December 31, 2009

Superatoms: Not quite alchemy, but something pretty close
— Purple Avenger

There is nothing new under the sun. Just huge pile of old shit we haven't discovered yet.

...Three Penn State researchers have shown that certain combinations of elemental atoms have electronic signatures that mimic the electronic signatures of other elements...

...Superatoms are clusters of atoms that exhibit some property of elemental atoms. Former work in Castleman's lab has involved investigating the notion of superatoms. One of his previous experiments showed that a cluster of 13 aluminum atoms behaves like a single iodine atom. Adding a single electron to this aluminum-atom system results in the cluster behaving like a rare-gas atom...

They go on to say that it might be able to replace Platinum with much cheaper Tungsten Carbide as a catalyst. This is pretty interesting. I'm virtually certain now that I've made these things in the lab and never realized it. It would explain a lot of unexpected results we've gotten.

Posted by: Purple Avenger at 08:53 AM | Comments (117)
Post contains 165 words, total size 1 kb.

1 by unexpected results, do you mean explosions?

Posted by: Dreagon at December 31, 2009 08:56 AM (vuxje)

2

i won't be happy until they can turn dirty socks into quadcore processor chips.

Happy New Year!

(be safe out there tonight morons)

Posted by: shoey at December 31, 2009 08:58 AM (zrQss)

3 These three likely woke up in a pile of certain combinations of something on the floor of the Shandygaff.

Posted by: Penn State Marine at December 31, 2009 08:59 AM (8KFCG)

4 Sounds unstable.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 09:00 AM (Cctty)

5 WTH. By extrapolation, could we add a nut to Zero and make him behave like a man?

Posted by: maddogg at December 31, 2009 09:02 AM (OlN4e)

6 I trust nothing that comes out of Penn State until tomorrow's game is over.

Posted by: LSU Fan at December 31, 2009 09:02 AM (ZgE80)

7 So maybe Midas wasn't just a myth?

Posted by: kathysaysso at December 31, 2009 09:04 AM (dz6wg)

8 Tungsten carbide drills! What the bloody hell's tungsten carbide drills?

Posted by: Dad at December 31, 2009 09:04 AM (YRjsF)

9

 Honestly, officer.  I was just messing around while making Rock-Candy.  Must've got some super atoms mixed in there!

Posted by: Busted Meth Cooker at December 31, 2009 09:07 AM (XMjmy)

10 by unexpected results, do you mean explosions?

Had a few of those, but no. 

One example was when I was punching some elemental aluminum into SiC wafer (in a nitrogen purged chamber to prevent oxidization of the AL).  Normally the resistance laterally across the surface of the wafer is in the mega-ohm range.  After the process, the resistance across the surface was around 60 ohm.    That was unexpected.  Its almost as if I'd created a StarTrek'ish "transparent aluminum", but I didn't think I had enough aluminum there to accomplish that sort of thing uniformly.

It was transparent though, and it was surprisingly conductive...which might be useful.  Maybe that process I stumbled on could replace more expensive ITO coating.

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 09:08 AM (BsmB2)

11 I wonder if I can take my old pennies, melt 'em down and then make coins that have all the properties of gold.  They only have to last for a couple days.

Posted by: Ace's liver at December 31, 2009 09:09 AM (XIXhw)

12 I'd melt the pennies down and press new 1909 S pennies out of them...then age them a bit in a tumbler, oxidize them a tad with some nitric acid, and go get rich ;->

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 09:12 AM (BsmB2)

13 7 So maybe Midas wasn't just a myth?

Posted by: kathysaysso at December 31, 2009 02:04 PM (dz6wg)

Nooooo it is a muffler shop and well spoken for by George Foreman.

Posted by: rightzilla at December 31, 2009 09:12 AM (rVJH4)

14 This is really incredible. Depending on how extensive and stable such atoms are, the potential applications of this are astonishing.

Posted by: Jason at December 31, 2009 09:13 AM (Nljcu)

15 "Posted by: Ace's liver at December 31, 2009 02:09 PM (XIXhw)" Is counterfeiting immoral if you do it really well? I've wondered about that.

