December 30, 2012

Sunday Morning Book Thread 12-30-2012: End of the Year Edition [OregonMuse]
— Open Blogger


drinkers.jpg
New Year's Day At AoSHQ

Good morning morons and moronettes and welcome to this week's bleary, hungover, and out-of-focus. Sunday Morning Book Thread.

You Know Who Else Has Written a Book?

Moron commenter Oldsailors Poet, that's who. His new book Amy Lynn, just came out last week. According to the Amazon description:

Amy Lynn is the story of the life of a sheltered, unrefined, tomboyish country girl relatively untouched by the culture of the outside world. While growing up in the early 1990's on the outskirts of the small rural town of black Oak Alabama, she learns that honor, virtue and a strong work ethic are not just positive character traits, but a way of survival

This is a story about character, both good and bad, and how it is formed and how it is nurtured. From the intensely personal author's note:

Throughout the years I have met people, wonderful people, that stood by me when I was at my worst, when my life was at it's lowest. I often wondered, who mentored them? Who made them who they are? Why would they waste time with me? But they did, and I am a better man for it.

With this in mind, it appears to me as if this book is Oldsailors Poet's way of paying back a debt that he never really can repay. So, if someone does you a kindness, the only thing you can do do is to pass on that kindness to someone else. And that looks to be precisely what OSP has done by writing his book.

New Moron Author Writes Book, Wants Reviews

Occasional moron commenter 'Secret Squirrel's Balls Und Sheft' has just published a book for children ages 5-9, Sir Robert of Cheshire (The Great Jueyjua Hunt). The author tells me it is written "in the vein of the great adventure stories of Kipling, Hemingway etc."

The book is actually more than just a story. At the end of the book there are activities for the kids to do, a scientific lesson, and food recipe that kids can do with their parents.

I'm thinking this book would appeal to homeschooling parents, who tend to like to use the same basic material for multiple subjects and lessons.

Also, any book is worth reading if it's prefaced by an author's note such as this:

A warning to parents and kids!   If you don’t like hunters or hunting: DON’T READ THIS BOOK.  

If you are unsure as to where hamburgers, hotdogs, chicken drummies or T-bone steaks come from, DON’T READ THIS BOOK!   THIS BOOK ISN’T FOR YOU!

If you don’t like adventure, exploring different cultures, learning about delicious and exotic foods, or learning new skills, YOU REALLY SHOULDN’T READ THIS BOOK.

If your heroes are professional athletes and movie stars, YOU SHOULD PUT THIS BOOK DOWN IMMEDIATELY!

If, however, you admire courage, honesty, honor, adventure, and seeing a good and brave man fight monsters and strange beasts, THEN YOU WILL REALLY LIKE SIR ROBERT AND I SUGGEST YOU BEGIN READING THIS TO YOUR CHILDREN NOW.

The only complaint about this book is that it is only available in a Kindle edition, which is an inadequate format for this type of book. This book really needs to be published in a dead tree edition, a "hands-on" book to be grasped, passed around read again and again, notes scribbled in, stuff spilled on it at the dinner table, taken to be read in bed, etc.

On the other hand, it only costs $2 on Kindle.

The author also says:

I've written about 10 of these stories and will publish more if I can get some reviews and feedback.

I bought this book to review and believe me, it's worth checking out for your kids.


Yet Another Moron Author

Rumor has it that Sabrina Chase has either just released, or is about to release yet another one of her fine books. Hopefully, she will e-mail me the details so I can feature them in an upcoming book thread.


Public Service Announcement

Valu-Rite logo.jpg


Attention North Carolina morons who want to celebrate the New Year on the cheap: You can now purchase Valu-Rite Vodka for $7.40. You're welcome.

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, rumors, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at aoshqbookthread@gmail.com.

So what have you all been reading this week?

Posted by: Open Blogger at 06:22 AM | Comments (140)
Post contains 754 words, total size 5 kb.

