October 31, 2014

Virgin's "SpaceShipTwo" Crashes During Test Flight In Mojave Desert; One Pilot Dead, The Other With Serious Injuries
— Ace


They're calling the mishap a "serious anomaly." A Fox affiliate, KABC, has helicopter pictures of the rocket glider crashed in the scrub of the Mojave. The pieces of the glider are all within yards of each other, so the ship was intact until it the ground.


One parachute was observed descending towards the earth near the crash. A while ago, someone tweeted:


Shep Smith has just updated to report that one pilot has in fact died, and that the other is injured.

Picture of what appears to be a red parachute on the desert ground is here at KABC 7.

Just updated: the rocket exploded upon ignition. The way the rocket glider works is this: It is ferried up to high altitude (around 50,000 feet) by a plane called "White Knight." White Knight brings the glider up, drops it, and then the glider ignites its own rockets to make it to orbit.

Apparently the rockets exploded upon ignition.

I can't wait 'til Shep starts lecturing us about not panicking.

More: From the Blaze, some video of the crash site.

Posted by: Ace at 09:57 AM | Comments (316)
Post contains 277 words, total size 3 kb.

1 Sad and terrible. prayers to all involved.

Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 09:52 AM (K4YiS)

2 What zombie said.

Posted by: fluffy at October 31, 2014 09:52 AM (Ua6T/)

3 Maybe it's time to rethink the unnecessary space flights just for fun" economic model. As the last week have proven twice: Space flight is still extremely dangerous.

Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 09:53 AM (K4YiS)

4 Horrible.

Posted by: The Political Hat at October 31, 2014 09:54 AM (lN8KC)

5 Getting news that a person survived a spaceship crash is just incredible in itself.

Godspeed.

Posted by: Chupacabras at October 31, 2014 09:54 AM (W2YA6)

6 Was a bad week for spaceflight

Posted by: tinfoil baby at October 31, 2014 09:55 AM (hqVUe)

7 They're calling the mishap a "serious anomaly."

*jawdrop*   Ya think?

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 09:55 AM (evdj2)

8 I'm not done talking about lawyers/. http://tinyurl.com/qjvuyuh

Posted by: The Great White Snark at October 31, 2014 09:55 AM (XUKZU)

9 It'll always be a dangerous venture.

Posted by: --- at October 31, 2014 09:55 AM (MMC8r)

10 Shep Smith cautioned viewers that since the beginning of time people have dies, so this is nothing to panic about.

Posted by: Lizzy at October 31, 2014 09:55 AM (D/504)

11 Wasn't us. Swearsies.

Posted by: Haliburton who contracts out to NASA at October 31, 2014 09:56 AM (XzRw1)

12 First the accident at Wallops.  And now this.

http://www.prazen.com/cori/highflit.html

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 09:56 AM (pQOKS)

13 Koch brothers!

Posted by: Harry Reid, Pederast at October 31, 2014 09:56 AM (0FSuD)

14 This is sad. A reminder of how risky this can be.

Posted by: Lizzy at October 31, 2014 09:56 AM (D/504)

15 Shep Smith cautioned viewers that since the beginning of time people have dies, so this is nothing to panic about. Also CANNIBALiSM!!

Posted by: --- at October 31, 2014 09:56 AM (MMC8r)

16 Respect and gratitude for those who undergo such great risk to move humanity forward.

Posted by: weew at October 31, 2014 09:56 AM (0tmLY)

17 Remember that scene from "2001: A Space Odyssey" wit the Pan Am stewardesses floating around a commercial passenger space flight? Yeah, that was supposed to be happening already as of 13 years ago. At this rate, it'll be another 100 years at least. And by then there will be a 25-year jail sentence for even saying the word "stewardess."

Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 09:56 AM (K4YiS)

18 We can rebuild him. We have the technology.

Posted by: Clown-Sized Face Spiders That Are Definitely Not in AtC's Closet at October 31, 2014 09:57 AM (knoK7)

19 Don't panic. Your chances of dying in a spaceship crash are incredibly small.

Posted by: Shep Smith at October 31, 2014 09:57 AM (pbr7X)

20 Prayers to the survivor (if so) and families of the brave soul(s) lost. Pioneers take risks; may we remember their sacrifices and continue their work.

Posted by: Brother Cavil at October 31, 2014 09:57 AM (rt3TY)

21 @3 - almost anything that's advanced the human condition has been extremely dangerous at some point, until the perseverance of the people prepared to accept the risk made it reasonably safe for everyone else. Fifty years on, it's still the best advice one could give: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jiZZ0IJL2_w

Posted by: JEM at October 31, 2014 09:57 AM (o+SC1)

22 This is inevitable. I hope it doesn't stop them. Rockets and space flight are dangerous. I like it when billionaires do crazy cool stuff like build their own spaceships. Especially compared to what Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has done with his billions -- buy the Democrat Party and try to ram Amnesty down America's throats. Billionaires doing crazy dangerous cool stuff? Ok. Billionaires trying to buy control of the country and force me to bend a knee -- go fuck yourself.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 09:57 AM (ZPrif)

23 As a matter of fact, yes, it is indeed rocket science.

Posted by: weft cut-loop[/i] [/b] at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (k1nNw)

24 Speaking of Wallops, NBC tried blaming that accident on cutting NASA funding so the vastly inferior civilians have to be contracted. And we all know private companies do worse than bureaucrats.

Posted by: Chupacabras at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (W2YA6)

25 {sigh} What next?

Posted by: creeper at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (I0nPY)

26 Thank god there were no little boys on the plane.

Posted by: Harry Reid, Pederast at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (0FSuD)

27 In many ways the story of SpaceShipTwo is the story of Obama.

Posted by: Super Creepy Rob Lowe at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (oDCMR)

28 We can rebuild him. We have the technology. Posted by: Clown-Sized Face Spiders That Are Definitely Not in AtC's Closet Alright, time to stop this crap.

Posted by: Goliath Birdeader with enough armor and gear to pass for a Tachikoma at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (rt3TY)

29 Read somewhere else that they switched the material in the rocket engine. ?They switched it from rubber based to plastic based rocket fuel?

Posted by: rd at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (J7NUM)

30

Pic of SpaceShipTwo docked with White Knight Two on the ground:

 

http://abcn.ws/1u1CK61

 

(ABC News)

 

Awesome looking vehicle.  Darn shame about the pilot.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 09:58 AM (JtwS4)

31 Off, arachnid sock!

Posted by: RedMindBlueState at October 31, 2014 09:59 AM (knoK7)

32 >>> Maybe it's time to rethink the unnecessary space flights just for fun" economic model. nonsense. it's no one's business what risks a man chooses to voluntarily court. Furthermore -- not that a furthermore is needed -- but the true commercialization of spaceflight will be a boon, once it's accomplished. Space tourism is an early step towards that.

Posted by: ace at October 31, 2014 09:59 AM (/FnUH)

33 Canada Denies Science!!! Breaking News @BreakingNews Canada suspends visa applications for residents of countries battling Ebola outbreak - @CdnPress http://bit.ly/1rH5sCq

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 09:59 AM (ZPrif)

34 Again, I was not consulted.

Posted by: NDT at October 31, 2014 09:59 AM (XzRw1)

35 Prayers to the survivor (if so) and families of the brave soul(s) lost. Pioneers take risks; may we remember their sacrifices and continue their work. Amen.

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 09:59 AM (5ic5a)

36 17 Remember that scene from "2001: A Space Odyssey" wit the Pan Am stewardesses floating around a commercial passenger space flight? ------- Muslims have dropped the ball somewhat on aerospace technology in the last 500 years.

Posted by: NASA at October 31, 2014 09:59 AM (pbr7X)

37 Just updated: the rocket exploded upon ignition ***** Coincidence? I really think they should have cancelled it--given the previous incident.

Posted by: Your friendly Danube River Guide at October 31, 2014 10:00 AM (RJMhd)

38 Can I be the new Space Czar now!

Posted by: The New Ebola Czar Extraordinaire at October 31, 2014 10:00 AM (m0le6)

39 Damn.

Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 10:00 AM (dcY7v)

40 God bless those heroes

One day common man will slip the surly  bonds of this rock

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:00 AM (/4AZU)

41 WATCH ME READ TWEETS! LIVE! ON THE TV!!

Posted by: Shep Smith at October 31, 2014 10:00 AM (ZPrif)

42 - _ - The risks of flight test. Maybe it's time to rethink the unnecessary space flights just for fun" economic model. As the last week have proven twice: Space flight is still extremely dangerous. Time proven axiom: Nothing ventured, nothing gained. It will never not be dangerous.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Suntanning in Bizzaro World at October 31, 2014 10:00 AM (vZe08)

43 When things start exploding, you're no longer a Virgin. just sayin.

They may want to come up with a new name. Maybe "Moll Non-Galactic?

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 10:01 AM (GGCsk)

44 41 WATCH ME READ TWEETS! LIVE! ON THE TV!!

Posted by: Shep Smith at October 31, 2014 03:00 PM (ZPrif)


Someone needs to send you to the Moon.


Posted by: Thin veneer of civility at October 31, 2014 10:01 AM (XzRw1)

45 Serious, though, the news really is reduced to reading Virgin Galactic's twitter on giant iPads.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:01 AM (ZPrif)

46 Coincidence? I would think it had to be, I doubt the systems are the same.

Posted by: --- at October 31, 2014 10:01 AM (MMC8r)

47 >> it's no one's business what risks a man chooses to voluntarily court.
Furthermore -- not that a furthermore is needed -- but the true commercialization of spaceflight will be a boon, once it's accomplished.

Yes! I hope they keep trying. I like that this is being done privately.

Posted by: Lizzy at October 31, 2014 10:01 AM (D/504)

48 42 Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Suntanning in Bizzaro World at October 31, 2014 03:00 PM (vZe0

Atmospheric aviation went through the same growing pains....

and likely wouldn't have survived the modern litigious model.