Posted by: Bugler at December 31, 2009 09:14 AM (YCVBL)

16 Is this anything like Yahoo Serious splitting beer atoms?

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 31, 2009 09:14 AM (l1Wlr)

17 That is interesting, especially the replacement of expensive catalysts with cheaper materials. But they don't really get into how exactly the superatoms mimic the atoms they mimic, and whether they really act as a catalyst, but mostly imply it. It would also be interesting to know how stable these mimic atoms are under various conditions that the catalyst materials operate under. Catalyst metals are generally quite stable and nonreactive. If the mimics could emulate them under normal operating conditions for a service life long enough to make them economically advantageous, they would be worth millions.

Posted by: maddogg at December 31, 2009 09:15 AM (OlN4e)

18 Any dilithium show up yet?

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 09:15 AM (Cctty)

19 I'd be happy to trade my unicorn for a matter converter.

Posted by: Rodent Liberation Front at December 31, 2009 09:15 AM (dQdrY)

20 Purple A: Very interesting. Did you get spectroscopy on that surface?

Pt catalysts are everywhere, and even in the minute quantities used in detectors and such, a cheaper material would be great. I wonder if this could tweak the reactivity, too. A really good oxygen reduction catalyst would be an enabler of a lot of technology.

Posted by: Dave Eaton at December 31, 2009 09:15 AM (Zolrd)

21 I'm virtually certain now that I've made these things in the lab.

Purple Avenger - your moron card has just been revoked.  It was clearly fraudulent.

Posted by: IreneFingIrene at December 31, 2009 09:16 AM (lhxhu)

22 Wow. That was all, like, blahblahblah to me.  But it sounds cool.

Posted by: BA in Communication at December 31, 2009 09:16 AM (b0THY)

23 The practical development of the fuel cell could revolutionize the production of energy and transportation. These mimics could make it happen.

Posted by: maddogg at December 31, 2009 09:17 AM (OlN4e)

24 "22 Wow. That was all, like, blahblahblah to me. But it sounds cool." Yeah, that's why I tried to steer the discussion toward something tangible, like morality.

Posted by: Bugler at December 31, 2009 09:18 AM (YCVBL)

25

Wow!  Timely!

Obama administration attempts to use superatoms to prove that they are only relatively incompetent:

http://tinyurl.com/yg8l6ca

Doesn't work.

via HotAir

*I used some flexibility superatoms in tying this in.  Appropriate - no?*

Posted by: Hussein the Plumber at December 31, 2009 09:19 AM (r1h5M)

26 Way to fuck dem atoms nikka!

Posted by: Obama at December 31, 2009 09:20 AM (GfYt/)

27
Wait, you have a lab?


Like Batman?

Posted by: Z Ryan at December 31, 2009 09:21 AM (cMo6P)

28 It was transparent though, and it was surprisingly conductive...which might be useful.  Maybe that process I stumbled on could replace more expensive ITO coating.

With no spectral signature?

Posted by: Jean at December 31, 2009 09:22 AM (xCBQ4)

29 and when you put forty Republican Senator atoms together they turn into a Democrat atom.  This is known as Rinotaurium.

Posted by: Gordon Freeman at December 31, 2009 09:22 AM (T1boi)

30

Careful now.

Penn State is where Micheal "Hocky Stick" Mann is ensconced.

Posted by: TakeFive at December 31, 2009 09:25 AM (/3pxq)

31 Yeah a little science crap is all I needed now that I have started to drink already? hava heart ?

Posted by: nevergiveup at December 31, 2009 09:26 AM (ekqTc)

32 I suspect they are not thermodynamically favored and are very sensitive to oxygen, temperature, pressure, and suggestions their valence shell is fat. The periodic table works for me.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 09:29 AM (Cctty)

33

Awesome!  Where do I go to invest in this new technology?

Anyone wanna buy some stock?

Posted by: Dude Who Owns 500K Shares of Cold Fusion Stock at December 31, 2009 09:32 AM (Zj8fM)

34

I'd like to tweak the reactivity a bit to do selective hydrogenations that Pt is not doing (or not doing well).  Maybe a more stable / longer living aldehyde reduction catalyst? 

Looks like I've got some reading to do.

Posted by: Morris at December 31, 2009 09:33 AM (mIKPy)

35 Very interesting. Did you get spectroscopy on that surface?

Our local materials characterization capability is very limited, since our budget is $0.00 currently ;->  The effect was noted and added to one of the patents though.