1 Got Shelby Foote's complete Civil War, so I can stop continually checking it out from our local library.  Like a fool, the first time I checked out all three volumes.  It took three renewals last summer to get through the first one.  Up to the battle of Fredricksburg right now.

Posted by: Ruby at December 30, 2012 06:26 AM (vt4Ip)

2

Finally finished Phantom by Ted Bell - It just didn't grab me and pull me to the end like his other Hawke novels.  Still a good read but the series is falling off for me. 

Starting Steve Berry's The Jefferson Key.  It was recomended here a while ago and its been on the read shelf for months.

Posted by: sunny at December 30, 2012 06:32 AM (R4ZNT)

3 LOL, those look like San Miguel cans so that must be AOSHQ in Manilla.  But on to books.



I gave up on re-reading the Wheel of Time series in preparation for next month’s final book.  I made it to book 5 and all the noted problems with the series seemed to be magnified in the re-read.  I now am not sure whether I will get the final book or not.  I guess I will wait and see what the price of the Kindle version is.


Anyway I moved on to one I purchased through the Daily Deal;  a semi-biography of George Washington’s political rise by John Ferling.  I had read one of his previous histories describing the run up to the Declaration of Independence and thought it was pretty good.  I should have known it had problems when he tried to place Washington and Jefferson in today’s political hoppers; calling Washington right wing and Jefferson left wing.  If anything they were the opposite.  But both are currently spinning in the graves.  I still say if we can get a device to reduce the frequency due to the high rate of spin and place a PMG on their bones our energy problems would be solved.


Of course VA residents may object to high voltage lines running out of Mount Vernon and Monticello.


I have now moved on to one I have been meaning to give a try to for a long time; A Wizard of Earth Sea by Ursula K. Le Guin.  But what’s up with the Kindle pricing there?  $7.01 for an E-book originally published in 1968?  I still say I am in agreement with the DOJ in prosecuting the collusion by publishers in price fixing of e-books.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 06:34 AM (53z96)

4 First, I'm astonished that there is a real Valu-Rite vodka.  I just assumed that was a nectar of the gods unavailable to us mortals.  Time to stock up!

Second, I'm reading my first book on my new Kindle Fire 2 (Federalist papers).  I still prefer dead tree, but it's growing on me, and my house will be a lot neater.

Posted by: pep at December 30, 2012 06:37 AM (6TB1Z)

5 I am happy to say that the value rite listing was my doings.  I use to be on the ABC board and bought several cases for ace, but no one knows where the hell to send them to him so I still have them in my "emergency" room. 

If Willard had won you can bet I'd have drank a bottle or two.

The bottles came with no labels, and it's not bad vodka.

You have to special order it. 

Posted by: Billy Bob, pseudo intellectual at December 30, 2012 06:38 AM (wR+pz)

6 Ah CBD, I did not mean for you to kill your thread.  It will keep the book thread clean and about books.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 06:38 AM (53z96)

7 So a commenter with the nic Secret Squirrel Balls is writing kids' books? That's a Moron right there.

Posted by: BCochran1981 at December 30, 2012 06:39 AM (IvVLN)

8 If it's not too tacky to mention, I just published something on Kindle as well. It's a media satire called Dirty Laundy, and it is available on Amazon. http://tinyurl.com/b2nv8j5

Posted by: Paul Zummo at December 30, 2012 06:40 AM (6JU6C)

9 7 So a commenter with the nic Secret Squirrel Balls is writing kids' books?


That's a Moron right there.

Posted by: BCochran1981 at December 30, 2012 11:39 AM (IvVLN)


Does "Big Sis" know about this?

Posted by: Billy Bob, pseudo intellectual at December 30, 2012 06:40 AM (wR+pz)

10 I'm still plowing my way through "Middlemarch" and "The Natural Navigator:  The Rediscovered Art of Letting Nature be Your Guide".  The first is a classic and fully deserving of that status; the latter is good in parts but weirdly hard to follow (a book about directions; go figure) in others.


