February 26, 2011

There's a shocking amount of energy being found [ArthurK]
— Open Blogger

Here's a linkfest for news about shale gas, oil from shale rock,tar sands and such. We keep finding more of it. It'd be nice if we were able to USE more of it in the US. They seem pretty excited about shale gas in the UK, Europe and Israel.


-------------------


US proved natural gas, crude oil reserves soar

* Gas reserves rise most in U.S. history

* Technology advances, not new fields, boost reserves


U.S. natural gas reserves increased by the most in history last year, and crude reserves also rose, as companies drilled frantically into shale rock
formations with new technology...

U.S. net proved crude oil reserves rose 9 percent, or 1.8 billion barrels, to 22.3 billion barrels in 2009. Texas saw its proved oil volumes rise most, by 529 million barrels, or 11 percent.

North Dakota, home of the oil-rich Bakken Shale formation, saw its reserves jump by a whopping 83 percent, or 481 million barrels.



-------------------

North America: The new energy kingdom


(the claim about more oil produced in October than in any other month ever is wrong - twice as much was produced in 1970. The other statements are still interesting)

Just as it seemed that the world was running on fumes, giant oil fields were discovered off the coasts of Brazil and Africa, and Canadian oil sands projects expanded so fast, they now provide North America with more oil than Saudi Arabia.


With rising production from shale fields, the U.S. surpassed Russia last year to become the world's largest supplier of natural gas.


For natural gas, the U.S. has the four largest fields in the world...



-------------------

Shale-Gas Output May Double by 2035


This year’s outlook more than doubles the estimate of U.S. technically recoverable reserves of natural gas from shale, a type of sedimentary rock, to 827 trillion cubic feet from 347 trillion cubic feet.




-------------------

Shale Gas - A revolution 50 years in the making?




Gas markets consultant Leigh Bolton of Holmwood Consulting gave a wary view of shale's prospects. It was a comprehensive catalog of concerns, focusing on the difficulties of drilling and uncertainty of return, rather than eco-alarmism. Bolton said that the European experience of shale would be very different to that of the US. Partly this was because of the high population density, but also because of red tape, and the lack of a services infrastructure here. By contrast, the US has a tradition of wild-catting, and established services pop up as soon as excavators need them. This means higher costs.



Another guy said...



One field alone in populous Texas, Barnett Shale, has produced 226bn cubic metres (BCM) since 2004. The UK needs to import 10.4bn cubic metres of gas. A few fields here* could see Britain exporting LNG - something the US shale producers are already doing in volume. He said every pessimistic estimate to date had been proven wrong - the recoverable reserve estimates in Argentina and India had grown tenfold and twentyfold respectively in just two years.



*UK has unexploited shale gas fields.


Poland receives 70 per cent of its gas from Russian-owned Gazprom, which has turned off the pipeline to neighbours the Ukraine and Belarus. Poland sits on perhaps the largest potential reserves of shale in the world, and for the fast five years has seen a gold rush, with 11 energy companies acquiring licences, drilling rights and creating exploratory wells.


"For six months it's noisy and loud, there's trucks and noise, then it's ready. And they get roads and infrastructure and 50 years of local, low-cost gas." A well is surrounded by trees and looks like a small spinney - hard to spot from Google Earth, he said. Poles were delighted to be energy-independent from Russia, he said.



Yay, Poland!


Gasland* gave shale some notoriety for showing householders with flaming water coming from their taps. But the local Oil and Gas Conservation Commission declared the combustible material had come from decomposing surface material, not the well.


This isn't too surprising when the aquifer is at 100m, and the fracking takes place several thousand metres below.



*HBO documentary.



-------------------

Scramble For Shale Gas Riches



The development of shale gas in America has transformed the country from the world’s biggest gas importer to a producer with nearly a century’s worth of new supplies.


Wood Mackenzie, the analyst, said that if Polish shale works, it could increase European reserves by 50%. Here, as in America, shales have long been ignored. Drillers usually passed right through them to get to reservoirs below. Fracking has turned them into a resource, though it is not without complications.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 01:52 PM | Comments (180)
Post contains 782 words, total size 5 kb.

1 Why do I get so many extra lines between my paragraphs?

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at February 26, 2011 01:54 PM (rQ2EG)

2 Obumbles won't drill it.

Posted by: Have Blue at February 26, 2011 01:59 PM (mV+es)

3 i 'll put a stop to this in my 2nd term - baracky

Posted by: newrouter at February 26, 2011 02:00 PM (nfC5u)

4 No permits to be had

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 02:01 PM (M9Ie6)

5 When will the Obama-run EPA ban fracking? 

Posted by: Kratos (Ghost of Sparta) at February 26, 2011 02:01 PM (G/uDq)

6

Some of us who follow this have been saying for many years, that we COULD be energy independent IF the Government would get out of the way...

Compressed Natural gas for Automobiles... diesel for Trucks... and Nuc for Electricity.... and we're good for at least 200 years...

Posted by: Romeo13 at February 26, 2011 02:01 PM (agOaL)

7 might be time to ditch that 'ol 386 and get a pentium machine...

Posted by: Uncle Jed at February 26, 2011 02:02 PM (qPTz0)

8 This is the upside of higher oil prices, as the price goes up more and more of these "homegrown" oil sources will be exploited. Provided the Obama Interior Department allows it. That's where Congressional oversight is required. Take any of Frank Church's speeches from the 1970's and replace "CIA" with "EPA", or "Interior Dept.", (or FCC for that matter) and you have the roadmap. Just imagine if some conservative in the House actually had the testicular fortitude to say something like: "The EPA is a rogue elephant and Congress must reign it in!". Pure gold...

Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 02:03 PM (3kefp)

9

This will not do.

Posted by: Al Gore at February 26, 2011 02:03 PM (xTSet)

10
The use of oil is unsustainable, and only an immediate rush to wind power and solar will save the nation. 

Posted by: Joe Biden, Best VP Evah! at February 26, 2011 02:03 PM (ZHsNw)

11 U.S. natural gas reserves increased by the most in history last year, and crude reserves also rose, as companies drilled frantically into shale rock
formations with new technology...

Not if I have any say in it.

Posted by: George Soros and Troll-minions at February 26, 2011 02:04 PM (6dq0h)

12 Someone doesn't know how to use the blockquote tag.

Posted by: Stan at February 26, 2011 02:05 PM (dSHKh)

13 10
The use of oil is unsustainable, and only an immediate rush to wind power and solar will save the nation. 

Posted by: Joe Biden, Best VP Evah! at February 26, 2011 07:03 PM (ZHsNw)

Wind and solar power??? Is that when you get a blow job, while also outside getting a tan?

Posted by: Charley Sheen at February 26, 2011 02:05 PM (agOaL)

14 ho hum *yawn*

Posted by: GOP at February 26, 2011 02:06 PM (2O5Hd)

15 This is all no surprise. It has been known for a long time. Why do you think the government has been sweeping up all the land for the public (my ass) trough? This way they can keep anyone from benefiting from these new discoveries. What the government does not own, they will lawyer away any ability to utilize the resource. It's gorebull warming or bust for these morons. Gotta save the planet don't you know.

Posted by: Meddler at February 26, 2011 02:06 PM (fCBw5)

16 "Gasland" is up for best documentary at Sunday's Academy Awards ceremony. Director Josh Fox's dark portrayal of greedy energy companies, sickened homeowners and oblivious regulators has stirred heated debate among the various stakeholders in a natural gas boom that is sweeping parts of the U.S. This includes northeast Pennsylvania, where the Marcellus shale deposit holds vast natural gas reserves. The film has galvanized anti-drilling activists while drawing complaints about its accuracy and objectivity.