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 09:34 AM (BsmB2)

36

Anthropogenic Alchemy!

Posted by: Cicero at December 31, 2009 09:34 AM (QKKT0)

37 I'm virtually certain now that I've made these things in the lab and never realized it.

I'm virtually certain I've done this shit in the Oval Office just by thinking about it.

Posted by: Obama at December 31, 2009 09:35 AM (GfYt/)

38 We must close the superatom gap.
(insert vast amount of silence here)
Fore!

Posted by: B+racky Ob+mao at December 31, 2009 09:39 AM (yGQ/+)

39 (insert vast amount of silence here)

(insert vast amount of SPENDING here)

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 09:40 AM (BsmB2)

40 I'm virtually certain one of my skid marks looked like Maya Angelou.

Posted by: Bugler at December 31, 2009 09:41 AM (YCVBL)

41 Maybe there's a way to say process say...pudding in such a way that it would mimic a brain for Joe Biden?

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 09:42 AM (BsmB2)

42 I  did alchemy, but I really prefer tailoring and enchanting. My armor rocks.

Posted by: pajama momma in san diego at December 31, 2009 09:42 AM (275r1)

43

"I need Tungsten to live... TUUUUUNNNNGSTEN!"

Sorry, can't help it.

Posted by: TallDave at December 31, 2009 09:46 AM (/s1LA)

44 There's a world shortage of lithium coming.  Wonder what atom combines to replace it.

Posted by: Strick at December 31, 2009 09:47 AM (93CPh)

45 It would explain a lot of unexpected results we've gotten.

Like the jobless claims?

Posted by: The Mega Independent at December 31, 2009 09:47 AM (b0NHc)

46 I  did alchemy, but I really prefer tailoring and enchanting. My armor rocks.

Dumbass clothies. Frost DK tanks rule ...

Posted by: Kristopher at December 31, 2009 09:48 AM (Jjzb5)

47 How would you keep bulk amounts of these things from collapsing into an unwanted form? Sounds cool, but at the Gee Whiz stage right now.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 09:51 AM (Cctty)

48 This might be old, but it's new to me.  Floating, 3-D laser tech.

Posted by: D߮W at December 31, 2009 09:51 AM (eneDn)

49 Video of AIST's 3-D laser.  Very cool.  I can envision movies with princesses floating in air saying things like "Help us Obi-Wan Kenobe.  You're our only hope."

Posted by: D߮W at December 31, 2009 09:54 AM (eneDn)

50 Imagine bacon created from the atoms of lesser meats.

Posted by: Cicero at December 31, 2009 09:55 AM (qY45y)

51 How would you keep bulk amounts of these things from collapsing into an unwanted form?

You'd probably have to create them in little isolated nano-islands...which our current lasertech is perfectly suited to doing.  It wouldn't be hard at all to deposit little inert walls around the islands.  We already know how to do that pretty rapidly.

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 09:59 AM (BsmB2)

52 "4 Sounds unstable." Nah. PA always writes like that. And by the way, we've been meaning to talk to you about those "unexpected results" since the last one crawled out of the lab and started starring in Japanese tentacle porn...

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at December 31, 2009 09:59 AM (+dRzX)

53

I could have used some of that faux-platinum, tungsten carbide for the wedding ring I bought last year.

Posted by: D߮W at December 31, 2009 10:00 AM (eneDn)

54

certain combinations of elemental atoms have electronic signatures that mimic the electronic signatures of other elements...

Yeah...but can they do a really good Christopher Walken impression?

 

Posted by: rum, sodomy and the lash at December 31, 2009 10:00 AM (AnTyA)

55 "32 I suspect they are not thermodynamically favored and are very sensitive to oxygen, temperature, pressure, and suggestions their valence shell is fat. The periodic table works for me." Consarn it, phlogiston and the luminiferous ether were good enough for granpa and dadgum, they're good enough for me!

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at December 31, 2009 10:02 AM (+dRzX)

56

52 "4 Sounds unstable."

Nah. PA always writes like that.