Again kudos to OSP for having a coherent concept of a work of fiction and the stamina and mental drive to put it on print.

Posted by: Captain Hate (dagny 2013 return tour?) at December 30, 2012 06:42 AM (txCfk)

11 That "kid's" book intro makes the book look really good. I don't have any kids but maybe I can get the book anyway.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 06:42 AM (53z96)

12 Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 11:38 AM (53z96)

I checked the queue before I posted it, but OregonMuse is fast!

I am a guest here, so.....

And....they say that an armed society is a polite society, and if you could see the barbs behind the scenes, you would realize how important it is to stay on the coblogger's good side!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 06:43 AM (GsoHv)

13

For all you Renaissance morons, Brunelleschi's Dome by Ross King tells the story of the construction of the dome of Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Italy along with an amazing set of characters of the time--Donatello, Michelangelo, etc. along wth Brunelleschi's mortal enemy Lorenzo Ghiberti.

An incredible tale, well told.

Posted by: Libra at December 30, 2012 06:44 AM (kd8U8)

14
In November 2012 Locus Online hosted a poll for the best novels and short fiction of the 20th and 21st centuries.  Here's the lists for the 20th Century.

http://tinyurl.com/cufynnr

20th Century SF Novel:

Rank    Author : Title (Year)    Points    Votes

1 Herbert, Frank : Dune (1965)
2 Card, Orson Scott : Ender's Game (1985)
3 Asimov, Isaac : The Foundation Trilogy (1953)
4 Simmons, Dan : Hyperion (1989)
5 Le Guin, Ursula K. : The Left Hand of Darkness (1969)
6 Adams, Douglas : The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (1979)
7 Orwell, George : Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)
8 Gibson, William : Neuromancer (1984)
9 Bester, Alfred : The Stars My Destination (1957)
10 Bradbury, Ray : Fahrenheit 451 (1953)


20th Century Fantasy Novel:
Rank    Author : Title (Year)

1 Tolkien, J. R. R. : The Lord of the Rings (1955)
2 Martin, George R. R. : A Game of Thrones (1996)
3 Tolkien, J. R. R. : The Hobbit (1937)
4 Le Guin, Ursula K. : A Wizard of Earthsea (196
5 Zelazny, Roger : Nine Princes in Amber (1970)
6 Lewis, C. S. : The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950)
7 Mieville, China : Perdido Street Station (2000)
8 Gaiman/Pratchett : Good Omens (1990)
9 Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (1997)
10 Crowley, John : Little, Big (1981)


Ender's Game in the second slot is ridiculous.  "The Last Starfighter" did a better job with that plot.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 06:45 AM (kdS6q)

15 Just finished a bit of fluff: The Panther, by Nelson DeMille.

Not bad for easy reading. The main character is a smart-ass, and his incessant smart-assery gets old every once and a while, but it's still a good read, but definitely not at full price.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 06:46 AM (GsoHv)

16 Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 11:45 AM (kdS6q)


Nothing by Heinlein????  And I am sorry, Game of Thrones absolutely sucked.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 06:47 AM (53z96)

17 Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 11:45 AM (kdS6q)

A bit of trivia about Ursula K. LeGuin.

The "K" stands for Kroeber. Her father was Arthur Kroeber, a famous anthropologist (Ishi, for you geeks), who has a building named after him at U.C. Berkeley.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 06:50 AM (GsoHv)

18 I am well and truly shamed by all the Horde who have published books.  New Years resolution is finish and publish!

Not read anything new, just re-read 'Dark of the Moon' by P.C. Hodgell while flying.  Still interesting and good.  In comparison to 'Godstalk' which takes about place in about 18 months, it's sequel takes place in only about 30 days.  And the rest of the books follow that more rapid pace.  And Jame and Tori keep getting into the most interesting problems along the way.