Posted by: PoconoJoe at February 26, 2011 02:07 PM (cXTFr)

17

North Dakota, home of the oil-rich Bakken Shale formation, saw its reserves jump by a whopping 83 percent, or 481 million barrels.
The world uses this amount in six effin days people. Get a grip. It only helps us go another 24 days.

That said...drill it. Until we HAVE to use something else for fuel we're going to lick the plate clean. So keep on licking.

Honey Badger don't give a shit.

Posted by: torabora at February 26, 2011 02:08 PM (QvClC)

18 But-but-but Peak Oil!

<Plugs ears> Na-na-na-na, I can't hear you!

Posted by: Coast to Coast listeners at February 26, 2011 02:08 PM (S59+B)

19 OT but apparently thousands of Libyans are fleeing the country into Tunisia.  Does that mean that they'll still be Libyans, or do they become Tunisians, or will they just be Palestinians?

Posted by: NC Ref at February 26, 2011 02:08 PM (/izg2)

20 Why do you think the government has been sweeping up all the land

And when they're not doing that they sick Ken Salazar on the states with the gall to open up what is rightly theirs.

/Utahn

Posted by: Stan at February 26, 2011 02:08 PM (dSHKh)

21 No, no peak oil! Peak oil dammit! Pay no attention to the billions of gallons discovered every year behind the curtain!!!!

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at February 26, 2011 02:09 PM (61b7k)

22 So Volkswagen has a working prototype hybrid/diesel that gets 170 mpg
They have a hybrid/diesel Golf in production that gets 65+ mpg
But it's not available here in the USA because the powers that be don't want you to actually be more efficient. Gasoline tax revenues would be too low.

Posted by: Beto at February 26, 2011 02:10 PM (H+LJc)

23 If only there were some use for all these substances we have such an abundance of.  Can natural gas be used to make solar panels?

Just think, if we could extract energy from these substances somehow, we might not have to worry so much when a Libya, say, suffers internal upheaval.

Ahh, but then I forgot about the SUFR - Strategic Unicorn Fart Reserve.

The country's in the best of hands.

Posted by: FUBAR at February 26, 2011 02:10 PM (McG46)

24 Thank you, TexasJew!

Posted by: fluffy, petroleum consumer at February 26, 2011 02:13 PM (4Kl5M)

25 I would like some de-BS'ification about the issue of "fracking" polluting aquafers (the water table).  I know the gas in question is thousands of feet below the water table, but does that mean it's under too much pressure and rock to ever just travel up?  That fracking can't be done without precautions?  That fracking can't be done near where people have water wells?  What's the deal?

Posted by: ParisParamus at February 26, 2011 02:14 PM (bgSjf)

26 Yay, Barnett Shale! I run title out there. More drilling please. Shameless pandering done for the day.

Posted by: TexMex at February 26, 2011 02:14 PM (FPDoI)

27 And don't you think that China wouldn't kill all of us to get at it. Exceptin the women. China needs women.

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 02:16 PM (Q6tnr)

28 Enough of this! Who is playing at the White House tonight. Michelle needs to get her groove on!

Posted by: gesc at February 26, 2011 02:18 PM (AIIyH)

29 26 Yay, Barnett Shale! I run title out there. More drilling please.

You drink their gasshake.

Posted by: ParisParamus at February 26, 2011 02:18 PM (bgSjf)

30 We could totally own this whole energy game, except for the crapweasels in DC and the fact that, well, it would just be so unfair.  TJ's been braving the truly inhospitable weather in North Dak doing this very thing.  And, hey, let's just forget about offshore drilling and the fuckin ANWR. 

Posted by: Peaches at February 26, 2011 02:19 PM (zxpIo)

31 That whole Bakken area is a known nesting ground for the endangered Red Breasted Turkey Grouse.  I don't see as there is any way possible that we could go in there and disrupt this vital habitat.

Posted by: Eco Libtard at February 26, 2011 02:20 PM (yQWNf)

32 the endangered Red Breasted Turkey Grouse.

Honey badger say, make mine a double!

Posted by: Peaches at February 26, 2011 02:22 PM (zxpIo)

33 Natural gas is produced thousands of feet below the water table.  Gasland is the vapor that accompanies bullshit.

Posted by: huerfano at February 26, 2011 02:22 PM (2pEj7)

34

Why do I get so many extra lines between my paragraphs?

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at February 26, 2011 06:54 PM (rQ2EG)

Because you're special.

Enjoy the ride on the short bus.

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 26, 2011 02:22 PM (7+pP9)

35 Enjoy the ride on the short bus.
Posted by: Ed Anger

Oooo, flame war.

Posted by: goldbricker esq at February 26, 2011 02:24 PM (S59+B)

36

Posted by: huerfano at February 26, 2011 07:22 PM (2pEj7)

A serious answer would be nice.  Just because it's initially below, doesn't mean it will stay below if enough rock is broken.  I want to be able to respond intelligently, and with confidence to all my libtard amis...


Posted by: ParisParamus at February 26, 2011 02:25 PM (bgSjf)

37 I grew up around the oil business. Everyone I knew made their living offshore. If this administration wanted to get some good jobs for this country they only need to look to the oilfield jobs. But, they will not and it is a shame because they are good paying jobs and the industries who service the oilfields would employ so many people.

Posted by: gesc at February 26, 2011 02:26 PM (AIIyH)

38 Living in a world where Salazar can wear a cowboy hat bothers me more than Obama with a flag pin.

Posted by: Ex-Republican genius at February 26, 2011 02:31 PM (le5qc)

39 I live in the center of the Marcellus gas field. The local MBM fervently pushes the luddite anti-fracking memes. I expect the idiots to prevail.

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 26, 2011 02:32 PM (7+pP9)

40 What is the 411 on the guaranteed loans to Brazil for deep-water production. I insist someone puts me some knowledge.

Kyle Busch, bitches

Posted by: Ex-Republican genius at February 26, 2011 02:33 PM (le5qc)

41 Oooo, flame war.

Posted by: goldbricker

 

Careful.  There's a lot of gas around here.

Posted by: Reader C.J. Burch writes..... at February 26, 2011 02:33 PM (sJTmU)

42

A serious answer would be nice.  Just because it's initially below, doesn't mean it will stay below if enough rock is broken.  I want to be able to respond intelligently, and with confidence to all my libtard amis...


Posted by: ParisParamus at February 26, 2011 07:25 PM

They pump sand and water down at high pressure.  The tubing is cemented in and gas does not escape.  This is a pretty fair description of the techniques used.


Posted by: huerfano at February 26, 2011 02:33 PM (2pEj7)

43 There's also an interesting claim from Italy about cold fusion. Search for Focardi and Rossi for more info. Yes, I know not to get my hopes up, but it hasn't yet reached Steorn levels of implausibility.

Posted by: The Chap in the Deerstalker Cap at February 26, 2011 02:35 PM (wb/re)

44 If gas is 6 or 7 bucks a gallon in 2012, and prices of everything that has to be moved goes up along with electricity bills, and it causes Honey Badger's poll numbers to indicate he could lose ...

Then he'll announce that he's tapping into the Strategic Reserve and taxing Windfall Profits.

The MBM will announce that he's just won re-election with that move

If I have to relive any decade, WHY THE FUCKING 70's !!!