B+

Posted by: rum, sodomy and the lash at December 31, 2009 10:02 AM (AnTyA)

57 Should I sell my platinum now?

Also, maybe this is one step closer to hydrogen powered vehicles becoming commonplace.  Expensive fuel cell catalysts are one thing that makes them terribly expensive.

Posted by: David at December 31, 2009 10:03 AM (T8c0z)

58

Nice link, PA.  Interesting stuff.  I wonder if they'll be able to create designer materials like superconducting, room-temperature rubber, diamond hard ice-crystals, or something that looks and acts like gold that is half the weight.

Posted by: D߮W at December 31, 2009 10:05 AM (eneDn)

59 Who would have guessed it?  Unobtanium is obtainable.

Posted by: D߮W at December 31, 2009 10:06 AM (eneDn)

60 51, If we could shield them with carbon nanotubes we'd have a catalytic space elevator cable. Or swords that glow blue when Orcs are near. Nothing attracts chicks better than that.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 10:07 AM (Cctty)

61 sockie

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 10:08 AM (eneDn)

62 The science is settled!!!!!!111!!!1

I said so.

Posted by: Michael Mann at December 31, 2009 10:08 AM (GDOa/)

63 "How would you keep bulk amounts of these things from collapsing into an unwanted form? Sounds cool, but at the Gee Whiz stage right now." Well, what they mean by "superatom" is that the molecules have the same electronic and chemical properties as atoms. Their physical properties are still those of aluminum, tungsten, etc. Great for chemical reagents and catalysts, but no replacement for precious metals.

Posted by: Mike Z. at December 31, 2009 10:08 AM (JjPWh)

64 How about glass vessels that transform cheap scotch into a 12- year single malt?

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 10:09 AM (Cctty)

65 I always thought "cluster of atoms" meant "molecule" or, in the case of metals, "alloy". Never suspected that these clusters could mimic the properties of a SINGLE atom...

Posted by: Zimriel at December 31, 2009 10:10 AM (N8KrH)

66

I have no idea what Purple is speaking about , so i turned it into something i could understand.

It was transparent though, (negligee) and it was surprisingly conductive... conducive to that which might be useful.  Maybe that process I stumbled on could replace more expensive ITO (er well fill in this blank)coating

Posted by: willow at December 31, 2009 10:10 AM (7FgWm)

67 eman 32 I suspect they are not thermodynamically favored and are very sensitive to oxygen, temperature, pressure, and suggestions their valence shell is fat.

In short - Unobtanium

Posted by: Zimriel at December 31, 2009 10:13 AM (N8KrH)

68

How about glass vessels that transform cheap scotch into a 12- year single malt?

Now you're talkin'.  And I think that passes the MikeZ chemical-electronic test.  In fact, you could have dentures that taste like scotch but act like dentures.  Right, MikeZ?

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 10:13 AM (eneDn)

69 MikeZ, electronic properties are physical properties when it gets down to it, eh?

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 10:15 AM (eneDn)

70 How about diamond-hard aerogel?

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 10:16 AM (eneDn)

71 May this help alleviate the damage to the school's reputation that was done by hiring Michael Mann. Go State!

Posted by: t-bird at December 31, 2009 10:16 AM (GFhBu)

72 "Castleman said that he doesn't know if the pattern will occur across the entire periodic table or if it will be confined to only a part of it. Right now, he and his team are working through the transition-metal atoms."

If the results cannot be extended through simple inorganic compounds (like compounds involving the alkali metals), they still might be extended through organometallics (and silicon and germanium counterparts).  This should give us chemists many more low-cost things to play with.  I wonder if they can come up with a dirt cheap hydrogenation catalyst to replace platinum.

Posted by: Mike Z. at December 31, 2009 10:21 AM (JjPWh)

73

Here's another thingy.  A flexi.  I didn't know they already had theses.  Nobody tells me nuttin.

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 10:21 AM (eneDn)

74 And yeah, if you got a cluster of aluminium atoms to act chemically like a fluorine atom, you can expect everything around it to corrode and/or burn and/or explode; while turning your lungs into highly acidic paste

Posted by: Zimriel at December 31, 2009 10:21 AM (N8KrH)

75 Cool. It explains my earlier experiments too.I combined 1 communist atom and one dog shit atom and wound up with a new president.