So in the Honorverse a few questions.  Will Henke put a pulser to Oversteegan's face and make him use proper pronunciation?   Or Aivars will bring Siobahn out to Spindle?  Mesa and the Sollies thought they had problems; wait until Sonja Hemphill, Ginger Lewis, and Shannon Foraker start having mutual brainstorms.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 06:52 AM (t9Q9e)

19

I was off for 6 days around Christmas so I went on a little mystery binge:

 

"Shame" by Alan Russell.  Someone recommended the author but for a different book.  They didn't have the recommended book at the library so I tried this one.  It was OK.

 

"Force of Habit" about an ex-nun turned private eye.  I found the main character to be almost realistic, good thing since the author is an ex-nun, and the story wasn't too bad.  It was OK.

 

"The Prostitutes' Ball" by Stephen J. Cannell (the TV producer, "A-Team" etc.).  This was pretty much police procedural but I liked the characters and didn't regret reading the book.  More than just OK, but not all the way to good.

 

"Into the Darkest Corner" by Elizabeth Haynes.  Absolutely the best suspense novel I've read in a long, long time.  The author built up the suspense gradually and built the characters by showing, not telling.  I gave this five stars at the library website and I'm almost inclined to read it again.  I don't normally buy mysteries because they are too ephemeral:  once you know, you know, but this one would probably be worth it.  This was outstanding.

Posted by: Tonestaple at December 30, 2012 06:52 AM (BGruy)

20 Nineteen Eighty Four isn't really sci-fi imo; and including anything by LeGuin while omitting Arthur C Clarke is teh sucque.

Posted by: Captain Hate (dagny 2013 return tour?) at December 30, 2012 06:52 AM (txCfk)

21
@16

11 Heinlein, Robert A. : Stranger in a Strange Land (1961)
12 Heinlein, Robert A. : The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress (1966)
21 Heinlein, Robert A. : Starship Troopers (1959)

Stranger is a weak book, but I guess the kids read it in a college SF class.


Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 06:54 AM (kdS6q)

22 Morning mouthbreathers. I finally finished up Trapped the new Iron Druid book by Kevin Hearne. Quite fun and much better than the last book. I really like where he's going with it particularly how it's ultimately about consequences and about the implications of both avtion and inaction. For a fun urban fantasy series there's some deeper things going on.

Posted by: alexthechick at December 30, 2012 06:55 AM (RBHxa)

23 Stranger is a weak book, but I guess the kids read it in a college SF class.


Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 11:54 AM (kdS6q)



I *really* hated every fucking page in it and according to my fellow morons, it kept me away from his other better work.

Posted by: Captain Hate (dagny 2013 return tour?) at December 30, 2012 06:56 AM (txCfk)

24 Some in that Locus poll can be explained because of other media exposure - Harry Potter and Game of Thrones.  So not really worth a sunstone.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 06:56 AM (t9Q9e)

25 I didn't much care for SIASL either other than when I originally read it I was a horny teenager and it gave me a boner in some scenes.


I have re-read it since then and assigned it to the bleh stack.  But he has a lot of books that stack up better than most of those in the top ten.  And I agree that 1984 is NOT SF.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 06:59 AM (53z96)

26
I have now moved on to one I have been meaning to give a try to for a long time; A Wizard of Earth Sea by Ursula K. Le Guin. But what’s up with the Kindle pricing there? $7.01 for an E-book originally published in 1968? I still say I am in agreement with the DOJ in prosecuting the collusion by publishers in price fixing of e-books.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 11:34 AM (53z96)


Oh, I love the Earthsea series, still have the old, worn set my Dad gave me long ago.