Posted by: kbdabear at February 26, 2011 02:35 PM (vdfwz)

45 I think you will be pleasantly surprised there Ed. Pennsy is sick of dying, might be high time to come back up there. You are there, you don't see the differences I am seeing, going up to Columbia County a few times a year. Things are changing for the better. Our neighbors actually SEE a future up there! They won't give that up for some silliness.

Posted by: BlackOrchid at February 26, 2011 02:36 PM (SB0V2)

46 I support stuffing several hundred environmentalists down each well so they can study the problems close-hand.

Because I care about my environment.

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 02:36 PM (Q6tnr)

47 @38 That's why if we can elect the right conservatives in 2012, they're going to look like economic geniuses. Energy jobs are great jobs. Just cut the energy industry loose and watch the rebound happen in record time. Also as energy costs go down so will other costs. We'll be well into inflation by that time and lowering energy costs will help. We've also got to stop using food (corn) for fuel and defund all green nonsense. Hopefully, if the Reps have both houses they'll have the balls to cut taxes across the board.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 26, 2011 02:37 PM (I49Jm)

48 Algore always gets applause and laughs from his cultists by claiming that oil shale is like the junkie who sifts through dirt to get the coke spilled in there out of it for his fix.

He must have been watching his son in action when he came up with that analogy

Posted by: kbdabear at February 26, 2011 02:37 PM (vdfwz)

49
Oooo, flame war.

Posted by: goldbricker esq at February 26, 2011 07:24 PM (S59+B)

I admit it was a senseless cheap shot.

Gotta point?

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 26, 2011 02:37 PM (7+pP9)

50

One of the big problems is what to do with the frakking water that comes back up out of the hole.  Sometimes it is just dumped into a holding pond, and that's where the trouble begins. Then some of this crud can get into the water table or the watershed around the area of work (for instance, into the Susquehanna watershed in the Marcellus shale area of work).

There is a new treatment technology afoot where the frakking water gets cleaned up as it comes back up out of da hole.  Pretty soon this will be standard at every drilling site.

Posted by: Reader C.J. Burch writes..... at February 26, 2011 02:39 PM (sJTmU)

51 Fischer-Tropsch oil from coal, cheapest of all.

Posted by: tarpon at February 26, 2011 02:40 PM (g0QB8)

52 47- I support stuffing several hundred environmentalists down each well so they can study the problems close-hand. I second that!

Posted by: gesc at February 26, 2011 02:40 PM (AIIyH)

53

A serious answer would be nice.  Just because it's initially below, doesn't mean it will stay below if enough rock is broken.  I want to be able to respond intelligently, and with confidence to all my libtard amis...

 

They've been fracking here in OK for years and I haven't heard of any contaminations of aquifers or wells.  There were a few complaints about contamintion in northwest OK, but most of it turned out to be false.  The big contaminator of wells in OK is when gyp water seeps down from above into the deeper drilled wells.  Gyp water is some nasty shit.  The cows won't even drink it. 

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 02:41 PM (+yLk4)

54 Gotta point?
Posted by: Ed Anger

No, just bored. Got brains?!   OOoo burn! ... Yeah, well... anyway.

Posted by: goldbricker esq at February 26, 2011 02:41 PM (S59+B)

55 Doesn't matter.  When you have a President that inherently believes that every resource, from natural to human resources, are limited you will inevitably end up with shortages of everything from natural resources to human resources.  (See the Carter Administration.)

In contrast when you have a President that believes in the unlimited God given ability of humans and their ability to properly conserve their dominion over the earth you end up with a surplus in every area of life.  (See the Reagan Administration.)
DKK


Posted by: LifeTrek at February 26, 2011 02:43 PM (0jXyB)

56 Like a circle in a spiral
Like a wheel within a wheel
Never ending or beginning
On an ever-spinning reel
As the images unwind
Like the circles that you find
In the windmills of your mind!

Posted by: Joe "Ole Blue Eyes" Biden at February 26, 2011 02:45 PM (vdfwz)

57 Greetings: Back in the '70s, I was working on a minor in Economics. I had a professor who was an admitted Marxist. One day, the centerpiece of his lecture was that, at any point in time, the oil industry could declare that there was only 15 years worth of oil supply left. He went on to explain that this was true because the oil industry didn't need any more than a 15 year supply. That was adequate time to locate, extract, and manufacture the beneficial derivatives of that bubbling crude. To find more would provide no real economic benefit to them or their customers.

Posted by: 11B40 at February 26, 2011 02:48 PM (LBm17)

58

There is a new treatment technology afoot where the frakking water gets cleaned up as it comes back up out of da hole.  Pretty soon this will be standard at every drilling site.

 

In OK we extract all the salt water that comes up and then repump it back down into old abandoned oil wells.  No fuss, no muss.  (And we have a lot of old abandoned oil wells)

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 02:49 PM (+yLk4)

59 Peak Oil!  Any minute now.  Yep. 

Posted by: The 70's at February 26, 2011 02:52 PM (9v3vw)

60 I am beginning to think that oil isn't a fossil fuel after all, it is some other process and the earth continually creates it.

Posted by: Guy Fawkes at February 26, 2011 02:52 PM (xdHzq)

61 ""I support stuffing several hundred environmentalists down each well so they can study the problems close-hand. ""


Fuck that, make the hole big enough and throw them all in, and save algore's fat ass last for the plug.

Posted by: Berserker at February 26, 2011 02:52 PM (gWHrG)

62

If we had a real President in the White House he would be out there himself manning the rigs.

This would solve so many of our problems. unfortunately we do'nt have a real President. We have a long-legged Mack Daddy instead

Posted by: martha at February 26, 2011 02:52 PM (kFsTd)

63 n OK we extract all the salt water that comes up and then repump it back down into old abandoned oil wells.  No fuss, no muss.  (And we have a lot of old abandoned oil wells) Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 07:49 PM

Same deal in NM.  The flowback water goes into a lined pit and is then hauled to a disposal, usually an injection well.

Posted by: huerfano at February 26, 2011 02:52 PM (2pEj7)

64 To be honest, I do care about the environment but not to the extent that I value my head on my shoulders. I say DRILL and now. As long as we are dependent on the middle east for our oil we are only a short time away from what? I think we are seeing what - right now. Where does this end?

Posted by: gesc at February 26, 2011 02:53 PM (AIIyH)

65

If we had a real President in the White House he would be out there himself manning the rigs.

This would solve so many of our problems. unfortunately we do'nt have a real President. We have a long-legged Mack Daddy instead

Posted by: martha at February 26, 2011 07:52 PM

Sorry, I have to put on my comfortable shoes and walk the picket line first. 

Plus, I don't think I have a hardhat head.

Posted by: Barry Obama at February 26, 2011 02:54 PM (2pEj7)

66 64 - Mack Daddy! I love that pastor that said that but I forget his name.

Posted by: gesc at February 26, 2011 02:55 PM (AIIyH)

67  I am beginning to think that oil isn't a fossil fuel after all, it is some other process and the earth continually creates it.

Posted by: Guy Fawkes at February 26, 2011 07:52 PM (xdHzq)

 

That idea is growing too.  Rush has talked about it a couple of times.

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 02:56 PM (+yLk4)

68

A serious answer would be nice.  Just because it's initially below, doesn't mean it will stay below if enough rock is broken.  I want to be able to respond intelligently, and with confidence to all my libtard amis...


Posted by: ParisParamus at February 26, 2011 07:25 PM (bgSjf)

One key thing they miss is WHERE we are doing this.  If you look at the Shale areas in Western Colorado... there aint nothin out there but miles of nothing...