Man needs to go up

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:02 AM (/4AZU)

49 Shep, bringing the smarts to TV



"The question is exactly what happen"



You don't say?  Damn, that never occurred to me.

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 31, 2014 10:02 AM (0FSuD)

50 >>As the last week have proven twice: Space flight is still extremely dangerous I saw an article the other day and it quoted Elon Musk in an interview he gave about a year ago regarding Orbital Science, the company that launched the rocket that exploded the other day. He said their design was "a joke" because among other things the engine that they were using was a 50 year old Russian engine. Not a 50 year old Russian design, an actual engine that was built in Russia 50 years ago. I think I'll pass on going for a ride in that design.

Posted by: JackStraw at October 31, 2014 10:02 AM (g1DWB)

51 @Costanza

That's what they've been doing for years with AP, why change now?

Posted by: Chupacabras at October 31, 2014 10:02 AM (W2YA6)

52 Background rumours: Virgin Galactic has always had problems with their engine systems, which were first outsourced to some weird company, and then taken in house after a previous accident that claimed the life of another employee.

They are using a temperamental hybrid engine system which has dubious benefits.

There are other companies (competitors) that are using much more tried and true engine systems (X-COR for example), but for some stubborn reason, Virgin/Scaled has stuck to this weird hybrid engine.

It has always been an accident waiting to happen.

Posted by: WTF at October 31, 2014 10:02 AM (dhgmu)

53 The original motor could run for 20 seconds.  And an earlier ground test with just Nitrous Oxide caused a motor to explode and kill three from shrapnel.  The new solid rocket fuel is plastic based and has run for 60 seconds on the ground.

If I am to believe Wikipedia.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:02 AM (pQOKS)

54

It will never not be dangerous.

 

No, and the guys who gravitate to it have a certain mentality.  "Auguring in", as they called it in The Right Stuff is part of that business.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 10:03 AM (JtwS4)

55 When I hear about this on the news, I'm going to be mighty pissed.

Posted by: Teh Won at October 31, 2014 10:03 AM (7ObY1)

56 Thank God we can rely on Putin for manned space flight. AmIright?

Posted by: Super Creepy Rob Lowe at October 31, 2014 10:03 AM (oDCMR)

57 The number of men who died establishing workable air flight are uncountable.

Posted by: --- at October 31, 2014 10:03 AM (MMC8r)

58 nonsense. it's no one's business what risks a man chooses to voluntarily court. Furthermore -- not that a furthermore is needed -- but the true commercialization of spaceflight will be a boon, once it's accomplished. Space tourism is an early step towards that. Posted by: ace I'm not saying that brave indiviaulas or forward thinking rich dudes should refrain from being adventurous. I'm saying that this is obviously "not ready for prime time," and that there must be a long proven track record of safety before taking space flights can be viewed as something "tourists" can do -- which is what Branson's plan was. The Hindenberg Disaster essentially brought an end to the zeppelin era, because it proved that the concept was not yet safe. I feel the same is true here. For now. Got up the safety quotient to "extremely reliable" before unveiling ti as a public service.

Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 10:03 AM (K4YiS)

59 Canada Denies Science!!! Breaking News @BreakingNews Canada suspends visa applications for residents of countries battling Ebola outbreak - Buncha hosers.

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 10:03 AM (5ic5a)

60 Remember Ace's post yesterday about Ebola and sneezing? The information has disappeared from the CDC web-site today. Huffpo http://tinyurl.com/kkbn3xd

Posted by: rd at October 31, 2014 10:04 AM (J7NUM)

61 Hell, we still have problems just keeping ferry boats from sinking and drowning people.

Posted by: Roy at October 31, 2014 10:04 AM (VndSC)

62 The one that blew up at Wallops Is. was using 60's era russian engines.

Posted by: wrg500 at October 31, 2014 10:04 AM (sWgE+)

63 "This is a setback for Virgin Galactic's space program." *curtsies*

Posted by: Shep Smith Lays Some Insight On You at October 31, 2014 10:05 AM (pbr7X)

64
Bless these people and their families. 

I remain amazed that rocketry is still tricky in 2014, it seems that that would be perfectly perfected in engineering but its not.

Posted by: Guy Mohawk at October 31, 2014 10:05 AM (1nB6R)

65 54 Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 03:03 PM (JtwS4)

This is your pilot, we've lost the #1,3 and 4 engines and will be landing shortly.....


//Going Yeager

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:05 AM (/4AZU)

66 I thought John Bonham's death brought an end to the Zeppelin era.

Posted by: Guy Who Always Misses the Point at October 31, 2014 10:05 AM (7ObY1)

67 Yeah, it's just that with twitter it's even more obvious that they have no more access to information than we do. With AP stories they don't just go to the AP website and read it. I still find it really funny that Shep literally just puts Virgin's twitter feed on a giant screen and reads it to for the home audience. It's just so comically lame.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:06 AM (ZPrif)

68 From Rickl, the NASA discussion thread on the Antares failure at Wallop and its AJ-26 engines.  Remember Elon is also sucking hard on the government teat..

http://tinyurl.com/p9vxzfo

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:06 AM (pQOKS)

69 This is Shep 'OMG!!' Smith, reporting from Starship Foxnews

Posted by: A dude in MI at October 31, 2014 10:06 AM (o2Jt2)

70 58 Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 03:03 PM (K4YiS)

Fokker Tri-Motors killed Knute Rockne with glue and wood.

I'd go Zombie, but I would.

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:06 AM (/4AZU)

71 How about the first man who sailed out of sight of land? If we lose this drive, we will lose everything else that makes us unique.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 31, 2014 10:06 AM (Zu3d9)

72 If an explosion on ignition is an "in-flight anomaly", then a case of Ebola is the "sniffles".

Posted by: Roy at October 31, 2014 10:07 AM (VndSC)

73 The Hindenberg Disaster essentially brought an end to the zeppelin era, because it proved that the concept was not yet safe. I feel the same is true here. --------- The concept was safe. The hydrogen wasn't.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at October 31, 2014 10:07 AM (pbr7X)

74 God bless their families.

Posted by: alexthechick - Commence drinking now. at October 31, 2014 10:07 AM (mf5HN)

75 >>Space tourism is an early step towards that.<<

Really? What the practical economic model? Because I am not seeing it.

There is probably a short-term model for the "thrill" of it with a very small group who can afford the costs. But beyond that it doesn't seem sustainable.

I'm not anti-science or anti -risk taking for the purpose of advancement. But I simply don't believe its feasible, based on today's technology, to create an enterprise that is eventually self-sustaining.

That doesn't mean they should stop. Branson can keep burning his money for a dream. But I just don't see the venture as anything but a bunch of wishes without a feasible, positive ans sustainable outcome at this point.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 10:07 AM (GGCsk)

76 If an explosion on ignition is an "in-flight anomaly", then a case of Ebola is the "sniffles".

The rocket engine's performance was sub-optimal.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:08 AM (evdj2)

77 The first mr. creeper, may he RIP, was a pilot. I inherited a poster from him. It's a picture of a Jenny in a tree, with the following above it: "Aviation in itself, is not inherently dangerous. But to an even greater degree than the sea, it is terribly unforgiving of any carelessness, incapacity or neglect." Enjoy your final flight, captain. May there be some consolation in having died doing what you loved.

Posted by: creeper at October 31, 2014 10:08 AM (I0nPY)

78 How about the first man who sailed out of sight of land? Don't tell anyone, but I was just trying to get away from the wife for a bit.

Posted by: that guy who first sailed out of sight of land at October 31, 2014 10:08 AM (ColVC)

79 The concept was safe. The hydrogen wasn't. Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) So, Branson needs to stop using ACME rockets.

Posted by: Roy at October 31, 2014 10:08 AM (VndSC)

80 Rockets are phallic objects driven and built by MEN!!! and should explode.

Posted by: Niaomi Wolf at October 31, 2014 10:08 AM (XzRw1)

81 I would pay $25K to go into space.  That's the price point for a once-in-a-lifetime experience for me.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (evdj2)

82 "in-flight anomaly" A nice way of saying ooops, we fcuked up.

Posted by: wrg500 at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (sWgE+)

83 Was Shep in tears? Any cannibalism going on out there?

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian, let's bungle in the jungle at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (b5BZa)

84 75 >>Space tourism is an early step towards that.<< Really? What the practical economic model? Because I am not seeing it. There is probably a short-term model for the "thrill" of it with a very small group who can afford the costs. But beyond that it doesn't seem sustainable. I'm not anti-science or anti -risk taking for the purpose of advancement. But I simply don't believe its feasible, based on today's technology, to create an enterprise that is eventually self-sustaining. That doesn't mean they should stop. Branson can keep burning his money for a dream. But I just don't see the venture as anything but a bunch of wishes without a feasible, positive ans sustainable outcome at this point. ------------------------------ Do you know how many people pay good hard cash to climb Everest every year? There is a market for such things.

Posted by: Super Creepy Rob Lowe at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (oDCMR)

85 71 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at October 31, 2014 03:06 PM (Zu3d9)

It makes the global warming hysteria look funny....

Mankind has at most ~4 billion years left then the sun will "warm globally" when it Red Giants and swallows us...

I'd prefer we bald monkeys have folks off rock

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (/4AZU)

86 29 Read somewhere else that they switched the material in the rocket engine. ?They switched it from rubber based to plastic based rocket fuel? Posted by: rd at October 31, 2014 02:58 PM (J7NUM) That sounds plausible. I know they had proven the rubber fuel design numerous times. I thought the design was pretty robust. Changing to a different (probably higher energy) fuel could explain why something went wrong when they ignited it at altitude.

Posted by: D-Lamp at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (txvbW)

87 3 Maybe it's time to rethink the unnecessary space flights just for fun" economic model. As the last week have proven twice: Space flight is still extremely dangerous. Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 02:53 PM (K4YiS) Ok I rethought it. Let'em fly.