Posted by: KG at December 30, 2012 07:00 AM (IPz9m)

27
Here's the Locus lists for the 21st.  Like everything else in this century, they pretty much blow:

21st Century SF Novel:
Rank    Author : Title (Year)

1 Scalzi, John : Old Man's War (2005)
2 Stephenson, Neal : Anathem (200
3 Bacigalupi, Paolo : The Windup Girl (2009)
4 Wilson, Robert Charles : Spin (2005)
5 Watts, Peter : Blindsight (2006)
6 Morgan, Richard : Altered Carbon (2002)
7 Collins, Suzanne : The Hunger Games (200
8 Gibson, William : Pattern Recognition (2003)
9 Mieville, China : The City & the City (2009)
10 Stross, Charles : Accelerando (2005)


21st Century Fantasy Novel:
Rank    Author : Title (Year)

1 Gaiman, Neil : American Gods (2001)
2 Clarke, Susanna : Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell (2004)
3 Rothfuss, Patrick : The Name of the Wind (2007)4
4 Mieville, China : The Scar (2002)
5 Martin, George R. R. : A Feast for Crows (2005)
6 Rowling, J. K. : Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007)
7 Bujold, Lois McMaster : The Curse of Chalion (2001)
8 Mieville, China : The City & the City (2009)
9 Fforde, Jasper : The Eyre Affair (2001)
10* Bujold, Lois McMaster : Paladin of Souls (2003)
10* Pratchett, Terry : Night Watch (2002)


I'd probably give Old Man's War the top slot too. And Hunger Games?  No, don't think so....


Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 07:01 AM (kdS6q)

28 Harry Potter and Game of Thrones. So not really worth a sunstone.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 11:56 AM (t9Q9e)


I have read the Harry Potter series and I thought the first few books were good. But towards the end it turned really dark which didn't bother me so much, but the series was supposed to be for kids.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:01 AM (53z96)

29 I'm still plowing my way through "Middlemarch" and "The Natural Navigator: The Rediscovered Art of Letting Nature be Your Guide". I still have "plowing my way through Kate Upton" on my to-do list.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at December 30, 2012 07:01 AM (NjJzM)

30 Game of Thrones absolutely sucked.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 11:47 AM (53z96)

Is that the politics of the author or the quality of the story? Or both?

And...have you seen the HBO series?

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 07:03 AM (GsoHv)

31 There isn't but one book on that 21st list that I have read.  Only two or three of the authors are ones that I have read.


The best pure space opera writer now is David Weber and I see he did not make the cut.



The best fantasy writer now is probably Mercedes Lackey and I see neither her nor Andre Norton made the cut in either list. (Don't remember when Andre Norton died)

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:04 AM (53z96)

32
I have read the Harry Potter series and I thought the first few books were good. But towards the end it turned really dark which didn't bother me so much, but the series was supposed to be for kids.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 12:01 PM (53z96)


Yea, but kids do grow up, it can't just be sunshine and rainbows forever.

Posted by: KG at December 30, 2012 07:06 AM (IPz9m)

33 Is that the politics of the author or the quality of the story? Or both?

And...have you seen the HBO series?

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 12:03 PM (GsoHv)



Don't know what his politics are. I could never make it past the third chapter in the first book.  My wife bought the first three books in hardcover for me.  I never even opened the second two.  Wound up giving all three books to the library. 

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:06 AM (53z96)

34 Have any of my fellow horde members read Kate Wilhelm's "Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang"?  I read it when I was in a sci-fi intensive phase and it stood out from the rest on being a surprisingly thought provoking and insightful story based on confronting some issues on human cloning.

Posted by: Captain Hate (dagny 2013 return tour?) at December 30, 2012 07:07 AM (txCfk)

35 OregonMuse, I'm kinda in tears right now. I wasn't sure if anyone would truly see through the purpose of my book. Thank you so much.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:08 AM (l86i3)

36 2¢ from H

List #5 Zelazny, Roger : Nine Princes in Amber (1970)

I tried one of the Amber books and although I finished it, I kept wondering why I was still reading it and when it would end.

8 Gaiman/Pratchett : Good Omens (1990)

I am working my way through the Pratchett series and although I also wonder why I am reading the book when I am reading it, I am always sorry to see each one end.  The man has a great imagination and a way with language that is quixotic and hilarious.