Also, while there IS some possibility of contamination, there is already Natural contamination happening.... with the oversite that will be on these areas, they will probably end of cleaner than if we had left it to Mom Nature (who does seem to like dirt... /smile)

Posted by: Romeo13 at February 26, 2011 02:56 PM (agOaL)

69 62 I am beginning to think that oil isn't a fossil fuel after all, it is some other process and the earth continually creates it.

Posted by: Guy Fawkes

A lot of planetary geologist think there was a huge amount of methane trapped in the Earth's crust when the plant was formed.  This has been seeping up to the surface for literally billions of years.  This is what we keep getting when we drill down.  There is still a tremendous amount of methane to be recovered.

 Makes you wonder if there is a natural  process that changes some of that methane into long chain and polyaromatic  hydrocarbons,  like oil.

Posted by: Reader C.J. Burch writes..... at February 26, 2011 03:00 PM (sJTmU)

70 No, just bored. Got brains?!   OOoo burn! ... Yeah, well... anyway.

Posted by: goldbricker esq at February 26, 2011 07:41 PM (S59+B)

Ummmm.... brainsssss....

Posted by: Zombie Bill Murray... or is it... at February 26, 2011 03:00 PM (agOaL)

71

To be honest, I do care about the environment but not to the extent that I value my head on my shoulders. I say DRILL and now. As long as we are dependent on the middle east for our oil we are only a short time away from what? I think we are seeing what - right now. Where does this end?

 

I don't think there's a conservative alive that doesn't want a clean enviroment.  The difference between us is that first, we love humanity too, and second, we have a practical end to the lengths we'll go to keep our surroundings clean and still have a viable energy policy. 

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:02 PM (+yLk4)

72 We need to get a second opinion on this.  Find me a Harvard graduate, stat!

Posted by: Fritz at February 26, 2011 03:05 PM (/8mBu)

73 Too bad Jugears McFuckstick won't let us tap any of it.

Posted by: Sponge at February 26, 2011 03:06 PM (CdX98)

74

Makes you wonder if there is a natural  process that changes some of that methane into long chain and polyaromatic  hydrocarbons,  like oil.

 

High heat, high pressure, no oxygen.  No telling what's going on deep deep below us.  Geologists can only speculate.

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:08 PM (+yLk4)

75 O/T:  I have been reading posts like "thanks to the good people of WI, the GOP is in retreat" and stuff like that.  Did I miss something today?

Posted by: curious at February 26, 2011 03:08 PM (p302b)

76 Production water rarely contanimates local aquifers or surface water- the pits are engineered not to spill, they're lined and every site has a spill plan (costing 10s of 1000s to write, and is closely monitored), even out in the west where there aren't any surface streams to contaiminate. That nearby wash might only have water running in it once every 100 years- but there's a spill plan like it's back east. They can't be abandoned without an engineered pit closure and monitoring.  l

Posted by: fedupwithit at February 26, 2011 03:10 PM (FF5on)

77
>>I support stuffing several hundred environmentalists down each well so they can study the problems close-hand...


We have more oil inside our borders, than all the other proven reserves on earth.. Here are the official estimates:

8-times as much oil as Saudi Arabia
18-times as much oil as Iraq
21-times as much oil as Kuwait
22-times as much oil as Iran
500-times as much oil as Yemen
..and it's all right here in the Western United States .

HOW can this BE? HOW can we NOT BE extracting this? Because the environmentalists and others have blocked all efforts to help America become independent of foreign oil! Again, we are letting a small group of people dictate our lives and our economy..... WHY?

We've got more oil in this very compact area (Montana’s Bakken Formation) than the entire Middle East. More than 2 TRILLION barrels untapped. That's more than all the proven oil reserves of crude oil in the world today.

Don't think 'OPEC' will drop its price - even with this find? Think again! It's all about the competitive marketplace.. it has to. Think OPEC just might be funding the environmentalists?

It's all here.

For years, U. S. oil exploration has been considered a dead end. Even the 'Big Oil' companies gave up searching for major oil wells decades ago. However, a recent technological breakthrough has opened up the Bakken's massive reserves.... . and we now have access of up to 500 billion barrels. And because this is light, sweet oil, those billions of barrels will cost Americans just $16 PER BARREL! That's enough crude to fully fuel the American economy for 2041 years straight.


Posted by: sickinmass at February 26, 2011 03:13 PM (1rflU)

78 Re: 77 I haven't heard anything like that in my neck of the woods (northern Virginia)- sounds like wishcasting to me.

Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 03:14 PM (3kefp)

79

Long time lurker, first time poster.  No link-fu skills.

In answer to ParisParamus regarding hydraulic fracturing (:fraccing):

Shale formations are composed of sediments, mostly fine-grained silts and clays that were deposited in deep-water, still environments.  Most contain some amount of organic matter.  As the sediments are buried over geologic time (millions of years), the weight of the overlying sediments and the heat generated by the decay of the organic material and the earth's core casue the sediments to compact.  Because of the fine size of the silts and the clay minerals, the shales become impermeable to flow over a reasonable time.  They become barriers to flow.

When a well if hydraulically fractured, the process is designed and controlled to extend the fracture upwards from the point of origin through the subject formation and outward from the wellbore to provide a larger, higher permeability region (the fracture itself) for the fluid (gas, water or oil) to flow.  Fracture intervals are usually on the order of tens of feet thick, and multiple fractures may be performed in a wellbore to extend the range.  For the well to be economic, there must be sufficient pressure, which is a function of depth, for the gas to flow at commercial rates.  Thus, the formations are usually thousands of feet (one to three miles) below the surface.

Fresh water aquifers are usually less than 500 feet deep.  As you go deeper, the water becomes saltier, generally, because the fresh rainwater has not replaced the saltier seawater that was originally laid down with the sediments (there are exceptions).  Between the aquifer and the shale zone of interest are additional layers, just like a layer cake, alternating between porous and permeable zones and impermeable shales.  If the fracture would break out of one zone, it would not pass through all of the other impermeable zones between it and the aquifer.  Thus, the gas is held in place by the caprock(s).

Hope this wasn't too wordy.

Posted by: jett rink at February 26, 2011 03:18 PM (AEfsC)

80

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 08:02 PM (+yLk4)

Yeppers... USE, not ABUSE...

I was a member of the Sierra Club, as my Father was, for many years... right up until they 'went off the reservation' and started the Luddite stuff.

I've probably cleaned up more areas, and picked up more trash, than the vast majority of 'environmentalist' who go to protests....

Posted by: Romeo13 at February 26, 2011 03:19 PM (agOaL)

81 If you like your extra lines between paragraphs, you can keep them.

Posted by: President Barky is On Top of It, Kids at February 26, 2011 03:20 PM (p0Wf1)

82

Hope this wasn't too wordy.

Posted by: jett rink

Very informative, thanks. And welcome!

Posted by: MissTammy at February 26, 2011 03:21 PM (BebB7)

83

Hope this wasn't too wordy.

Posted by: jett rink

Nope, it was very well done. Thanks.

Posted by: goldbricker esq at February 26, 2011 03:22 PM (S59+B)

84 And another thing- to think that all these years I thought that "frakking" was just a euphemism for "fucking". Turns out it's actually a technical term related to gas drilling. The things you learn on a Saturday night at AoSHQ!!

Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 03:22 PM (3kefp)

85

Hope this wasn't too wordy.