Posted by: Bob from table9 at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (WNERA)

88 80 Rockets are phallic objects driven and built by MEN!!! and should explode. Posted by: Niaomi Wolf --------------------------------- Schadenboner One! Come in, Schadenboner One! I think we lost him.

Posted by: Roy at October 31, 2014 10:09 AM (VndSC)

89 And now we are veering off into 'Is it worth it?"

I am out of here.  The ones who argued "Is it worth" in the past stayed in Europe while everyone with gumption set sail for the New World.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:10 AM (pQOKS)

90 >>Really? What the practical economic model? Because I am not seeing it. Branson has a pretty good track record of making a boat load of money on his investments. If he's willing to put his millions behind this I got to believe he has done the math.

Posted by: JackStraw at October 31, 2014 10:11 AM (g1DWB)

91 75 Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 03:07 PM (GGCsk)

Virgin could act as a taxi to get people up to solar sailers in orbit....

we are going to need a cheap way to get people to a permanent orbital station to leapfrog men and equipment to the Moon...

a commercial mars shot becomes feasible from Luna or orbit...

I don't see a model that works lifting from Earth

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:11 AM (/4AZU)

92 Atmospheric aviation went through the same growing pains....
and likely wouldn't have survived the modern litigious model.


Hell, the whole industrial age never would have happened if they'd been as sue-happy as 21st-century Americans.

Posted by: HR, cleverly disguised as a sexy software engineer at October 31, 2014 10:11 AM (/kI1Q)

93 Any one catch Debbie Wasserman Shorts calling Obama "Obola" during her debate with Reince Priebus the other day?

Posted by: Special Comments Correspondent at October 31, 2014 10:11 AM (t4SgY)

94 Actually sven, at most 500 million years. The sun gets steadily hotter before the final red-giant phase.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 31, 2014 10:11 AM (WxXqb)

95 The concept was safe. The hydrogen wasn't. Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) But that's exactly what I mean. Nowadays we can extract helium pretty cheap and easily make non-explodive zeppelins. But do we? No. Which is kind of odd, really. The same is true for rocketry. With the right design and fuel and so forth, it "works." But we must sttle on an ultra-safe consistent method before putting random passengers from the general public on these flights. Especially since, as with the Virgin model, the flights don't actually take you anywhere -- they're just for "fun." Would you ride rollercoaster if there was a 10% you die in a crash? No.

Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 10:12 AM (K4YiS)

96 Kaci Hickox has demanded to donate blood to aid the injured pilot.

Posted by: Gristle Encased Head at October 31, 2014 10:12 AM (+lsX1)

97 and likely wouldn't have survived the modern litigious model. If that ridiculously childish shit existed in 1960, I doubt we would have ever gotten into orbit. Man needs to go up Posted by: sven10077@sven10077 at October 31, 2014 03:02 PM (/4AZU) To say the least....

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Suntanning in Bizzaro World at October 31, 2014 10:12 AM (vZe08)

98 Rockets are phallic objects driven and built by MEN!!! and should explode. Posted by: Niaomi Wolf And how!

Posted by: Hugh Hefner at October 31, 2014 10:12 AM (lN8KC)

99 Here's a cool idea I wish some billionaire would fund. Only like 5-10% of cardiac arrests patients survive cause if your heart isn't restarted within a few minutes, you're dead. Solution: Defib Drones. Flies straight to patient, probably to their cell phone, instructs bystanders how to use it. Future tech could apply the defib itself, but just getting it there in a few minutes and letting family, friends, and bystanders do it could save tons of lives. The Defibrillator Drone Is Another Good Drone Idea But Will It Work? - IEEE Spectrum http://bit.ly/1u1RFNA via @IEEESpectrum

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:12 AM (ZPrif)

100 Mankind has at most ~4 billion years left then the sun will "warm globally" when it Red Giants and swallows us... If they can't do it in 3.75 billion years. maybe it's for the best?

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 10:13 AM (5ic5a)

101 augering in: from the tool the auger

Posted by: m at October 31, 2014 10:13 AM (clmNP)

102 89 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 03:10 PM (pQOKS)

the current civil service would never have allowed America to be colonized...

we live in an insane asylum Ms. Puma

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:13 AM (/4AZU)

103 Would you ride rollercoaster if there was a 10% you die in a crash? No ----------------------- Hells yeah.

Posted by: Snowflake's boyfriend at October 31, 2014 10:13 AM (VndSC)

104 Posted by: WTF at October 31, 2014 03:02 PM (dhgmu) Innovation involves trying something new. Most innovations fail, but eventually one may succeed, and the field advances. If you never try ...

Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 10:13 AM (dcY7v)

105 100 Posted by: rickb223 at October 31, 2014 03:13 PM (5ic5a)

quite...

if we can't figure out we are supposed to keep growing we deserve to be forgotten by the stars

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:14 AM (/4AZU)

106 54 It will never not be dangerous. No, and the guys who gravitate to it have a certain mentality. "Auguring in", as they called it in The Right Stuff is part of that business. Posted by: Bandersnatch at October There is risk in just about everything. Space flight is the next avenue to be explored. God bless the families involved

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian, let's bungle in the jungle at October 31, 2014 10:14 AM (b5BZa)

107 "The question is exactly what happen"


Shep

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 31, 2014 10:14 AM (0FSuD)

108 Why is WD-40 called WD-40?

The previous 39 attempts failed.  But they kept trying and found a winner.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:14 AM (pQOKS)

109 @33 Canada suspends visa applications for residents of countries battling Ebola outbreak - @CdnPress http://bit.ly/1rH5sCq -------------------- Just another couple of weeks, and the US will be the only country that isn't banning travel from the Ebola-stricken African nations...

Posted by: junior at October 31, 2014 10:14 AM (UWFpX)

110 94 Actually sven, at most 500 million years. The sun gets steadily hotter before the final red-giant phase. ____________________________________________ OMG, OMG proof of global warming. ***runs around with hair on fire***

Posted by: al gore at October 31, 2014 10:14 AM (WNERA)

111 @79 - it wasn't just the Hindenburg, it was the Akron and the Macon and the R101 and a few others that proved that even if you filled them with helium (on which the US had an effective monopoly) large airships were still too vulnerable to weather to be commercially viable. Then WWII came along and pushed heavier-than-air aircraft design along beyond any airship.

Posted by: JEM at October 31, 2014 10:14 AM (o+SC1)

112

Nowadays we can extract helium pretty cheap and easily make non-explodive zeppelins.

But do we? No. Which is kind of odd, really.

 

 

Well at the time of the Hidenburgh Germany was ban by terms of thier WW1 surrender from having helium. So the only option left to them was hydrogen.

Posted by: wrg500 at October 31, 2014 10:15 AM (sWgE+)

113 If it was a rollercoaster to outer space, and the tech was going to be used for further exploration, then I might.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 31, 2014 10:15 AM (WxXqb)

114 The space tourism will be a small, but significant, industry. Akin to mountain climbing and other extreme tourism. Real money is in asteroid mining and stuff -- that's a huge, huge leap beyond this space tourism stuff, but it's a step.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:15 AM (ZPrif)

115 Nowadays we can extract helium pretty cheap and easily make non-explodive zeppelins.

But do we? No. Which is kind of odd, really.


The Germans still do, although they don't seem to be using them for warfare.

Posted by: HR, cleverly disguised as a sexy software engineer at October 31, 2014 10:15 AM (/kI1Q)

116 Large Zeppelins are inherently unsafe due to their size.  They were so large, they would have different atmosphere conditions at the ends of the envelope.  The bow might be in a downdraft while the stern was in an updraft making control very problematic.  They were only reasonably safe in perfect weather.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:15 AM (evdj2)

117 Just curious - what happened to SpaceShipOne?

Posted by: Roy at October 31, 2014 10:16 AM (VndSC)

118 Is it crazy to consider that the first incident might have been caused by computer vulnerability ? Then you have the White House getting "hacked". I don't think it's far fetched to consider that commercial computers are vulnerable given the very competitive nature of the space industry. I don't think it would have been imprudent to hold off on this endeavor and others until you have it sorted out.

Posted by: Your friendly Danube River Guide at October 31, 2014 10:16 AM (RJMhd)

119 108 Why is WD-40 called WD-40?

The previous 39 attempts failed. But they kept trying and found a winner.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 03:14 PM (pQOKS)


WD stands for Water Displacement.  It is mostly mineral oil and fish oil.  Anna's right it was the 40th attempt

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 31, 2014 10:16 AM (0FSuD)

120 Nobody should do anything if something bad could happen or if the economic benefit isn't immediately obvious. That's just plain old common sense.

Posted by: Gristle Encased Head at October 31, 2014 10:16 AM (+lsX1)

121 and I see JEM made the same points.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:17 AM (evdj2)

122 94 Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 31, 2014 03:11 PM (WxXqb)

hey as long as the answer is "tax more folks so others get free shit" who cares?

//Liberals with a solution looking for a problem

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:17 AM (/4AZU)

123 There was an embargo on helium (usa stuff) to germany. This is why they had to use hydrogen. The lifting capabilities are nearly equal.

Posted by: al gore at October 31, 2014 10:17 AM (WNERA)

124 "Don't panic. Your chances of dying in a spaceship crash are incredibly small." Okay, if you're actually ON a spaceship they go up quite a bit.

Posted by: Tom Servo at October 31, 2014 10:17 AM (Kpl3J)

125 Regarding comments by zombie:

Won't the market be the best to decide if these flights are ready for prime time?  Maybe the satisfaction delivered to the participants is so amazing that it is worth the 10% fatality rate. 

And given that this is still in its very earliest stages, the rate will inevitably go down.

Also, this was a flight test of as yet un-proven hardware.  Unfortunately, this is what happens during flight tests.