Agree that Heinlein should be on every list of science fiction top picks.

Posted by: Hrothgar - LIB or SMOD (for the Children) at December 30, 2012 07:09 AM (Cnqmv)

37 Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 12:04 PM (53z96)

John Scalzi?

If you haven't read him it's worth a look. "Old Man's War" is particularly good, and the beginning of a nice little series.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 07:09 AM (GsoHv)

38 I got a book at B&N the other day called The Hypnotist by Lars Kepler. I like psychological thrillers or mysteries. Has anyone read it?

Posted by: Sassy at December 30, 2012 07:09 AM (VthfI)

39 I don't read books. Honestly. Unless they're assigned for credit. The last three books I borrowed from the library were how-to manuals and I skimmed them. But this struck me as funny: http://thomasfriedmanopedgenerator.com/Backlash+to+the+Backlash+9d886e

Posted by: Your Moron pal, Truman North at December 30, 2012 07:09 AM (I2LwF)

40 Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 12:06 PM (53z96)

Hard-core socialist...and an asshole.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 07:10 AM (GsoHv)

41 Your very own Thomas Friedman In A Box.

Posted by: Your Moron pal, Truman North at December 30, 2012 07:10 AM (I2LwF)

42 'Stranger' was one of his few mishaps, along with probably 'Friday' although the cover art, is right up the Moron's ally, IYNWIM, Mistress, is probably one of his best,  Stross is good when he goes for the absurd, as the Laundry series,
but the last was just too weighed down with his hatred for us 'bitter clinger'

Posted by: phillip fry at December 30, 2012 07:11 AM (Jsiw/)

43 Your very own Thomas Friedman In A Box.

Posted by: Your Moron pal, Truman North at December 30, 2012 12:10 PM (I2LwF)



I'd torch the box and have Dr 12 Gauge poised to address anything scurrying from it.

Posted by: Captain Hate (dagny 2013 return tour?) at December 30, 2012 07:11 AM (txCfk)

44 The opening for P.C. Hodgell's 'Godstalk' which is now part of 'The God Stalker Chronicles' which combines it and 'Dark of the Moon' into one book.  Bet it hooks you.

http://tinyurl.com/ayqrj88

Baen currently publishes her works.  Her father was Robert Hodgell.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:12 AM (t9Q9e)

45 Stross is good when he goes for the absurd, as the Laundry series,
but the last was just too weighed down with his hatred for us 'bitter clinger'

Posted by: phillip fry at December 30, 2012 12:11 PM (Jsiw/)



Stross executes some brilliant concepts but politically he's a brainless fuckhead.

Posted by: Captain Hate (dagny 2013 return tour?) at December 30, 2012 07:13 AM (txCfk)

46 Per last week's recommendations, I read "The Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follet.

A good yarn.  But when did authors starting slipping in a little porn (see what I did there?) into novels?  I think I will have to go back to reading "the classics".

Posted by: Al at December 30, 2012 07:13 AM (V70Uh)

47 >>

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 12:08 PM (l86i3) <<

 

dammit, man...when is the Kindle version coming out. i don't want to hear...blah, blah, blah...maybe in a few weeks or so.

 

I want somethimg firm!!!

(pretty please)

Posted by: Albie Damned at December 30, 2012 07:13 AM (Yhu4q)

48 Hard-core socialist...and an asshole.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 12:10 PM (GsoHv)


All the more reason to stay away from his shit.  No wonder his books sucked. I just wish I wasn't out ~ $60 for those three POS.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:13 AM (53z96)

49 #28

The books came out over a ten year span. Those who started with the first book before the rest came out was in college by the time the series ended.

It's a bit different for a kid starting the series now with everything available but there are far worse things. I'd be more concerned about the mother in GameStop yesterday who didn't seem concerned when her boys, who looked to be perhaps eight and ten, selected the Grand Theft Auto V pre-order as one of their choices.