Posted by: Jimma at December 31, 2009 10:22 AM (8yIhu)

76

purr purr purr purr

Awesome post, PA!

Happy New Year, M&M's!

mac :]

Posted by: macbrooks at December 31, 2009 10:23 AM (J+MD4)

77 Maybe they'll make a strainer that converts tapwater into beer.

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 10:26 AM (eneDn)

78 "MikeZ, electronic properties are physical properties when it gets down to it, eh?"

What I mean is that these compounds probably won't have the same stability across the temperature range or the same physical appearance at any temperature as the metals they mimic.  Tungsten carbide most definitely does not resemble platinum and titanium oxide doesn't resemble nickel.  There won't be any tungsten carbide and cubic zirconia rings you can fob off on your girlfriend, I'm sorry to say.

I wonder if anyone has attempted to use WC as a hydrogenation catalyst....

Posted by: Mike Z. at December 31, 2009 10:27 AM (JjPWh)

79 What the hell?  I was told there would be no math here!

Posted by: Chefess (formerly RushBabe) at December 31, 2009 10:28 AM (LKkE8)

80 I wonder if anyone has attempted to use WC as a hydrogenation catalyst.... Posted by: Mike Z A new use for Home Depot products.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 10:33 AM (Cctty)

81 Well, the authors of this article overstate their case a bit.  (By the way the article is available for free.)

First what the authors looked at was the photoelectron spectrum corresponding to electron detachment from the negative ion.  The spectra are similar (but not identical) for the diatomic anion and the corresponding metal anion.  This just says that the molecular orbitals in the valence region are similar.  This isn't an earth-shattering discovery.

Second, the two substances will have different material properties.  Nickel is a metal.  Titanium oxide is not.

Third, the two substances have different symmetries.  Atoms have spherical symmetry, diatomic molecules do not.  Symmetry is really important in quantum mechanics.  So their wavefunctions will never become exactly identical, which is what would have to happen if one substance were to behave identically compared to another.

It is an interesting discovery but it does not herald the dawn of modern alchemy.

Posted by: chemjeff at December 31, 2009 10:34 AM (Gk/wA)

82 While we're on the subject, can anyone tell me the minimum recommended austenitizing temperature of commercial grade 0-1 tool steel?

Posted by: maddogg at December 31, 2009 10:36 AM (OlN4e)

83 Go 'way. Me not want hear this. Is bad, is very bad.

Posted by: laptop-battery at December 31, 2009 10:36 AM (/VEEI)

84 Third, the two substances have different symmetries.  Atoms have spherical symmetry, diatomic molecules do not.  Symmetry is really important in quantum mechanics.  So their wavefunctions will never become exactly identical, which is what would have to happen if one substance were to behave identically compared to another.

Yep.  Not to mention these molecules are, in many instances, going to be a lot larger than the corresponding metals with all that entails.

Posted by: Mike Z. at December 31, 2009 10:41 AM (JjPWh)

85 Yep.  Not to mention these molecules are, in many instances, going to be a lot larger than the corresponding metals with all that entails.

In fact, from an electronic perspective, they will always be larger.  The size of the nucleus of an atom varies, but the total electronic space (but not the wavefunction / orbital shape) around an atom is nearly the same regardless of the atom in question.

Posted by: Mike Z. at December 31, 2009 10:45 AM (JjPWh)

86 Flubber?

Posted by: Hongqi at December 31, 2009 10:46 AM (56lYi)

87 Pffft, I combined a Smurf with a Thunder Cat and made cinematic history.

Beat that, science!

Posted by: James Cameron at December 31, 2009 10:48 AM (MA4nM)

88 Maybe I can help? My Alchemy is at 450 and I can do all the transmutations.

Posted by: Bosk at December 31, 2009 10:48 AM (pUO5u)

89 I read this on PhysOrg last nite.

re: 65

previously, it was called a bose-einstein condensate.  but those only occur at very low temps where a cluster of atoms will function like a single one.

I may be misreading the article, but from what i gather, these "superatoms" are molecules that just happen to behave identically (thus far, only with electron removal) to an element.  they havent tested chemistry et al.  I suspect it wont work when it comes to chemistry, or at least it doesnt wrap around the periodic table, b/c then PbO would be just like radium.