Posted by: WTF at October 31, 2014 10:17 AM (dhgmu)

126 By ze terms of ze Treaty de Versailles, no German pig dog shall be permitted to be speaking in ze squeaky voice.

Posted by: georges clemenceau at October 31, 2014 10:17 AM (WxXqb)

127 Especially since, as with the Virgin model, the flights don't actually take you anywhere -- they're just for "fun." Would you ride rollercoaster if there was a 10% you die in a crash? No. Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 03:12 PM (K4YiS) I look at them as a stepping stone to the next stage. Low cost Orbit.

Posted by: D-Lamp at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (txvbW)

128 WD stands for Water Displacement. It is mostly mineral oil and fish oil. ------------ Always wondered why fisherman used it to scent artificial lures and it worked.

Posted by: Roy at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (VndSC)

129 The Germans still do, although they don't seem to be using them for warfare. Ze Amerikaneren vill never zee it komink...!

Posted by: Oberst von Bombast, Luftwaffe Airship Forces at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (rt3TY)

130 One of the "god-given freedoms" conservatives are so fond of citing is the right to risk your neck as you so choose, provided you do not risk anyone else's. Earlier this year I made a trip down the river in a driving gale. The waves were twice as high as my little dinghy and I got sandwiched between two towboats. Halfway home I came to the realization that I was probably going to die. I was reduced to hoping they'd find my body. But...I have never felt more alive in my life. When I made it back to shore safely, I was almost disappointed. I suspect many of the morons know this feeling.

Posted by: creeper at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (I0nPY)

131 In the 2000s there was a mini-resurgence in airship tech, seems to have advanced. But still failed. Too expensive, problems with weather, funding scrapped when Obama took over. Some cool designs for giant airship cargo vehicles. But airship tech advances quickly, then stalled for nearly a century. Tech doesn't always get better. Sometimes it quickly advances then stalls out.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (ZPrif)

132 I did like the aircraft career rigid airships.  Having no landing gear and storing the planes on a carousel was nifty.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (evdj2)

133 Especially since, as with the Virgin model, the flights don't actually take you anywhere -- they're just for "fun." So? People die climbing Everest pretty much every year. You going to tell them to stop because it isn't safe enough according to whatever metric you've selected?

Posted by: Generation Bubble Wrap at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (ColVC)

134 Clearly the Joos are behind this.

Posted by: Rev Al at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (0FSuD)

135 Just imagine the clean up cost from the alphabet agencies

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian, let's bungle in the jungle at October 31, 2014 10:18 AM (b5BZa)

136 The concept was safe. The hydrogen wasn't. I've heard it was the paint on the skin of the Hindenburg that was dangerous.

Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 10:19 AM (dcY7v)

137 One of their pilots is the British Top Gun test pilot, MaCay, I think, is his name.  That would be a huge loss.

But what about all those people saying how we should leave space to private business because they don't have failures?  Are they out today?

Posted by: Adjoran at October 31, 2014 10:19 AM (QIQ6j)

138 114 Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 03:15 PM (ZPrif)

the thrill tourism sector will subsidize cheap commercial lifting bodies for the trip to the asteroid belt CD....

Mankind needs dreams and growth....we have had way too little of both the last 20 years

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:19 AM (/4AZU)

139 Just curious - what happened to SpaceShipOne? Due for upgrade in #twoweeks. SpaceShipOne.One.Two

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 10:19 AM (5ic5a)

140 I knew a chick with large zeppelins once. They were sensitive to downdrafts and subject to the occasional lightning strike.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at October 31, 2014 10:19 AM (pbr7X)

141 Just curious - what happened to SpaceShipOne? Posted by: Roy Smaller proof-of-concept craft. SS2 was the next stage of development.

Posted by: Oberst von Bombast, Luftwaffe Airship Forces at October 31, 2014 10:19 AM (rt3TY)

142 Russia does have a strong interest in killing off the nascent private spaceflight industry.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (ZPrif)

143 "We do these things not because they are easy, but because they are hard."

--  something John F. Kennedy said about space.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (pQOKS)

144 But...I have never felt more alive in my life. When I made it back to shore safely, I was almost disappointed.

I suspect many of the morons know this feeling.

Posted by: creeper at October 31, 2014 03:18 PM (I0nPY)


Sort of like the time I also got laid!

Posted by: Hector at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (0FSuD)

145

Apparrently it works much like the X-15 worked, except with longer duration.

Clearly, enough testing was not done, unless it is a maintainence issue.

Posted by: maddogg at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (xWW96)

146 I've seen a few reports that both crew "ejected" before impact and that two chutes were observed.

I hadn't been aware that ejection seats were provisioned for SS2. They were not for SS1. Journomalists getting it wrong yet again?

And having looked at SS1 up close and personal, I couldn't see how a pilot could possibly manually egress the vehicle if it had departed controlled flight. The hatch placement wasn't suited to that.

Posted by: torquewrench at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (noWW6)

147 Rocket ships are racist.

Posted by: Spike Lee at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (XzRw1)

148 Off, lighter-than-air sock.

Posted by: Brother Cavil at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (rt3TY)

149 Sad about the deaths.

I remain concerned that at end times Shep may be the last person on tv I see and/or I will be forced to watch CNN. halp.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Detective of infectious disease czarina at October 31, 2014 10:20 AM (dMEBN)

150 I should have died with my crew... but now I'm going to do what I should have done in the first place... I'm going to ram this glider right down its throat ...

Posted by: Commodore Matt Decker at October 31, 2014 10:21 AM (aTXUx)

151 130 Posted by: creeper at October 31, 2014 03:18 PM (I0nPY)

Back in 2000-2002 when we were up in MD I went kayaking in a tropical swell on the Chesapeake....

I was pondering taking boy when wife said "I'll kill you if he is hurt"

She loved me enough to let me fight the 6-12 foot chop.....

I can risk me, but not him.

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:21 AM (/4AZU)

152 I've heard it was the paint on the skin of the Hindenburg that was dangerous.

Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 03:19 PM (dcY7v)


Static electricity.  They didn't ground it before it tried to dock

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 31, 2014 10:21 AM (0FSuD)

153 Obama has been a "serious anomaly" of a president.

Posted by: Dr Spank at October 31, 2014 10:21 AM (DESkV)

154 But airship tech advances quickly, then stalled for nearly a century. Tech doesn't always get better. Sometimes it quickly advances then stalls out. Needing nearly perfect weather every time is a bitch when you don't and can't control that variable.

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 10:22 AM (5ic5a)

155 I'm not anti-science or anti -risk taking for the purpose of advancement. But I simply don't believe its feasible, based on today's technology, to create an enterprise that is eventually self-sustaining. -- Part of the effort is advancing the technology beyond what we have now. You may be right, but I can imagine that pretty much the same thing was said about the prospect of air travel back in 1903.

Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 10:22 AM (dcY7v)

156 143 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 03:20 PM (pQOKS)

If the "because it is there" aspect of our psyche has been outgrown then mankind is still born.


Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:22 AM (/4AZU)

157 I actually doubt space tourism will help that much for deep space stuff. But it will help a little. It's the difference between a fishing boat and a deep sea submersible that can mine tons of minerals on the bottom of the ocean floor. Technically they both are in the ocean.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:23 AM (ZPrif)

158 @50 Not only was it an old Soviet rocket, it was a design the Russians abandoned because all four of their tests blew up

Posted by: t-bird at October 31, 2014 10:23 AM (6WlVt)

159 Well, shit. Brave men.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at October 31, 2014 10:23 AM (IXrOn)

160 "Serious anomaly" --------------- In many ways, this is the story of the Obama administration.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at October 31, 2014 10:23 AM (l1zOH)

161 Sven, the "we should have never left the trees" crowd.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:23 AM (pQOKS)

162 How Russia Could Strangle the US Space Program BUZZARDS BAY, Mass.--Think Russia has no way to put pressure on the United States? Think again. The US relies heavily on Russia to furnish the engines that power rockets that deliver both military and civil payloads into space. This includes GPS systems in cars and cellphones, and even systems that allow ATMs to function. Weather satellites are launched into space via Russian-powered rockets, and military systems such as early missile detection also depend on our friends in Moscow. In addition, since NASA scrapped the space shuttle program in 2011, the US has to rely on Russian Soyuz capsules to get its astronauts to the space station and to bring them back home.

Posted by: Your friendly Danube River Guide at October 31, 2014 10:24 AM (RJMhd)

163 Needing nearly perfect weather every time is a bitch when you don't and can't control that variable.

Posted by: rickb223 at October 31, 2014 03:22 PM (5ic5a)

 

 

 

 

The need for nearly perfect weather is due to the problems with controlling such a large and relatively fragile craft. Also their engines were not very powerful, and their control system primitive.

Posted by: maddogg at October 31, 2014 10:24 AM (xWW96)

164 You may be right, but I can imagine that pretty much the same thing was said about the prospect of air travel back in 1903. ------------ So "See Kitty Hawk From 10 Feet Up" didn't sell a lot of tickets?

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at October 31, 2014 10:24 AM (pbr7X)

165 If man was supposed to go into space we would all be born with space suits.

Posted by: a thinking man at October 31, 2014 10:24 AM (WNERA)

166 "Why is WD-40 called WD-40? The previous 39 attempts failed. But they kept trying and found a winner."

Also a product of rocketry.

The Convair plant in San Diego was making fuel tanks for the Atlas missile (on Atlas, the pressurized tank pretty much *was* the missile). They had problems with salt fog and nighttime condensation on the tank bodies.

A chemist assigned to solve the problem came up with WD-40.

Posted by: torquewrench at October 31, 2014 10:25 AM (noWW6)

167 158 Posted by: t-bird at October 31, 2014 03:23 PM (6WlVt)

at least they didn't dust off the N-1

http://youtu.be/o6wHKzADZNE

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:25 AM (/4AZU)

168 From the CBS coverage:

"Hundreds of people, including celebrities Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Tom Hanks, Katy Perry and Justin Bieber, among others, have already paid $250,000 each for the 15-minute flight when it becomes operational."