Posted by: epobirs at December 30, 2012 07:15 AM (kcfmt)

50 If you haven't read him it's worth a look. "Old Man's War" is particularly good, and the beginning of a nice little series.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 12:09 PM (GsoHv)


I saved a link for that in my "wish list" for the Kindle.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:16 AM (53z96)

51 Vic probably already covered the daily deal, but there's 14 Ian Fleming James Bonds books today at $1.99 each on Kindle.

Posted by: NCKate at December 30, 2012 07:18 AM (XwChs)

52 Just finished last man standing, It wan't bad but Mitch Rapp seems too be growing into a caricature of himself. In the past I have become so enraptured with Flynnn's books that I had to start them on a friday or Saturday night and read to completion, this was not one of those books, good but not great.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:18 AM (l86i3)

53 I will probably never read any of John Scalzi's works. Its something personal okay.  Scalzi decided to re-write as a lark H. Beam Piper's book 'Little Fuzzy.'  The worse part is, his agent talked him into publishing it.  He turned a nice little story about humans and possibly intelligent aliens into a legal thriller.  He also managed to prune away half the cast in a book he made almost twice as long as the original.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:18 AM (t9Q9e)

54

Old Man's War by Scalzi is a very good read.  He sold the book 10 years ago today in fact:

 

http://tinyurl.com/be8k4se

Good series as well...

Posted by: sunny at December 30, 2012 07:19 AM (R4ZNT)

55 I want someth___ firm!!! (pretty please) Posted by: Albie Damned at December 30, 2012 12:13 PM (Yhu4q) Dealing with publishers and editors is far from an exact science. We are looking at two to Four weeks. Pisses me off too but the wheels turn slow.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:20 AM (l86i3)

56 And Scalzi had an interesting thing with 'RedShirts' where you can sort of get where it's going, but the reason is a little interesting, Stross among his other fields, are IT, and I concur with his view of it, as some form of magic.

Posted by: phillip fry at December 30, 2012 07:20 AM (Jsiw/)

57 So Mitch Rapp is going bad eh?  I am still on the waiting list for that at the library.  I'll cut him some slack though.  He had prostrate cancer which made it to his bones. They called it stage III but IIANM that is really stage IV.


Probably hard to write when you are either drugged up or in pain or both.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:23 AM (53z96)

58 Nuke the box from orbit as they say...?

Posted by: Your Moron pal, Truman North at December 30, 2012 07:23 AM (I2LwF)

59 I feel like two strong men are squeezing my skull with forceps right now so I think ill come back around later. Anybody know how to clear out cement-clogged sinuses? Because they did that to me too.

Posted by: Your Moron pal, Truman North at December 30, 2012 07:25 AM (I2LwF)

60 Probably hard to write when you are either drugged up or in pain or both. Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 12:23 PM (53z96) Agreed. I'm still abig fan but the fall off was obvious.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:26 AM (l86i3)

61 Re: Science Fiction Top 10 Not having any Heinlein or Poul Anderson is an abomination.

Posted by: Fox2! at December 30, 2012 07:27 AM (1Qpmy)

62 If you want some space opera there is always Glen Cook - Shadowline, Starfishers, Star's End, and Passage At Arms.  Plus The Dragon Never Sleeps.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:27 AM (t9Q9e)

63 wait until Sonja Hemphill, Ginger Lewis, and Shannon Foraker start having mutual brainstorms. That assumes that Ginger (and SCPO Wanderman) survived Oyster Bay.

Posted by: Fox2! at December 30, 2012 07:29 AM (1Qpmy)

64 41, Truman North, that was actually painful.  I read one and a half of them and my eyes started to bleed.