Posted by: jett rink at February 26, 2011 08:18 PM (AEfsC)

Not at all.  In contrast, I believe my 1st post was a Tony Montana sock.  In other words, at least you brought some good knowledge and insight to the table. Welcome.

 

Paid 3.24 a gallon today.  What are other morons paying?

Bronx Tale on Spike if anyone is interested btw.

 

Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 03:23 PM (dWPyO)

86

The big contaminator of wells in OK is when gyp water seeps down from above into the deeper drilled wells.  Gyp water is some nasty shit.  The cows won't even drink it. 

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 07:41 PM (+yLk4)

Same here in PA. Lots of the drill sites have shallow strata full of gas. Some people have always been able to take a jar full of water from their farm pond, cap it, shake it, uncap it and burn the gas from it.

But now they can sue over it.

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 26, 2011 03:25 PM (7+pP9)

87

Posted by: sickinmass at February 26, 2011 08:13 PM (1rflU)

 

Bakkan, ANWR, Colorado, etc., even here in southeast OK there's a shelf of shale that hasn't been fully explored yet.  These and the largesse that's offshore are only the "known" reserves.  Who knows what we'd find if DC would just let the energy companies untie just one of their hands.   

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:25 PM (+yLk4)

88 $2.99

Posted by: Al Gore at February 26, 2011 03:25 PM (xTSet)

89

Bakkan, ANWR, Colorado, etc., even here in southeast OK there's a shelf of shale that hasn't been fully explored yet.  These and the largesse that's offshore are only the "known" reserves.  Who knows what we'd find if DC would just let the energy companies untie just one of their hands.   

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 08:25 PM (+yLk4)

 

Oh yeah, I almost forgot.  All this and an almost limitless supply of coal. 

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:27 PM (+yLk4)

90 ""I am beginning to think that oil isn't a fossil fuel after all, it is some other process and the earth continually creates it.""

Reminds me of an argument I had from an evirowhacko. He said something about how the oil we pull from the ground is like sucking an engine crankcase dry of oil, and maybe the earth needs the oil where it is. I asked him where you could even get proof of a theory like that.

So being the typical leftist with no answers, he asks ME to prove him wrong. At that point I said all i can prove is T-rex existed, because one dropped a big turd and its standing in front of me talking.

Posted by: Berserker at February 26, 2011 03:27 PM (gWHrG)

91 Oh, and if that coal is gassy, then there is coal-bed methane, which was the hot commodity several years ago in northeastern oklahoma.  Too deep to mine, but the gas was economic to produce, after fracturing.

Posted by: jett rink at February 26, 2011 03:29 PM (AEfsC)

92 Reminds me of an argument I had from an evirowhacko. He said something about how the oil we pull from the ground is like sucking an engine crankcase dry of oil, and maybe the earth needs the oil where it is. I asked him where you could even get proof of a theory like that.


and they call US the stupid ones

Posted by: coughing chemjeff at February 26, 2011 03:29 PM (GaLxs)

93 $3.16 at the WalMart site when you use their "gift card". However, Florence has it even cheaper at $3.06 right now. That is because that is the pipeline terminus.

That is why it is higher down there in Charleston. The further you get from that terminus, the higher it gets due to transport costs.

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 03:29 PM (M9Ie6)

94 Do ya'll think that most libs even understand the trickle down affect of high gas prices? We ship all our product all over the country and our prices include shipping. We have to absorb the cost this shipping season because we already quoted prices. But, if diesel is this high or higher next year we have to go up on our prices so that will trickle down to our customers and then to their customers. I swear sometimes I just don't think that some people don't realize that small business people have to take so many risks. Some people think that if you own ANY type of business you are rich. I hate them and I hate that I am hating them more and more every single day.

Posted by: gesc at February 26, 2011 03:30 PM (AIIyH)

95 Sorry, but I'm too busy drilling Americans in the ass to drill for oil.

Posted by: Barry Soetero at February 26, 2011 03:30 PM (zgZzy)

96 Great post and thread, 'cept for reminding about the gov's everlasting buy-up of land. I was shocked when I learned of how much they "owned" in the 90's, and even with the year-after-year deficits, they have been acquiring more.
The abiogenic theory of petroleum is damn interesting too.
Is it too late for a mid-forties guy to go to WY or ND and find work with an oil company, starting at the bottom? I've been in metal fab and rigging and CAD since college. One of the ME's I worked with in my 20's worked as a mud man in Montana, and I loved the stories, mostly about punchups after the 6th month of winter, REALLY cold weather, and general 4x4 lawlessness.I'm kind of attached to my fingers, though, and he said roughnecks lose them frequently.

Posted by: Buck O. Phive at February 26, 2011 03:30 PM (HwIdb)

97

 All this and an almost limitless supply of coal. 

Oh, at the rate we are using it, we have an umlimited supply.

Posted by: garrett at February 26, 2011 03:31 PM (xTSet)

98 Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 08:23 PM (dWPyO)

You may be interested in this site:

http://tinyurl.com/6ksa86m

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 03:32 PM (M9Ie6)

99 ""and they call US the stupid ones""


well after Rosie announced on TV that 9/11 was a fake because its the first time in history fire melted steel I knew right there that leftist really means reverse polarity, they came wired wrong, they talk with their ass and shit with their mouth.

Posted by: Berserker at February 26, 2011 03:33 PM (gWHrG)

100

Posted by: jett rink at February 26, 2011 08:18 PM (AEfsC)

 

I like the nic.  And, yes, I know where it's from.  Happier days. 

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:33 PM (+yLk4)

101 That is why it is higher down there in Charleston. The further you get from that terminus, the higher it gets due to transport costs.

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 08:29 PM (M9Ie6)

Hey, interesting Vic.  You been getting good weather the last few weeks?  Been great down in these parts.  Hit 70 today.

Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 03:33 PM (dWPyO)

102 There is some evidence of abiogenic (or basin-centered) gas, but not so much for oil.  It comes from dead sea creatures that die and fall to the bottom of deep, oxygen-poor environments and is buried, compressed and cooked over very long periods.  A Dr. Gold was a big proponent of abiogenic gas back in the 80's and got someone to spend a lot of money on a deep well in Scandinavia (I think), without finding more than a puff of gas.

Posted by: jett rink at February 26, 2011 03:33 PM (AEfsC)

103 Hey, interesting Vic.  You been getting good weather the last few weeks?  Been great down in these parts.  Hit 70 today.

Its been going up and down. Today it was 66°, yesterday 74°. tomorrow it is supposed to get to 77°

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 03:35 PM (M9Ie6)

104 Posted by: Berserker at February 26, 2011 08:27 PM (gWHrG) LOL! I really think that a large part of the leftists' idiocy stems from the fact that they really have no idea of how BIG the world actually is. If they were forced to got out of their metropolitan apartments, sail out in a small boat, and spend a week or so out of sight of land I think they would get a much more accurate perspective of the size of the natural world, and by contrast their own smallness and insignificance. Then again they have been trained from birth to believe that the universe revolves around them and the sun shines out their asses so it may take a long time for them to absorb the lesson.

Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 03:35 PM (3kefp)

105 Why would we want gas or oil? They will prevent us from achieving the progressive dream of everyone huddled, cold and poor but equal, in the Lord of the Manor's great hall, as we melt into one community. At one with nature and knowing our place before the State and the King. A feudal ambition.

Posted by: George Orwell at February 26, 2011 03:35 PM (AZGON)

106

You may be interested in this site:

Thanks.  Where I'm at is a bit higher than further inland.  North Charleston runs around 5 cents cheaper in seems.

Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 03:36 PM (dWPyO)

107 a/s/l/regular unleaded price 48/m/nj/$3.09

Posted by: Pecos Bill at February 26, 2011 03:36 PM (j84s0)

108 I want to see 1 dollar a gallon gasoline.

Posted by: Holger at February 26, 2011 03:36 PM (YxGud)

109 Just ask your local envirodouche: crude oil is all-natural, coming from the earth loaded with organic goodness...what's your fucking problem, bitch?

Posted by: model_1066 at February 26, 2011 03:36 PM (opY6O)

110

Posted by: Buck O. Phive at February 26, 2011 08:30 PM (HwIdb)

 

Think you could drive an 18-wheeler?  Why don't you investigate that.  Lots and lots of trucks in the oil patch. 

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:37 PM (+yLk4)

111 I have always maintained that there are three kinds of "greens". The most prevalent type is the watermelon, green on the outside, red on the inside.

Green is just another racket to push international communism. The second largest block is the anarchists. The simply want to destroy all civilization so they can watch the world burn.

The smallest group are the actual true believers. They are just shithouse nuts.

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 03:39 PM (M9Ie6)

112 ref Abiogenic oil (or, oil don't come from dinosaurs...) Since it gets hotter and hotter the deeper you go, after a while it seems unlikely that oil would be... you know, OIL after being subjected to very high temperatures for hundreds of millions (or 1-4 billion) years. Yeah, I know it won't catch fire without oxygen but it's a batch of complex chemicals and ya think they'd degrade after REALLY long periods of high temperature. So I don't think you'll find oil 100 miles down. (btw, this isn't my idea. I read it somewhere else and I just typed up what I remembered of it)

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at February 26, 2011 03:39 PM (rQ2EG)

113 About the cheapest today in southern Clownifornia around me was regular for $3.71 per gallon. Much higher in the central parts of LA.

Posted by: George Orwell at February 26, 2011 03:40 PM (AZGON)

114 North Charleston runs around 5 cents cheaper in seems.

Sometimes that site runs behind by a day so if the price is changing rapidly it can get behind.

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 03:40 PM (M9Ie6)

115 ""LOL! I really think that a large part of the leftists' idiocy stems from the fact that they really have no idea of how BIG the world actually is.""


Thats exactly what I always say. The problem is they have an over active case of self importance, as if the planet actually gives a shit about them. Then there is their sheer arrogance to even think they can control the planet. Everything is control with them, they think because they wish it it happens, and if they think it it must be true.

They don't have a clue what a microscopic little worthless piece of dust they are in the grand scheme of the planet, not to mention the galaxy, or universe.

Posted by: Berserker at February 26, 2011 03:40 PM (gWHrG)

116 Anyone know how to contact dri and tell him he got trolled by snopes?


Posted by: Gundo at February 26, 2011 03:41 PM (/n3ct)

117 Yeah, I know it won't catch fire without oxygen but it's a batch of complex chemicals and ya think they'd degrade after REALLY long periods of high temperature. So I don't think you'll find oil 100 miles down.

but we only observe it here on the surface where it's not really hot

Posted by: coughing chemjeff at February 26, 2011 03:41 PM (GaLxs)

118  I want to see 1 dollar a gallon gasoline.

Posted by: Holger at February 26, 2011 08:36 PM (YxGud)

Well you might be able to get some uranium from the Libyans now for the Delorean.  Try 1997. 

I remember moving out to San Diego some 10 years ago and freaking out because gas was around 1.60 a gallon. 

 

 

Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 03:42 PM (dWPyO)

119 Just ask your local envirodouche: crude oil is all-natural, coming from the earth loaded with organic goodness...what's your fucking problem, bitch?


I need this in bumpersticker format.

Posted by: HeatherRadish at February 26, 2011 03:42 PM (nAOMZ)

120 Thats exactly what I always say. The problem is they have an over active case of self importance, as if the planet actually gives a shit about them. Perfect time to google "George Carlin environment youtube." The guy got that one spot on.

Posted by: George Orwell at February 26, 2011 03:42 PM (AZGON)

121

@114

There is a temperature range for oil formation, known as the oil window.  Less temperature, no cooking.  Too much heat, degraded oil.  May be a tar mat, may just be missing fractions, as the light ones cook off first.

Posted by: jett rink at February 26, 2011 03:42 PM (AEfsC)

122 Ref the dri being trolled. http://www.snopes.com/lost/false.asp Snopes' smartass way of describing False Authority Syndrome.

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at February 26, 2011 03:42 PM (rQ2EG)

123 110 I want to see 1 dollar a gallon gasoline.

no fucking shit
I am not old enough to remember 25 cent gas, but I do remember 89 cent gas

bahh makes me miss the 90's

Posted by: coughing chemjeff at February 26, 2011 03:43 PM (GaLxs)

124 Thanks, Soona
I never thought about that. As I've always been designing or making metal parts, I was stuck on the fact that they probably have every gantry, fitting, or flange already available to them for the last 90 years.
It would have to have knobby tires, though.

Posted by: Buck O. Phive at February 26, 2011 03:43 PM (HwIdb)

125  I want to see 1 dollar a gallon gasoline.

Posted by: Holger at February 26, 2011 08:36 PM (YxGud)

 

When I started college in '67 there were two gas stations near campus on one of the main roads in town.  They had about an ten month gas war where for the last five months one station was selling gas for 10 cents a gallon and the other 5 cents a gallon.

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:44 PM (+yLk4)

126
Its been going up and down. Today it was 66°, yesterday 74°. tomorrow it is supposed to get to 77°

Whut are dem - Angstrom degrees?

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 26, 2011 03:44 PM (7+pP9)

127 Holy shit! It just snowed in Burbank.

Is Algore in town?

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 03:45 PM (Q6tnr)

128 Whut are dem - Angstrom degrees?

yeah they're very very tiny degrees
man it must be cold where Vic is, being almost absolute zero and all

Posted by: coughing chemjeff at February 26, 2011 03:46 PM (GaLxs)

129 Hey, I'm so old I remember seeing gas for less than thirty cents per gallon near the Washington/Idaho border when I was a very wee Orwell.

Posted by: George Orwell at February 26, 2011 03:46 PM (AZGON)

130 129 Holy shit! It just snowed in Burbank.

Is Algore in town?

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 08:45 PM (Q6tnr)

No.... Hell... froze over...

hmmmm....

Posted by: Romeo13 at February 26, 2011 03:47 PM (agOaL)

131

Sometimes that site runs behind by a day so if the price is changing rapidly it can get behind

Oh ok.  I know generally if I hold off until I get inland it's usually cheaper. MP is a bit more expensive it seems.

In other news, I mixed in some Bojangles tonight.  I'm not missing Denver on a night like this. Shorts weather.

 

Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 03:47 PM (dWPyO)

132 Whut are dem - Angstrom degrees? Tiny filthy Scandi wavelengths. Like tiny filthy Scandi dicks.

Posted by: George Orwell at February 26, 2011 03:48 PM (AZGON)

133 I have always maintained that there are three kinds of "greens".

You forgot the fourth, largest group: Unwitting dupes. Don't have the brains to realize the watermelons are lying to them, but really really want to feel good about caring.  And really want other people to see them caring.

Someday I'm going to get kicked out of a quilt show for pointing out to some dumb scrunt that every piece of her "green" quilt was delivered by diesel-powered vehicles (especially the imported organic cotton and oil-based polyster thread).