So something good might eventually come of this...

Posted by: cool breeze at October 31, 2014 10:25 AM (A+/8k)

169 There have been advances in aerostats. Mostly for surveillance. Coming to a city near you. Tethered aerostats that float above a city and monitor the movements of every vehicle. Were used in Iraq. Will be used here someday.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:25 AM (ZPrif)

170 The Strategic Defense Initiative-- we try to get that to come to fruition via satellites--in space.

Posted by: Your friendly Danube River Guide at October 31, 2014 10:25 AM (RJMhd)

171 WD = Water Displacement

Posted by: someting i heard at October 31, 2014 10:26 AM (WNERA)

172 We joked about the NK-33/RD-180 engines from Russia.  Putin needs the sweet cash from each sale so, unless Gaylord really cheeses him off, an embargo on them is unlikely.  But don't be surprised if the Russians slip in a faulty one.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:26 AM (pQOKS)

173 Posted by: cool breeze at October 31, 2014 03:25 PM Don't tease...

Posted by: RedMindBlueState at October 31, 2014 10:26 AM (knoK7)

174 Shep interviewing "Dick Rocket". Newspace Global Co-Founder. No. I am not joking. Which of you Morons changed his name for this little bit of silly?

Posted by: ColdBeer1[/i][/b][/s][/u] at October 31, 2014 10:26 AM (16bOT)

175 I'm not anti-science or anti -risk taking for the purpose of advancement. But I simply don't believe its feasible, based on today's technology, to create an enterprise that is eventually self-sustaining.

Basically the same exact thing that was said about computers, telephones, automobiles, airplanes, etc. Luddites have a pretty consistent track record.

Posted by: Gristle Encased Head at October 31, 2014 10:26 AM (+lsX1)

176 161 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 03:23 PM (pQOKS)

Yup seen in many a Goreon conclave on "fuck coal"...

I am very close to giving up Anna...

I had a blood pressure spike this week and I swear to God my first thought was "well I'd rather not die here in SC BUT you know what...who cares?"

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:26 AM (/4AZU)

177 Ha. Shep is interviewing a guy on this crash right now. Guys name, Dick Rocket.

Posted by: JackStraw at October 31, 2014 10:27 AM (g1DWB)

178 168 From the CBS coverage:

"Hundreds of people, including celebrities Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Tom Hanks, Katy Perry and Justin Bieber, among others, have already paid $250,000 each for the 15-minute flight when it becomes operational."

So something good might eventually come of this...
Posted by: cool breez


LOL.

Posted by: Dr Spank at October 31, 2014 10:27 AM (DESkV)

179 Actually the RD-180 is an uprated NK-33.  30 of NK-33s were used on the N-1.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:27 AM (pQOKS)

180 Posted by: creeper at October 31, 2014 03:18 PM (I0nPY) there is nothing so life affirming, as being shot at, and missed. orrrrrrr... the Kevlar holds...

Posted by: Romeo13 at October 31, 2014 10:27 AM (f0pWu)

181 That was quick Noah Rothman @NoahCRothman 2m Joël Glenn Brenner accuses Virgin of near complicity in the death of her "friend" who piloted #SpaceShipTwo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7C1RqX47eek&feature=youtu.be

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:27 AM (ZPrif)

182 And the fact that we won't maintain a space capacity while going into massive debt to make sure illiterate bums get free cellphones indicates our country is seriously fucked.

Posted by: --- at October 31, 2014 10:27 AM (MMC8r)

183 "Not only was it an old Soviet rocket, it was a design the Russians abandoned because all four of their tests blew up"

It was the engine from the Sov rocket, not the rocket per se.

It's actually a decent engine design. The problem was that the rocket itself, the intended Russian lunar booster, used fourteen or so of them in the first stage alone. It proved technologically impossible for them to deal with all of the resonance issues of that many engines igniting and running at once.

Posted by: torquewrench at October 31, 2014 10:28 AM (noWW6)

184 But airship tech advances quickly, then stalled for nearly a century. Tech doesn't always get better. Sometimes it quickly advances then stalls out. ------ There are limits which science and technology, or at least practical science and technology, asymptotically approach.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at October 31, 2014 10:28 AM (l1zOH)

185

But...I have never felt more alive in my life. When I made it back to shore safely, I was almost disappointed.

I suspect many of the morons know this feeling.

 

Hellz yeah.  A million years ago I went with the family to Disneyland.  Hated it.  Jumped at the chance to leave when the youngest one gave out.

 

A week later I was out kayaking.  Got caught in a ridiculous chop and current where I could only stay afloat, barely make any headway at all.  And I said to myself, "this is my Disneyland".

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 10:28 AM (JtwS4)

186 A chemist assigned to solve the problem came up with WD-40. 19 more failures would have left us with WD69. Marketing campaigns would be endless......

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 10:28 AM (5ic5a)

187 They switched it from rubber based to plastic based rocket fuel? Posted by: rd at October 31, 2014 02:58 PM (J7NUM) Well that was dumb because science says that if the rocket doesn't take off it can just bounce until it stops

Posted by: Proggie Who Only Believes in SCIENCE at October 31, 2014 10:28 AM (aTXUx)

188 179 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 03:27 PM (pQOKS)

and "in fairness" it wasn't really the NK-33s fault Ivan tried the equivalent of "let's tape these bottle rockets together and see what happens"

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:28 AM (/4AZU)

189 186 Posted by: rickb223 at October 31, 2014 03:28 PM (5ic5a)

uh TWENTY-NINE more failures but who's counting

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:29 AM (/4AZU)

190 Really? What the practical economic model? Because I am not seeing it.

There is probably a short-term model for the "thrill" of it with a very small group who can afford the costs. But beyond that it doesn't seem sustainable.

I'm not anti-science or anti -risk taking for the purpose of advancement. But I simply don't believe its feasible, based on today's technology, to create an enterprise that is eventually self-sustaining.

That doesn't mean they should stop. Branson can keep burning his money for a dream. But I just don't see the venture as anything but a bunch of wishes without a feasible, positive ans sustainable outcome at this point.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 03:07 PM (GGCsk)

 

 

--------------------------------------------

 

 

I've seen articles in very old newspapers that almost quote you word for word about trains and rail travel.  Did you know that  train travel used to kill thousands every year?

Posted by: Soona at October 31, 2014 10:29 AM (AWcPC)

191 I had a difficult time in high school





Posted by: Dick Rocket at October 31, 2014 10:29 AM (8CdUx)

192 A nice 50 minute documentary on how the NK-33 of the N-1 came to be used by the US for rocket launches.  Hat-tip to Rickl again.

http://youtu.be/TMbl_ofF3AM

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:29 AM (pQOKS)

193 Especially since, as with the Virgin model, the flights don't actually take you anywhere -- they're just for "fun." Would you ride rollercoaster if there was a 10% you die in a crash? No. Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 03:12 PM (K4YiS) Yes, I would take a 10% chance of death to fly into space. It is a once in a lifetime experience, even if it might end my lifetime.

Posted by: rd at October 31, 2014 10:30 AM (J7NUM)

194 I've heard it was the paint on the skin of the Hindenburg that was dangerous.

Posted by: despair


Hmm, latex and thermite-doped cloth. What could possibly go wrong?

Posted by: weft cut-loop[/i] [/b] at October 31, 2014 10:30 AM (k1nNw)

195 "If they can't do it in 3.75 billion years. maybe it's for the best?" It takes that long just to get the government approval.

Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 10:30 AM (dcY7v)

196 Shep interviewing "Dick Rocket". Newspace Global Co-Founder.

He was the co-founder of Newspace Global and one of the most beloved porn stars of the 1970's.

Posted by: Gristle Encased Head at October 31, 2014 10:30 AM (+lsX1)

197 Helicopters are a great example. Took forever to develop them. Weren't available for WW2. By the Korean War they'd basically been perfected and we've had mostly the same design for 50 years. Like in a decade the tech went from nothing to everything.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:31 AM (ZPrif)

198 uh TWENTY-NINE more failures but who's counting Uh, yeah. Thank God there is no math on this Smart Military Blog!

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 10:31 AM (5ic5a)

199 I witnessed the crash too. Shep should call me.

Posted by: Hugh G. Rexion at October 31, 2014 10:31 AM (pbr7X)

200 137 One of their pilots is the British Top Gun test pilot, MaCay, I think, is his name. That would be a huge loss.

But what about all those people saying how we should leave space to private business because they don't have failures? Are they out today?

Posted by: Adjoran at October 31, 2014 03:19 PM (QIQ6j)



Why you're RIGHT!  Government is better at everything!  That's why I come to this blog!

Posted by: WTF at October 31, 2014 10:31 AM (dhgmu)

201 193 Posted by: rd at October 31, 2014 03:30 PM (J7NUM)

I'm 42 with SVT Tachycardia and a 15 year old boy...

my debts are nearly square and I would be quite content to roll those dice.

If we as a society are demanded to be indifferent to Schiavo and the latest "let me kill myself" snowflake why can't I risk my life?

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:31 AM (/4AZU)

202 You didn't build that, pale face

Posted by: Liawatha at October 31, 2014 10:32 AM (xKIE3)

203 *twitch*

Posted by: rickb's math teacher at October 31, 2014 10:32 AM (WxXqb)

204 Someone please tell Shep Smith to stop sexting me.  Sh*t gets old fast...



Posted by: Dick Rocket at October 31, 2014 10:32 AM (8CdUx)

205

Ha. Shep is interviewing a guy on this crash right now. Guys name, Dick Rocket.