Posted by: A.G. at December 31, 2009 10:52 AM (jBPzC)

90 ahem.  or what chemjeff said

Posted by: A.G. at December 31, 2009 10:53 AM (jBPzC)

91

I always thought "cluster of atoms" meant "molecule" or, in the case of metals, "alloy". Never suspected that these clusters could mimic the properties of a SINGLE atom...

Posted by: Zimriel at December 31, 2009 03:10 PM (N8KrH)

There's nothing new about that -- they're called radicals (or used to be, know they're called "functional groups"). Nitrate and nitrite, for example. NO3 acts much like a single atom in chemical reactions.

I think the special deal here is that these groups of atoms mimic the electronic signatures of other elements. What's just as interesting is that the mimicry by these super atoms is predictable.

Not being a chemical guy I can't predict the implications of these critters but PA has an interesting thought about using them as catalysts. You could shave a ton of money off the price of a car by replacing the platinum in catalytic converters with something cheaper. You might even be able to fine tune them to improve their performance.

Since their effects are based on specific configurations of elemental atoms you won't be able to react them with other stuff to make new wonder substances, I suppose. But, then, who knows. Maybe PA will be the first person to build super atoms from chemical compounds. Sounds like right now you could mix them with other goop to make something with physical properties presently unobtainable. I predict their first uses will be in nano-tech, however, either herding those pesky little atoms into do things they refused to do before or doing what is done now cheaper and on a larger scale.

Posted by: Tinian at December 31, 2009 11:01 AM (7+pP9)

92 If it craves sugar and leaves a green spectral trail --you've got a bug.

Posted by: AE at December 31, 2009 11:04 AM (kSfPT)

93 This just says that the molecular orbitals in the valence region are similar.

For the work I've been doing, this is the most interesting part.  It means we might be able to dope with something cheaper than certain expensive hard to handle pyrophoric metalorganic gasses and still get nearby covalent/trivalent bonds in the resulting lattice to behave the way we want them to. 

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 11:04 AM (BsmB2)

94

Third, the two substances have different symmetries.  Atoms have spherical symmetry, diatomic molecules do not.  Symmetry is really important in quantum mechanics.  So their wavefunctions will never become exactly identical, which is what would have to happen if one substance were to behave identically compared to another.

It is an interesting discovery but it does not herald the dawn of modern alchemy.

Posted by: chemjeff at December 31, 2009 03:34 PM (Gk/wA)

So does that mean these super atoms are useless for nano tech (can't be used as substitutes), or does it mean there's another tool in the drawer -- even if we're not sure how to use it?

Posted by: Tinian at December 31, 2009 11:08 AM (7+pP9)

95

>>Maybe there's a way to say process say...pudding in such a way that it would mimic a brain for Joe Biden?

I thought the idea was to convert worthless shit into expensive stuff, not the other way round.

Posted by: Tushar at December 31, 2009 11:10 AM (KXhmI)

96 Any chance this could explain the false cold fusion  "discovery"?

Posted by: ParisParamus at December 31, 2009 11:10 AM (Hv1Cx)

97 Thank you, Tinian.

Posted by: Zimriel at December 31, 2009 11:11 AM (N8KrH)

98

Interestingly, it is in this way that CO2 clusters mimic water vapor.  It's all in my DVD box set, for only $19.95

Posted by: Albert Gore Jr., Nobel Laureate at December 31, 2009 11:17 AM (GwPRU)

99 So does that mean these super atoms are useless for nano tech

There's a lot you can do at the atomic level without needing QM effects.  The biggest problem is probably going to be sorting the wheat from chafe after they're created and getting a pile of wheat large enough to be useful.  Atomic level sifting is hard.

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 11:18 AM (BsmB2)

100 When they can make a few hundred kilos of the stuff we can test its usefulness. They sound like exotic structures that exist only under exotic conditions. Suppose I should read the paper first, though.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 11:18 AM (Cctty)

101

>>It means we might be able to dope with something cheaper than certain expensive hard to handle pyrophoric metalorganic gasses and still get nearby covalent/trivalent bonds in the resulting lattice to behave the way we want them to. 

Um... I will be in my bunk.