Posted by: HeatherRadish at February 26, 2011 03:48 PM (nAOMZ)

134 Oh dear, sifty... you are near me.

Posted by: George Orwell at February 26, 2011 03:48 PM (AZGON)

135 Serious question:

Is oil still forming?

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 03:49 PM (Q6tnr)

136 They don't have a clue what a microscopic little worthless piece of dust they are in the grand scheme of the planet, not to mention the galaxy, or universe. Posted by: Berserker at February 26, 2011 08:40 PM (gWHrG) I remember reading somewhere that one of the most important lessons the United States Naval Academy sought to impress upon its graduates is summed up in the phrase (and I'm misquoting here) "How vast is the ocean, and how small is my ship". Internalizing that lesson requires a level of humility that a leftist is incapable of attaining.

Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 03:50 PM (3kefp)

137 Scary huh?

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 03:50 PM (Q6tnr)

138

 but really really want to feel good about caring And really want other people to see them caring.

This.  Also called status whoring.



Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 03:50 PM (dWPyO)

139

129  Holy shit! It just snowed in Burbank

low 80's and sunny here again...so boring

oh well

Posted by: animaicsjoe at February 26, 2011 03:50 PM (pYurd)

140 Humanity is a very small flea on the back of a very large elephant. On a good day, maybe, the elephant feels an itch.

If it even knows where we are I am sure it knows how to get rid of us if it needs to.

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 03:51 PM (Q6tnr)

141 I am not old enough to remember 25 cent gas, but I do remember 89 cent gas

The first gas I bought for my own vehicle was at 41 cents a gal. What was funny was it was for a motor cycle that held only 2.5 gallons so I could fill up on less than a dollar. I remember it being in the mid 30s and the occasional "gas war" where stations would duke it out for customers with the price getting down to 10 cents.

However, that $1 then would be $5.79 now, so gas is actually cheaper.

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 03:52 PM (M9Ie6)

142

But it's not available here in the USA because

 

It doesn't fit our market, size, crashworthy, power, clean diesel US vs EU rules, etc.

Posted by: Dave at February 26, 2011 03:52 PM (6OwZc)

143 no fucking shit
I am not old enough to remember 25 cent gas, but I do remember 89 cent gas

bahh makes me miss the 90's
Posted by: coughing chemjeff at February 26, 2011 08:43 PM

I pumped gas at my aunt's little store in the middle of nowhere NM in the early seventies.  The pumps didn't go above 50 cents, so when gas really started to go up, we had to charge by the half gallon.

Posted by: huerfano at February 26, 2011 03:52 PM (2pEj7)

144

damn sock

well with all this oil just waiting to get tapped, president-elect palin and her new husband NCjoe will make the united states great again in just a couple years

Posted by: navycopjoe at February 26, 2011 03:52 PM (pYurd)

145 Ok, AOS bloggers, step right up....

From ABC News:

After playing such a pivotal role in the November elections, Tea Party activists vowed they would keep a close eye on Congress. They weren't kidding.

The Tea Party Patriots, one of the largest organizing groups of the movement, want to assign personal bloggers to track every member of Congress, not just the ones they supported.

The group will launch a recruitment drive this week coinciding with a weekend policy summit being held in Phoenix for state and local coordinators. Shelby Blakely, a stay-at-home mom from eastern Washington state who is organizing the project, said she has little doubt they will be able to round up enough people to tackle a job that she describes as "citizen journalism meets adopt-a-congressman."

"One of the strengths that the Tea Party has is we have a massive army," Blakely said. "We have millions of manpower hours and thousands of people willing to do heavy lifting."

There are already dozens of political and news websites that track the big picture of Congress. Hometown newspapers, TV stations and websites sometimes track individual members of Congress.

The Tea Party Patriots believe a centralized hub for member-by-member blogs would not only hold their Tea Party legislators accountable but would better highlight for voters how non-Tea Party legislators are voting in Washington.

Since bloggers for the Tea Party Patriots would be unpaid volunteers, they wouldn't need to worry about currying favor with legislators, said Tony Tarquinto, a financial adviser from Southern California who will likely blog about a member of the House Ways and Means Committee.

"The traditional media, they want to get close to the (representative) and get the skinny. That's not going to happen with the Tea Party," Tarquinto said. "We're not going to get invited to the Christmas party or get to know them socially.

While Tarquinto said that distance would allow for an objective, factual accounting of each member's performance, Democratic consultant Steve Elmendorf said such objectivity is unlikely since each Tea Party blogger would view each congressman's actions through the filter of the Tea Party principles. "They're trying to argue a point of view," said Elmendorf, who was an adviser to House Democratic Leader Dick Gephardt.

Posted by: Tami at February 26, 2011 03:52 PM (VuLos)

146 don't these envirodouches realize that other countries don't give a rip about protecting Mother Gaia while they extact all that oil? At least if we were allowed to drill here it would be done a lot cleaner than say Russia does it.
Honey Badger just takes what he wants, he don't give a shit.

Posted by: vaeriax at February 26, 2011 03:53 PM (oCZ9d)

147 I think the lowest I ever paid was around 88 cents.  This would have been circa 1996 or so. 

Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 03:53 PM (dWPyO)

148

Is oil still forming?

Given the theory of how it's formed, I'd say yes.

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 03:54 PM (+yLk4)

149 Environmentalpatients think that a bubble of clean air and unicorn herds will surround North America if we all just start living like pygmies.

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 03:55 PM (Q6tnr)

150 I think the lowest I ever paid was around 88 cents.  This would have been circa 1996 or so.

I paid 80 cents a gallon in Chesterton IN in December 1998.  I remember this because I found the receipt when I sold the car in 2001, when gas was in the $1.80 range and people were freaking out (it was all George Bush's fault, as I recall).

Posted by: HeatherRadish at February 26, 2011 03:56 PM (nAOMZ)

151

i thought you rethugicants got gas for free since you are owned by BIG OIL!!!!!!!11

I LOVE YOU AND YOUR BOOB BELTS MICHELLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11

Posted by: navycopjoe's democrat side fighting free at February 26, 2011 03:56 PM (pYurd)

152 It's both pathetic and very funny how often we hear about "peak oil."  Obviously, a lot of people have an interest in pushing this meme, just as the global moroning people do climate change.


Posted by: ParisParamus at February 26, 2011 03:57 PM (aOpxx)

153 So, oil has theoretically been forming for a long time.

We only really got busy extracting it a couple hundred years ago.

It has never stopped forming.


How come everybody thinks we gonna run out?

Sounds like a fuckin renewable natural resource to me.  Like pine trees and buckwheat.

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 03:57 PM (Q6tnr)

154 Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 08:50 PM (3kefp)

That is the "Breton Fisherman's Prayer". If you have ever been out to sea and look out over the ocean at night you will know how true it is.

Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 03:58 PM (M9Ie6)

155 But I'm simple. There may be sciency shit I don't know.

Posted by: sifty at February 26, 2011 03:59 PM (Q6tnr)

156 That is the "Breton Fisherman's Prayer". If you have ever been out to sea and look out over the ocean at night you will know how true it is. Posted by: Vic at February 26, 2011 08:58 PM (M9Ie6) I have, and I do. Thanks for the reference!

Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 04:00 PM (3kefp)

157 While Tarquinto said that distance would allow for an objective, factual accounting of each member's performance, Democratic consultant Steve Elmendorf said such objectivity is unlikely since each Tea Party blogger would view each congressman's actions through the filter of the Tea Party principles. "They're trying to argue a point of view," said Elmendorf, who was an adviser to House Democratic Leader Dick Gephardt.