 

Has he said "ba ba bouie" yet?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 10:32 AM (JtwS4)

206 I had a difficult time in high school Posted by: Dick Rocket at October 31, 2014 03:29 PM Word.

Posted by: Biggus Dickus at October 31, 2014 10:32 AM (knoK7)

207 Dick Rocket?


Really?



Posted by: EC at October 31, 2014 10:33 AM (GQ8sn)

208 i heard this loud bang, then I looked up and saw a fireball hurtling toward the Earth.

Posted by: Heywood Jablome at October 31, 2014 10:33 AM (pbr7X)

209 A charming snippet from that documentary was when the Politburo scrapped the whole N-1 project.  At least one N-1 was used as a pig stye.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:33 AM (pQOKS)

210 Angry lady on CNN was angry.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 10:34 AM (ZPrif)

211 Has Shep begun weeping yet, or yelling about cannibalism?

Posted by: Stu-22 at October 31, 2014 10:34 AM (RMOpc)

212 *twitch* Posted by: rickb's math teacher By the time I graduated, she didn't even need C batteries anymore.

Posted by: rickb223[/s][/b][/I] at October 31, 2014 10:34 AM (5ic5a)

213 Since when is the race to control space considered "friendly"? Is it asking too much to investigate the first incident--as just possibly not an accident. That isn't paranoid--that is prudence. gawd.

Posted by: Your friendly Danube River Guide at October 31, 2014 10:34 AM (RJMhd)

214 207 Dick Rocket? Really? Posted by: EC at October 31, 2014 03:33 PM (GQ8sn) Talk about an unfortunate name...

Posted by: Anthony Weiner at October 31, 2014 10:34 AM (f0pWu)

215

>>>Not a 50 year old Russian design, an actual engine that was built in Russia 50 years ago.

 

It was on clearance at Amazon!

 

2 day delivery!

Posted by: Bigby's Senor Wences Handpuppet at October 31, 2014 10:34 AM (3ZtZW)

216 For decades about one in 9 was killed climbing everest. Well actually most were killed descending.

Posted by: Bob from table9 at October 31, 2014 10:35 AM (WNERA)

217 215 Posted by: Bigby's Senor Wences Handpuppet at October 31, 2014 03:34 PM (3ZtZW)


Could be used safely to launch up vanity junk....

"Hi mom!" 50 grand

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:35 AM (/4AZU)

218 We have no choice on space exploration save the private sector. I doubt the Obamabots could get a store bought kite off the ground.

Posted by: maddogg at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM (xWW96)

219 Also, this whole business of the USA relying extensively on the Russians for space technology and space services such as launches to ISS was all a Clinton administration brainstorm.

It was thought that, gee whiz, there are all these brainy former Soviets, literal rocket scientists and nuclear scientists, and with the end of the Cold War, they'll be unemployed, and they'll put their talents on the international market, and rogue states will snap them up and make use of their expertise.

So, the Clintonistas concluded, we should pay them to sit tight in Russia and work on joint programs from there.

End result? Clinton paid to preserve military engineering capabilities for Russia from which Putin's murderous regime now benefits. And, the technologies which were intended to be kept away from the rogue states are leaking out or being sold by Putin anyway.

The Pentagon let slip last week that the North Koreans now have mastered miniaturized thermonuclear warheads. That is massively nontrivial and the Norks could not possibly have figured it out on their own. But with a bit of quiet Russian help here and there? A breeze.

What should have been done with the Russian boffins in the Nineties would have been to quietly spirit as many of them out of the country as possible and bring them Stateside. Give them citizenship and secure their loyalties. Another Operation Paperclip.

Lost opportunity now. Thanks, Billy Jeff!

Posted by: torquewrench at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM (noWW6)

220 216 For decades about one in 9 was killed climbing everest. Well actually most were killed descending. --------- Pffft. Piker.

Posted by: K2 at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM (pbr7X)

221 Headline: "Dick Rocket Fails To Keep It Up"

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM (WxXqb)

222 it wasn't just the Hindenburg, it was the Akron and the Macon and the R101 and a few others that proved that even if you filled them with helium (on which the US had an effective monopoly) large airships were still too vulnerable to weather to be commercially viable. --- Still, I'd love to see leisurely coast-to-coast luxury service by large capacity, very high flying dirigibles. If they can do 100mph they can make the trip in a day.

Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM (dcY7v)

223 Pope Francis: 'Caring for the poor does not make you a communist'
http://is.gd/GQzf66


It does if you do it with other people's money.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM (evdj2)

224 125 Regarding comments by zombie: Won't the market be the best to decide if these flights are ready for prime time? Maybe the satisfaction delivered to the participants is so amazing that it is worth the 10% fatality rate. And given that this is still in its very earliest stages, the rate will inevitably go down. Posted by: WTF Oh, I agree fully. If someone is willing to risk their life for the thrill, and pay money to do so, let I agree: go for it, you crazy dude. I am laissez-faire. HOWEVER I was not criticizing the urge for exploration or the benefits of technological experiementation: I was merely noting that as a business venture you are like to fail if your product is prone to fatality-inducing accidents -- especially if that product is non-essential. If a pharmaceutical company invented a pill that would cure you of otherwise-fatal brain cancer -- but there's a 25% chance the pill would give you a heart attack and kill you, then heck most terminally patients would take the risk and swallow the pill. But if the same company made pill that merely make you laugh at nothing, like breathing in nitrous oxide, and yet it also had 25% fatality rate -- then heck no, no one in their right mid would swallow the pill "just for fun." Similarly, if we can explore space and trained Air Force pilots are willing to risk their lives to push the boundaries of what mankind is capable of -- even i there was a 25% chance they'd die in the attempt -- I say hurrah and more power to 'em. But if an entrepreneur was to shuttle tourists around for fun and yet there is a high risk of death, I'm merely pointing out that that is not a good business model, just as the laughing-pill that kills you is not a good business model. Sorry my comments have been somewhat misunderstood. It's not a big deal -- I just dont want anyone to think I'm anti-exploration.

Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 10:36 AM (K4YiS)

225 >>Basically the same exact thing that was said about computers, telephones, automobiles, airplanes, etc. Luddites have a pretty consistent track record.<<

Look, let's not get buffoonish. I could take you through each of those inventions, the nature of their value and the means by which they were developed. I could also take you through the business models that helped them develop into what they are today.

This ain't even close.

I think innovation, unconventional thinking and vision all have an important place in our society and its advancement. But there eventually has to be a practicality, a usefulness and purpose to which that particular advancement is attuned.

I don't see this effort has that  since most of the elements are missing. As is the practical purpose.

What being done is to take technology that already largely exists, and using financial margins as a guide, using the cheapest (and often untested) means of putting together a "space" vehicle for the purpose of someones personal enjoyment. It's a sideshow and losing proposition IMVHO

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 10:37 AM (GGCsk)

226 Actually there are already plans to switch from the AJ-26 to a new engine in 2017 for the Antares.  Age, availability, and the few motor failures being the reasons.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:37 AM (pQOKS)

227 O/T anyone else note the large amount of very concerned new posters in the Sheryl Attkisson thread? Seems someone is worried about that story getting any traction....

Posted by: Romeo13 at October 31, 2014 10:37 AM (f0pWu)

228 For decades about one in 9 was killed climbing everest. Well actually most were killed descending. Voluntarily or involuntarily?

Posted by: Brother Cavil at October 31, 2014 10:37 AM (rt3TY)

229 @215: "It was on clearance at Amazon! 2 day delivery!" And they only bought the engine 'cause of the free Amazon Fire phone included with purchase.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at October 31, 2014 10:38 AM (kqGWM)

230 221 Headline: "Dick Rocket Fails To Keep It Up" Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 31, 2014 03:36 PM (WxXqb) well....

Posted by: Bob Dole at October 31, 2014 10:38 AM (f0pWu)

231 I would have gone with Richie Rocket myself.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:38 AM (evdj2)

232 We're still dealing with those few post-1989 years of huggy-friendly relations with our new pals the Russians. We gotta get over that post-Cold War stupid and get back to it.

Posted by: --- at October 31, 2014 10:39 AM (MMC8r)

233 Took forever to develop them. Weren't available for WW2. By the Korean War they'd basically been perfected and we've had mostly the same design for 50 years. Like in a decade the tech went from nothing to everything. Posted by: Costanza Defense at October 31, 2014 03:31 PM (ZPrif) Oddly enough, i've seen a couple of World War II movies which featured the use of Helicopters. I think one of them was "Where Eagles Dare", but i'm not sure.

Posted by: D-Lamp at October 31, 2014 10:39 AM (txvbW)

234 They are throwing a little celebration for the ebola dog tomorrow at 9 am CST. I suspect Nina is having some alone time with Bentley before that. http://goo.gl/OubflT

Posted by: The Progs at October 31, 2014 10:39 AM (iQIUe)

235 Sooner or later, some cardinals are going to have to do something about this turbulent Pope

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at October 31, 2014 10:39 AM (WxXqb)

236 They should have used Muslim scientists.

Posted by: NASA at October 31, 2014 10:39 AM (wAQA5)

237 Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 03:37 PM (GGCsk) Yup.... not enough lift capacity to really do anything valid with it. You quickly reach the point where your launch aircraft does not exist....

Posted by: Romeo13 at October 31, 2014 10:40 AM (f0pWu)

238 The only thing I noticed in the Attkisson thread was how generally fucking clueless most of our morons are regarding network security and how these newfangled computerized contraptions seem to work.

Posted by: Walter Freeman at October 31, 2014 10:40 AM (kqGWM)

239 If you are going to summit Everest, the window of survivability is small. If you summit too late in the day, your chances of survival plummet to next to nothing.

Posted by: maddogg at October 31, 2014 10:40 AM (xWW96)

240 They should have used Muslim scientists. Posted by: NASA True. They could have upped the explosive yield.

Posted by: Brother Cavil at October 31, 2014 10:40 AM (rt3TY)

241 SpaceX has been incredibly lucky so far. They dodged the bullet on one flight when an engine shut down and vented with enough velocity to blow out a chunk of the housing, limping into a lower then desired orbit but able to reach the ISS with cargo. This week has demonstrated that disaster can and will unfortunately happen to all who operate in this dangerous profession.