Posted by: Tushar at December 31, 2009 11:22 AM (KXhmI)

102 I think I've made "rare gas" atoms many times.  Depends on the right mixture of hard-boiled eggs, beans and cabbage.

Posted by: Phoenix at December 31, 2009 11:22 AM (tVKbW)

103 Yep, as I suspected, these thingies exist only inside a mass spectrometer.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 11:27 AM (Cctty)

104 I only want to know who is going to split one...with their mind.

Posted by: Bill H at December 31, 2009 11:29 AM (q8CmE)

105 Nahh anything in principle can be used for nanotech, it just means that they can't necessarily substitute one for another.

Posted by: chemjeff at December 31, 2009 11:29 AM (tJ4Ym)

106

One quantum effect is transparency.  I wonder if they'll be able to make shit transparent that is normally opaque.

Also superconductivity shit.  Let those electrons roll, baby.

And reduction of friction shit. 

All kinda shit.

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 11:45 AM (NaNYi)

107

>>And reduction of friction shit. 

That could be a godsend

Posted by: Constipated guy at December 31, 2009 11:59 AM (KXhmI)

108
So it's kinda like when a hobo chugs a bottle of Valu-Rite® with a Sterno® chaser and starts actin' like a Super-hobo with Super-hobo strength,  only he's really suave and shit?  Like a totally different hobo all together.  'Cause if that's what we're talkin' about,  I totally get it.

Posted by: Dang at December 31, 2009 11:59 AM (UA4gE)

109

What was that nutty voodoo belief where people thought a small amount of a material mixed in water made the whole container of water adopt the same characteristics?

Homeopathy?

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 12:11 PM (NaNYi)

110 I paid my homeopathic doctor with a vial of water diluted 500x from some water that was steeped in a few shreds of his bill.

He got kinda pissy.

Posted by: George guy at December 31, 2009 12:17 PM (xMlot)

111 They sound like exotic structures that exist only under exotic conditions.

Even that can be useful.  With our lasertech we've created and sort of "flash frozen" such exotic materials into states they wouldn't otherwise be happy staying in.  There's quite a bit of stuff you can make with nano-scale processing that simply can't exist in the general universe where heating/cooling effects are of necessity macro-scale.  Extremely fast heating/cooling allows for some interesting stuff to happen.

Posted by: Purple Avenger at December 31, 2009 12:20 PM (BsmB2)

112 111, Extremely fast heating and cooling generally yields kinetically favored products. Keeping them around and making them in bulk can be tricky.

Posted by: eman at December 31, 2009 12:29 PM (Cctty)

113 Ya know, this "atom" stuff could have some potential.  If those scientists keep up the research, they may be able to create a new, clean, unlimited energy source.

Posted by: RTH615 at December 31, 2009 12:35 PM (Rytlc)

114

I paid my homeopathic doctor with a vial of water diluted 500x from some water that was steeped in a few shreds of his bill.

Ha!

Posted by: Guy Fleegman (rdb) at December 31, 2009 12:52 PM (NaNYi)

115

Mike Z:  Yes, hydrogenation would be great... no more Pt pooping out on you 'cause it's seen too much aldehyde... no more pinch-o-lewis acid to keep it fresh...

 

Posted by: Morris at December 31, 2009 12:53 PM (mIKPy)

116 With DVD to iPad 3G Converter, users can easily convert DVD movies/IFO folder and rip DVD Disc to iPad/iPad 3G for entertainment. If you are looking for an easy-to-use DVD to iPad 3G software, here Aiseesoft DVD to iPad Converter is your best choice.

This DVD to iPad 3G Converter is actually a total DVD Ripper, which allows users to rip DVD movies to any popular video formats, including AVI, MPEG, WMV, DivX, RM, MOV, 3GP, 3GP2, MP4, H.264, H.264/MPEG-4 AVC, AVI, DivX, XviD, WMV, HD H.264, HD DivX, HD WMV, HD XviD, etc. And you can play the converted DVD movies on iPad, iPod, iPhone, Apple TV, Zune, PSP, Creative Zen, etc.

Posted by: dvd to ipad 3g at June 09, 2010 12:35 AM (9MaiN)

117 sex shop, produto erotico, lingerie sensual

Posted by: sex shop at March 12, 2011 07:09 PM (BObQV)

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