RFRA to provide contraception coverage in violation of their religious beliefs. This is another narrow, but crucial victory.

That decision is here (PDF).

I'll have more on these decisions in a bit. more...

Posted by: Gabriel Malor at 05:21 AM | Comments (442)
Post contains 358 words, total size 3 kb.

The problem of debt
— Monty

"The only man who sticks closer to you in adversity than a friend is a creditor." -- Anonymous

Robert Samuelson has a piece up on RCM today talking about a proposal by the Bank of International Settlements (BIS) for governments to move away from traditional business-cycle centric monetary policy and towards a "financial-cycle" monetary policy. It's an interesting idea, but Samuelson lays out the basic problem:

All this will prompt pushback. Mainstream economics still commands the intellectual heights. How can we ignore the business cycle? Optimism - consumers' and firms' willingness to spend - presumes that governments respond to economic weakness. This seems especially relevant now with a fragile global economy. Even if we agree with the BIS, do we have the tools to adopt its advice? Within limits, debt is desirable. It aids economic expansion and allows families and firms to invest in the future. Do we know when debt is "excessive"?

Before we start talking about debt, I want to define what debt is, at a conceptual level. Basically, debt is a mechanism whereby I can pay for present expenses or purchases with future earnings (and that includes things like building factories or hiring more workers). And since money I haven't earned yet doesn't exist (which is to say that the value has not yet been created), I have to use someone else's money, and they'll charge me a premium to do so. Why? Because a creditor incurs a cost by loaning me the money. If I have the money, the creditor doesn't have it, and thus they can't use it for their own purposes. Interest is the price we put on the opportunity costs incurred by loaning money.
more...

Posted by: Monty at 04:00 AM | Comments (303)
Post contains 931 words, total size 6 kb.

The problem of debt
— Monty

"The only man who sticks closer to you in adversity than a friend is a creditor." -- Anonymous

Robert Samuelson has a piece up on RCM today talking about a proposal by the Bank of International Settlements (BIS) for governments to move away from traditional business-cycle centric monetary policy and towards a "financial-cycle" monetary policy. It's an interesting idea, but Samuelson lays out the basic problem:

All this will prompt pushback. Mainstream economics still commands the intellectual heights. How can we ignore the business cycle? Optimism - consumers' and firms' willingness to spend - presumes that governments respond to economic weakness. This seems especially relevant now with a fragile global economy. Even if we agree with the BIS, do we have the tools to adopt its advice? Within limits, debt is desirable. It aids economic expansion and allows families and firms to invest in the future. Do we know when debt is "excessive"?

Before we start talking about debt, I want to define what debt is, at a conceptual level. Basically, debt is a mechanism whereby I can pay for present expenses or purchases with future earnings (and that includes things like building factories or hiring more workers). And since money I haven't earned yet doesn't exist (which is to say that the value has not yet been created), I have to use someone else's money, and they'll charge me a premium to do so. Why? Because a creditor incurs a cost by loaning me the money. If I have the money, the creditor doesn't have it, and thus they can't use it for their own purposes. Interest is the price we put on the opportunity costs incurred by loaning money.
more...

Posted by: Monty at 04:00 AM | Comments (303)
Post contains 931 words, total size 6 kb.

The problem of debt
— Monty

"The only man who sticks closer to you in adversity than a friend is a creditor." -- Anonymous

Robert Samuelson has a piece up on RCM today talking about a proposal by the Bank of International Settlements (BIS) for governments to move away from traditional business-cycle centric monetary policy and towards a "financial-cycle" monetary policy. It's an interesting idea, but Samuelson lays out the basic problem:

All this will prompt pushback. Mainstream economics still commands the intellectual heights. How can we ignore the business cycle? Optimism - consumers' and firms' willingness to spend - presumes that governments respond to economic weakness. This seems especially relevant now with a fragile global economy. Even if we agree with the BIS, do we have the tools to adopt its advice? Within limits, debt is desirable. It aids economic expansion and allows families and firms to invest in the future. Do we know when debt is "excessive"?

Before we start talking about debt, I want to define what debt is, at a conceptual level. Basically, debt is a mechanism whereby I can pay for present expenses or purchases with future earnings (and that includes things like building factories or hiring more workers). And since money I haven't earned yet doesn't exist (which is to say that the value has not yet been created), I have to use someone else's money, and they'll charge me a premium to do so. Why? Because a creditor incurs a cost by loaning me the money. If I have the money, the creditor doesn't have it, and thus they can't use it for their own purposes. Interest is the price we put on the opportunity costs incurred by loaning money.
more...

Posted by: Monty at 04:00 AM | Comments (303)
Post contains 931 words, total size 6 kb.

The problem of debt
— Monty

"The only man who sticks closer to you in adversity than a friend is a creditor." -- Anonymous

Robert Samuelson has a piece up on RCM today talking about a proposal by the Bank of International Settlements (BIS) for governments to move away from traditional business-cycle centric monetary policy and towards a "financial-cycle" monetary policy. It's an interesting idea, but Samuelson lays out the basic problem:

All this will prompt pushback. Mainstream economics still commands the intellectual heights. How can we ignore the business cycle? Optimism - consumers' and firms' willingness to spend - presumes that governments respond to economic weakness. This seems especially relevant now with a fragile global economy. Even if we agree with the BIS, do we have the tools to adopt its advice? Within limits, debt is desirable. It aids economic expansion and allows families and firms to invest in the future. Do we know when debt is "excessive"?

Before we start talking about debt, I want to define what debt is, at a conceptual level. Basically, debt is a mechanism whereby I can pay for present expenses or purchases with future earnings (and that includes things like building factories or hiring more workers). And since money I haven't earned yet doesn't exist (which is to say that the value has not yet been created), I have to use someone else's money, and they'll charge me a premium to do so. Why? Because a creditor incurs a cost by loaning me the money. If I have the money, the creditor doesn't have it, and thus they can't use it for their own purposes. Interest is the price we put on the opportunity costs incurred by loaning money.
more...

Posted by: Monty at 04:00 AM | Comments (303)
Post contains 931 words, total size 6 kb.

Top Headline Comments 6-30-14
— Gabriel Malor

Big Day.

At 10am, the Supreme Court will announce decisions in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby and Harris v. Quinn. I covered the legal arguments in Hobby Lobby here and the lies media told (and will tell if Hobby Lobby wins today) here. For info on Harris, see my write up here and this piece at Politico.

This story about the Clintons reads a lot like fiction, but isn't labeled as such. It certainly has a truthy flavor, if this similar though not as lurid piece at Politico is any indication. And it appears that Clinton's "wealth problem" is far from over.

Americans, please stop playing tourist in North Korea.


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Posted by: Gabriel Malor at 01:47 AM | Comments (420)
Post contains 130 words, total size 2 kb.

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