Posted by: tbd at October 31, 2014 10:40 AM (1MtJo)

242

>>>But if an entrepreneur was to shuttle tourists around for fun and yet there is a high risk of death

 

Trying to think of the marketing angle..... Maybe Clint Eastwood going "Cmon ya got one foot in the box already, pussy"

Posted by: Bigby's Senor Wences Handpuppet at October 31, 2014 10:41 AM (3ZtZW)

243 233 Posted by: D-Lamp at October 31, 2014 03:39 PM (txvbW)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikorsky_R-4

Helicopters saw limited SOCOM use in WW2

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:41 AM (/4AZU)

244 "The question is exactly what happen" Shep Smith has reached John Madden levels of insight.

Posted by: wooga at October 31, 2014 10:41 AM (yDyha)

245 Actually the first combat rescue of casualties by helicopter occurred in WWII in 1944.

http://olive-drab.com/od_medical_evac_helio_ww2.php

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:41 AM (pQOKS)

246 by the way I finally agree with Sinead O'Connor "f**k the Pope"

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:42 AM (/4AZU)

247 Shep Smith has reached John Madden levels of insight.

They didn't get a hat on a hat!

Posted by: John Madden at October 31, 2014 10:42 AM (evdj2)

248 Not a good week for space travel.

Posted by: Val & Earl, Handymen at October 31, 2014 10:42 AM (W66oz)

249 Look, one night when  the Chinese dry cleaners daughter was closing the store, I banged her on a heap of clothes. That doesn't make me Don Juan or even Don Wang. It just makes me some guy who banged a Chinese chick. It's that simple.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 10:42 AM (GGCsk)

250

OT bleg for crafts advice. 

 

I want to do Braveheart Mel Gibson for Halloween.  I figure I can make a kilt from fabric, and I'm willing to tear up an old Pendleton shirt for the top. And paint my face blue.

 

But I haven't figured out how to make something like the leather breastplate he wore.

 

Any ideas?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 10:42 AM (JtwS4)

251 162 How Russia Could Strangle the US Space Program

That's cute.

Posted by: Elon Musk and his U.S. made rocket engines at October 31, 2014 10:43 AM (xJ0ps)

252 Lots of streets named after dead test pilots at Edwards AFB.

Posted by: Bob from table9 at October 31, 2014 10:43 AM (WNERA)

253 245 Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 03:41 PM (pQOKS)

They would also do mountain top extractions of OSS and SOE operators....

Go War

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:43 AM (/4AZU)

254 But I haven't figured out how to make something like the leather breastplate he wore.

Any ideas?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 03:42 PM (JtwS4)

 

Hobo skin

Posted by: The Jackhole at October 31, 2014 10:45 AM (6/J77)

255 Still, I'd love to see leisurely coast-to-coast luxury service by large capacity, very high flying dirigibles. If they can do 100mph they can make the trip in a day. Posted by: despair at October 31, 2014 03:36 PM (dcY7v) Through a mid-west thunderstorm? THAT would have a 10% fatality rate. Just ask the crew of the Akron and Macon.

Posted by: rd at October 31, 2014 10:46 AM (J7NUM)

256 Any ideas?

How realistic does it have to be?  Naugahyde covered cardboard might work.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:46 AM (evdj2)

257 >>Look, one night when the Chinese dry cleaners daughter was closing the store, I banged her on a heap of clothes. That doesn't make me Don Juan or even Don Wang. It just makes me some guy who banged a Chinese chick. It's that simple. Rich and compelling. But I'm not seeing the link to exploding rockets. Oh wait....

Posted by: JackStraw at October 31, 2014 10:46 AM (g1DWB)

258 What being done is to take technology that already largely exists, and using financial margins as a guide, using the cheapest (and often untested) means of putting together a "space" vehicle for the purpose of someones personal enjoyment. It's a sideshow and losing proposition IMVHO

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 03:37 PM (GGCsk)

 

 

---------------------------------------------

 

 

Every mode of mass transportation has gone through these same doubts and growing pains.  Just because you can't see a practical application of spaceflight now doesn't mean there will never be one.  And, yes, most of these new modes of transportation were only available to the rich and/or thrill seekers  or people who want to see something few have ever  experience  or  seen before.

Posted by: Soona at October 31, 2014 10:47 AM (AWcPC)

259

>>>But there eventually has to be a practicality, a usefulness and purpose to which that particular advancement is attuned.

 

That's right! WTF did the space race ever get us, anyway? Besides food preservation, ballistic missles guidance, long range rocket fuels, advancements in medicine and physiology, and satellite systems allowing global communications.

Posted by: Bigby's Senor Wences Handpuppet at October 31, 2014 10:47 AM (3ZtZW)

260 But I haven't figured out how to make something like the leather breastplate he wore.

Any ideas?

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 03:42 PM (JtwS4)

 

 

 

pasteboard covered with leather grained brown naugahyde.

Posted by: maddogg at October 31, 2014 10:47 AM (xWW96)

261


How realistic does it have to be? Naugahyde covered cardboard might work.

 

There's my Horde!  Perfect.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 10:47 AM (JtwS4)

262 Worth re-posting.

49 Shep, bringing the smarts to TV



"The question is exactly what happen"



You don't say? Damn, that never occurred to me.

Posted by: Nip Sip at October 31, 2014 10:47 AM (0FSuD)

263 TANG

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at October 31, 2014 10:47 AM (pQOKS)

264 I had a neighbor a couple of decades ago whose husband died piloting experimental aircraft. She never really fully recovered from losing him. Pre space flight days. Those test pilots were the best of the best.

Posted by: Truck Monkey, Aiming His Torpedo at October 31, 2014 10:48 AM (32Ze2)

265 264 Posted by: Truck Monkey, Aiming His Torpedo at October 31, 2014 03:48 PM (32Ze2)

absolutely heroes....


Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 10:49 AM (/4AZU)

266 The first users always pay the freight. Now air travel treated like getting on a bus was. Have to see how this turns out. My crystal ball has never been very good.

Posted by: Bob from table9 at October 31, 2014 10:49 AM (WNERA)

267 Dick Rocket?  Much less painful of a name

Posted by: Dick Trickle at October 31, 2014 10:49 AM (xKIE3)

268

Look, one night when the Chinese dry cleaners daughter was closing the store, I banged her on a heap of clothes.

.....................

She didn't have a basket hanging from the ceiling?

Posted by: wth at October 31, 2014 10:49 AM (wAQA5)

269 Jebuz.  Two of you with the same perfect idea.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 10:49 AM (JtwS4)

270 Can you imagine if Branson was a conservative what the coverage of this event would be like?

"Billionaire businessman kills pilot with foolish money making scheme that was trying to create expensive ride for his fellow 1-percenters!
 Koch Bros likely involved"


Posted by: McAdams at October 31, 2014 10:50 AM (roRVQ)

271 But I haven't figured out how to make something like the leather breastplate he wore.

Any ideas?

Posted by: Bandersnatch


Leather shop apron with black lines drawn on to look like the laminar, if time, shade the bottom angle of each with a dark brown line. Punch grommets for the riveting.

Posted by: weft cut-loop[/i] [/b] at October 31, 2014 10:50 AM (k1nNw)

272 >>Lots of streets named after dead test pilots at Edwards AFB.<<

Taking a technology that already existed and trying to bring it to the next level. The explicit purpose of which was to create aircraft advancements that would put us way ahead of rivals in the game of warfare. Ultimately those advancements kept us safer.

Flying a cheap "spacecraft" for some some overindulgent weenie to post pictures on Twitter and complain about the funny taste in his crudite at 80,000 AGL. Not so much.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 10:50 AM (GGCsk)

273

Test pilots have to have balls of steel because they know, with experimental designs, NOBODY knows what they're doing. He has to play it by ear a lot, and if he guesses wrong......

Posted by: maddogg at October 31, 2014 10:50 AM (xWW96)

274 262 Worth re-posting. 49 Shep, bringing the smarts to TV "The question is exactly what happen" You don't say? Damn, that never occurred to me. Posted by: Nip Sip at October Steps middle name Obvious

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian, let's bungle in the jungle at October 31, 2014 10:52 AM (b5BZa)

275  I had a neighbor a couple of decades ago whose husband died piloting experimental aircraft. She never really fully recovered from losing him. Pre space flight days. Those test pilots were the best of the best.

Posted by: Truck Monkey, Aiming His Torpedo at October 31, 2014 03:48 PM (32Ze2)

 

 

----------------------------------------

 

 

The 1950's.  Test pilots were dying left and right  during those "golden" years,  but aviation  took some very giant strides toward what we take for granted today.

Posted by: Soona at October 31, 2014 10:52 AM (AWcPC)

276 Shep Dam auto spell

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian, let's bungle in the jungle at October 31, 2014 10:52 AM (b5BZa)

277 Test reports are written in blood.

Posted by: Jean at October 31, 2014 10:52 AM (TETYm)

278 I'm getting the sense, that perhaps space tarvel is ...kinda hard to do....

Posted by: Buck Rogers at October 31, 2014 10:53 AM (sta+V)

279 We didn't build that

Posted by: Estes at October 31, 2014 10:53 AM (xKIE3)

280 Nude Pod People.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:53 AM (evdj2)

281 Time to go see you morons on Sunday. Be well

Posted by: Misanthropic Humanitarian, let's bungle in the jungle at October 31, 2014 10:53 AM (b5BZa)

282
Within hours of the Antares explosion there were leftys on the web proclaiming rocketry was something that only the government could do.

Anybody surprised at that?