Posted by: Tami at February 26, 2011 08:52 PM (VuLos)

 

That's the point, asshole.  These demcrats are just so fucking smart.

Posted by: Soona at February 26, 2011 04:01 PM (+yLk4)

158

155 How come everybody thinks we gonna run out?

http://tinyurl.com/25xmqhb

Posted by: navycopjoe's democrat side fighting free at February 26, 2011 04:01 PM (pYurd)

159

Speaking of gasoline, I've got a hankering for some whiskey. 

 

Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 04:02 PM (dWPyO)

160

i thought you rethugicants got gas for free since you are owned by BIG OIL!!!!!!!11

We do, we''re just trying to help out the folks

Posted by: robtr at February 26, 2011 04:02 PM (hVDig)

161 I happen to work for a large independent in South Texas. Currently the hottest thing in the states is the Eagleford Shale. We just sold our interest in one county for an ungodly amount. Google that one.

Posted by: Jollyroger at February 26, 2011 04:02 PM (hMTSM)

162

@155

It takes millions of years to bury the sediments to sufficient depths to "cook" the oil.  It is a slow process, and the path that the oil takes to get to a reservoir where it is trapped is long and tortuous, and the driving force, the difference is density between oil and water, is slight.  Then we stick a straw into the reservoir and pump the oil out as fast as we can. 

We have been drilling wells for oil since 1849 (the Drake well in Titusville PA).  Since then we have drilled a lot of wells, in places we never dreamed of drilling before. 

So, yes, it is renewable, but not as fast as we are using it.

By the way, we produce between 15 and 50 percent of the oil that is originally in place. YMMV.  There is more oil left behind than is produced.  It just cannot be produced economically beyond that point.  Lots of research dollars are spent chasing that "resource".

Posted by: jett rink at February 26, 2011 04:05 PM (AEfsC)

163 161 Speaking of gasoline, I've got a hankering for some whiskey. Posted by: Delta Smelt at February 26, 2011 09:02 PM (dWPyO) "What gasoline does for the car, Ratzeputz does for the body!" Old marketing slogan, and I swear I have no idea WHY I just remembered it.

Posted by: Nighthawk at February 26, 2011 04:07 PM (3kefp)

164 @164 Absolutely correct. Technology has also progressed where one can go back in to wells and capture more than the original 50%. Subsequent operations just cost more, and therefore in times of cheap oil (early 90s) it just isn't feasible to recover. Thus a lot of wells got plugged even though they knew there was a lot of oil left. But now with 100$ oil....

Posted by: Jollyroger at February 26, 2011 04:14 PM (hMTSM)

165 Interestingly, I have more gas than ever before.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at February 26, 2011 04:17 PM (6yyVB)

166 First time I filled my tank it was 16 cents a gallon.

Posted by: maverick muse at February 26, 2011 04:26 PM (H+LJc)

167 First time I filled my tank it was 16 cents a gallon.

Posted by: maverick muse at February 26, 2011 09:26 PM (H+LJc)

You forgot to say 'get off my lawn'.

Posted by: Truck Monkey at February 26, 2011 04:37 PM (yQWNf)

168 I think texas jew said that abiogenic theory was bs.

Posted by: Uncle Jed at February 26, 2011 04:55 PM (qPTz0)

169 ""First time I filled my tank it was 16 cents a gallon.""

I can't even process that. Was that in the 50's?

Posted by: Berserker at February 26, 2011 05:03 PM (gWHrG)

170

Ahh, but then I forgot about the SUFR - Strategic Unicorn Fart Reserve.

--------------------

That's Strategic Unicorn RAINBOW Fart Reserve. SURFR, dude!

Posted by: Tully at February 26, 2011 05:11 PM (dhKXL)

171 Oh Noes! The U. S. must stop raping Gaia!

Posted by: Ktnxbai *cough* at February 26, 2011 05:15 PM (JzqKn)

172 Suck it bitches....


Just try to drill.

Posted by: BHO, supreme comfoter of Gaia and all things Union at February 26, 2011 05:37 PM (uORry)

173 Here is a funny thing.  I got interested in Shale, cuz I didn't know what the hell it was, and syngas when I was about 13, I couldn't have been much older, it was a movie about a bunch of Vampire bats flying out of a cave in such volume they are killing cattle and people.

And then (I think) lou diamond phillips goes into the cave of his indian ancestors and sets it on fire.

That's the movie.

but after that (I know it was pre-95 because I have particular historical benchmarks that let me know an approximate timeline) I was curious as to if oil from shale was true.  I learned that it was, hell, it's a concept that goes back almost 100 years now.  Later, I was curious about syngas made from dirty oil (which is really all that coal and shale are) and If LauraW remembers, she might validate it, I became rather well informed on it, for a curious amateur.  (It was the first ever "tip" I sent her.)

Tapping into shale, Is, to quote "sherrif joe," A big fucking deal.  We could surpass SA if our efficiency is even remotely valid.

Posted by: Douglas at February 26, 2011 06:32 PM (YKOnu)

174 nice work.plz keep it away.happy new year.

Posted by: maplestory mesos at February 26, 2011 10:53 PM (YLorm)

175 I saw a story in the Terre Haute paper just yesterday about a new oil gusher in Vigo County here in Indiana. They think this will produce about a thousand barrels a day. It is part of an effort by a farm co-op to find new energy supplies...this started in 2008 and they have already drilled several wells in the area. They did say their break even for this area was $50 a barrel..but we are well beyond that now.

I was surprised. I am from Oklahoma and I grew up around wells. My Dad was a roughneck many years and later went to work for an oil tool company, but somehow I did not expect to see oil wells being drilled in southwestern Indiana.

Posted by: Terrye at February 27, 2011 02:02 AM (f8jKx)

176 The Middle East will not have peace until there isn't a drop of oil left.

The US is trying to achieve peace in the Middle East by sucking it dry so it will be as barren as the deserts of the region.

Only then will they allow US reserves to be tapped.

Posted by: Islamic Rage Boy at February 27, 2011 05:54 AM (tvs2p)

177

Somewhere, Al Gore is rolling over in his grave.

Oh, wait ... he's not dead yet.

Well, he'll have a heart attack when he hears about it!

Posted by: Optimizer at February 27, 2011 06:05 AM (2lTU+)

178

The problem is they have an over active case of self importance, as if the planet actually gives a shit about them. Then there is their sheer arrogance to even think they can control the planet. _________________________________________________________________

I hate how they alweays claim to speak for the planet, as if they alone know what the planet would say.  What if it said, drill me,baby !  I'm hot and bothered and want my second chakra released. Oh wait...that was AlGore.

Posted by: fedupwithit at February 27, 2011 10:32 AM (FF5on)

179 It's such a shame that we have such a wealth of various energy resources right here in our own country. There is no need for the USA to be dependent on other countries that already have such hold on our economy. It is pure stupidity that this administration is purposefully cutting us off from our own supplies, from which supplies we could generate a wealth of energy AND good paying private sector jobs. As for me, I am still praying that the judge handling the gulf permit moratorium madness will lay another smackdown on the energy department.

Posted by: Terry in GA at February 27, 2011 06:11 PM (aYYSH)

180 Stupid eco-wackos always telling us the earth is fragile ITS A LOAD OF BULL KAKA

Posted by: Spurwing Plover at February 28, 2011 05:41 AM (vA9ld)

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