Posted by: Ed Anger at October 31, 2014 10:54 AM (RcpcZ)

283 The Right Stuff could have been a lot shorter movie if they'd just said 'Hey, that shit's dangerous.'

Posted by: --- at October 31, 2014 10:55 AM (MMC8r)

284 >>Posted by: Soona at October 31, 2014 03:47 PM (AWcPC) <<

Is "spaceflight" something new? Not really and their are plenty of very smart people working on numerous useful innovations. This isn't one of them.

Look I think Branson has every right to piece together his space hooptie with the purpose of entertaining his rich friends. Every one eventually dies or has the potential to go broke.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 10:55 AM (GGCsk)

285 Flying a cheap "spacecraft" for some some overindulgent weenie to post pictures on Twitter and complain about the funny taste in his crudite at 80,000 AGL. Not so much.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 03:50 PM (GGCsk)

 

 

--------------------------

 

 

What I'm happy about is that you'll  never be in charge of developing practical private-enterprise spaceflight.

Posted by: Soona at October 31, 2014 10:56 AM (AWcPC)

286 Within hours of the Antares explosion there were leftys on the web proclaiming rocketry was something that only the government could do.

Astronauts Chaffee Grissom and White might disagree.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 10:56 AM (evdj2)

287 Posted by: Walter Freeman at October 31, 2014 03:40 PM (kqGWM) Really? Yeah... I have no clue myself.... After retiring from the Navy where I worked on everything from Sat Coms, to Radars, to oh.... the machine code of computers dealing with Failsafe for nuclear weapons when I worked for COMSUBPAC... I only became an MCSE, MCT, CNE... whose worked in IT since then... in everything from Network Engineering, to Software Testing for a Startup Security firm... to teaching MCSE classes... Hate to think I was one of those who was categorized as 'clueless'....

Posted by: Romeo13 at October 31, 2014 11:00 AM (f0pWu)

288


Astronauts Chaffee Grissom and White might disagree.

 

Revisiting the dead thread in honor of Chaffee, Grissom and White. 

 

I was six years old.  I knew those names better than I knew who played for the Red Sox.

Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 11:01 AM (JtwS4)

289 250 bandersnatch Spay paint a piece of foam.

Posted by: Limboland at October 31, 2014 11:03 AM (yGM1u)

290 Look, let's not get buffoonish. I could take you through each of those inventions, the nature of their value and the means by which they were developed. I could also take you through the business models that helped them develop into what they are today.

Oh sure, you definitely wouldn't have been the guy calling the Wright brothers a couple of dicks because your horse could go way further than that stupid deathtrap. And I'm sure that the business model for automobiles would have been super obvious to you before there were decent roads and gas stations on every corner. But space travel? I'm sure you're right. No way could that ever become affordable or useful.

Posted by: Gristle Encased Head at October 31, 2014 11:03 AM (+lsX1)

291 I'd be happy with an X37B with 2hrs of air, a space qualified iPod with some music of my choice, and two "flight nurses" from Manila. Who needs pilots?

Posted by: Jean at October 31, 2014 11:04 AM (TETYm)

292 >>Posted by: Soona at October 31, 2014 03:56 PM (AWcPC) <<

You have no idea how many projects that people who claim a visit from the Good Idea Fairy last night end up getting flushed. On the other hand I do.

That skips over the part where people who had truly innovative ideas, which possessed vision and a purpose, even if only half baked, have made a believer out of me and went on to be successful.

Every American has the right to create and indulge in various pursuits. That is the beauty of a free country. But reality is most fail because they have not been thought through to conclusion.

More then ever, there are ways to get a project funded. People are actually out looking for projects. VC guys or on just about every potential invention or innovation like flies on poop.

In my estimation this idea is half baked and with no real purpose. The only thing keeping it going is one man's fortune and his friends.

I could be wrong. I've been wrong before. But this doesn't smell like it.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 11:07 AM (GGCsk)

293 250 OT bleg for crafts advice. I want to do Braveheart Mel Gibson for Halloween. I figure I can make a kilt from fabric, and I'm willing to tear up an old Pendleton shirt for the top. And paint my face blue. But I haven't figured out how to make something like the leather breastplate he wore. Any ideas? Posted by: Bandersnatch at October 31, 2014 03:42 PM (JtwS4) Just go topless with lots of blue paint, you don't have time to wet form and cure several layers of hide.

Posted by: Jean at October 31, 2014 11:08 AM (TETYm)

294 Every American has the right to create and indulge in various pursuits. That is the beauty of a free country. Isn't Branson an English subject?

Posted by: Jean at October 31, 2014 11:10 AM (TETYm)

295 Canada has suspended visas to West Africa. That's what happens, nurse snotty firecrotch, when you refuse to cooperate.

Posted by: The Progs at October 31, 2014 11:10 AM (iQIUe)

296 >>But space travel? I'm sure you're right. No way could that ever become affordable or useful.<<

Ack. Look I am not trying to be argumentative. But you do know that "space travel" exists right?

The game is to make that into a repeatable business model. Right now that doesn't exist and the answers aren't going to come from a guy like Branson. Especially not using his approach.

 By the way, he's not the only one working on it. There are other much more talented people with better ideas trying to monetize the right paradigm.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 11:11 AM (GGCsk)

297 By the way, he's not the only one working on it. There are other much more talented people with better ideas trying to monetize the right paradigm.

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 04:11 PM (GGCsk)

 

 

------------------------------------------

 

 

How many flights  to the edge of the atmosphere have they flown?

Posted by: Soona at October 31, 2014 11:14 AM (AWcPC)

298 I guess the free market doesn't do everything better?

Posted by: Mouthbreather at October 31, 2014 11:23 AM (bY2Gt)

299 NASA: 17   Virgin: 1

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 11:27 AM (evdj2)

300 Nood up.

Posted by: CM at October 31, 2014 11:27 AM (0NdlF)

301 NASA has only killed 14 astronauts during actual spaceflight. 7 with Challenger and 7 with Columbia. I assume you're lumping Apollo 1 in there as well?

Posted by: Mouthbreather at October 31, 2014 11:35 AM (bY2Gt)

302 You guys were giving me a hard time, but this is part of what I meant;

Developing:

>>Overcome with emotion over the loss of someone she described as her friend, Brenner asserted that the private space program was never ready for prime time and that the company was negligent in allowing it to go forward. <<

Posted by: Marcus T at October 31, 2014 11:39 AM (y3zyS)

303 I assume you're lumping Apollo 1 in there as well?

I am.  I'm discounting those killed in other training exercises because people crash planes all the time.

Posted by: toby928(C) at October 31, 2014 11:42 AM (evdj2)

304 The US relies heavily on Russia to furnish the engines that power rockets that deliver both military and civil payloads into space. Posted by: Your friendly Danube River Guide at October 31, 2014 03:24 PM That relationship only applies to the Atlas program and is winding down. The U.S. has had engines in development for several years that will be ready to fly before our current inventory of RD-180s (about two years' worth) are used up. The Delta program uses RS-68 engines that were developed and built in the U.S. by Aerojet Rocketdyne, and has never had anything to do with the Russians.

Posted by: CQD at October 31, 2014 11:54 AM (UC2gr)

305

If a rocket motor decides to blow up, you're gonna blow up too.

That's the unfortunate side of generating thrust.


Posted by: Rev. Dr. Esp PhD Buzz Bunnies at October 31, 2014 11:57 AM (cNiT0)

306 Progress requires risk and risk can mean death. None of this work should be stopped. They should carry-on and redouble their effort.

Posted by: eman at October 31, 2014 11:59 AM (60sIH)

307 "Space is disease and danger wrapped in darkness and silence." Prayers for the courageous

Posted by: Fewenuff at October 31, 2014 12:16 PM (rTbTa)

308 No-matter how many times you test a rocket motor. Sometimes they just fail. Look at the space program since the 1960. It happen folks.

Posted by: Dustoff at October 31, 2014 12:22 PM (FaMqY)

309 Marcus You guys were giving me a hard time, but this is part of what I meant; _________________________________________ Short story. You should have shut your poor trap before making the comment. Yes we are. Ever work on spacecraft or rockets? Not easy and yes, stuff fails!

Posted by: Dustoff at October 31, 2014 12:27 PM (FaMqY)

310 As the last week have proven twice: Space flight is still extremely dangerous. Posted by: zombie at October 31, 2014 02:53 PM (K4YiS) True, but remember that Orville Wright killed a young Lt. Selfredge during a crash at a demonstration for the Army. The danger will always be there. You don't progress without men like these.

Posted by: Bill H at October 31, 2014 12:41 PM (3sZO1)

311 Gravity kills again.

Posted by: @PeeteySDee at October 31, 2014 01:46 PM (nbOS6)

312 311 Posted by: @PeeteySDee at October 31, 2014 06:46 PM (nbOS6)

Mother Nature wins all ties

Posted by: sven10077@sven10077[/i][/b][/s] at October 31, 2014 02:46 PM (/4AZU)

313 You may want to correct this article. This spacecraft was never designed to reach orbit. It is suborbital. Like the first two Mercury flights.

Posted by: garth farkley at October 31, 2014 03:01 PM (HJjVD)

314 This happened while I was at work so I didn't have a chance to comment. I first saw it here and immediately went to the spaceflight sites to read about it. In a way, it reminded me of the Challenger disaster. In that case, I was at work and when somebody told me about it, I immediately went to the TV room and remained there for the rest of the day. I couldn't concentrate on my work after that. I told my supervisor to just count it as a vacation day. Today, I had the internet at my desk, but again I didn't get much work done after hearing the news. My condolences to the family of the co-pilot, and I hope the pilot makes a full recovery.

Posted by: rickl at October 31, 2014 04:15 PM (sdi6R)

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Posted by: chaussures de foot at October 31, 2014 04:52 PM (AItWm)

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Posted by: chaussures de foot at October 31, 2014 04:53 PM (AItWm)

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