Posted by: Tonestaple at December 30, 2012 07:30 AM (BGruy)

65  I hang around with a bunch of writers when I'm not hobo-ing. That's the stench of respectability y'all  be smelling.

Posted by: e Carey Lowe at December 30, 2012 07:32 AM (tdaam)

66 Fox2! Because of the evacuation drill guess who was away from the station when Oyster Bay struck - the research teams.  So yeah going out on a limb but I think Ginger survived.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:33 AM (t9Q9e)

67
Re: Science Fiction Top 10

Not having any Heinlein or Poul Anderson is an abomination.

Posted by: Fox2!




Anderson only shows up far down in the 20th Century Novella list:

40 Anderson, Poul : The Queen of Air and Darkness (1971)

Pretty big omission, given the number of books he wrote.  His novel "Tau Zero" was quite influential for the "Big Physics" style of books.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 07:33 AM (kdS6q)

68 Amy Lynn, is it about a rural Lesbian who is raped then seeks brutal revenge on her Redneck inbred attackers? I would read that.

Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 07:33 AM (G6kli)

69 Amy Lynn, is it about a rural Lesbian who is raped then seeks brutal revenge on her Redneck inbred attackers? I would read that. Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 12:33 PM (G6kli) No , it's not, not even close.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:34 AM (l86i3)

70 Are Anne McCaffrey's Dragons science fiction or fantasy? In either case, she belongs on the list. As does Andre Norton. And just to be obnoxious, John Norman for Gor.

Posted by: Fox2! at December 30, 2012 07:34 AM (1Qpmy)

71 OSP, you just heard from the puerile juvenile.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:35 AM (t9Q9e)

72 Sometimes I like to go back to earlier book threads. In case others do as well, here is Index 2012, part 1:

2012Jan 01     no theme
2012Jan02     Kindle recommendations
2012Jan08     no theme
2012Jan15     Moron authors
2012Jan16     Kindle review
2012Jan22     Liberty and Tyranny/Levin
2012Jan29     Why Men Rule/Goldberg
2012Feb05     Coming Apart/Murray and The People's Money/Rasmussen
2012Feb12     Magazines (periodicals)
2012Feb19     no theme
2012Feb26     The Devil Is Real/Louvin and Thinking, Fast and Slow
2012Mar04     Show Me the Money
2012Mar11     no thread
2012Mar18     no thread
2012Mar25     The Forgotten Man/Shlaes
2012Apr01     Rules For Radicals
2012Apr08     Easter
2012Apr15     April Anniversary
2012Apr22     Gone To the Dogs
2012Apr29     The Bear Necessities

Thanks for all the recommendations

Posted by: ThroughtheRavenglass at December 30, 2012 07:36 AM (Z0YZC)

73 @ 62 Love Cook's Garrett PI series, though I haven't tried his other series yet.

Posted by: Ed Wood VS Godzilla at December 30, 2012 07:36 AM (obHYs)

74 Just finished John Ringo's first book, 'Live Free, or Die.' -Really excellent reading.

It's billed as sci-fi space stuff- and it is, but if you read it, you'll see that it is more than that. It follows the life of one man who builds his business empire during the darkest days of earth's history. Conservatives and libertarians will love it. Mod dems too, if they aren't too brainwashed.

It's part of the series and I have no qualms about buying the rest right away. Good stuff.

Posted by: Book at December 30, 2012 07:37 AM (WpcKa)

75 56 And Scalzi had an interesting thing with 'RedShirts' where you can sort of get where it's going, but the reason is a little interesting, Stross among his other fields, are IT, and I concur with his view of it, as some form of magic. Posted by: phillip fry at December 30, 2012 12:20 PM (Jsiw/) If you have the capacity to grasp Stross then you should also try Ian McDonald, Jasper Fforde, and China Meiville. Gaiman peaked with American Gods then went all kiddy author. Pratchett is suffering from Alzheimers and his newer work isn't as substantial as his earlier. Peter Clines three novels are fun and so is Richard Kadry. Just don't limit it to Sandman Slim.

Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 07:37 AM (G6kli)

76 @ 59 Thermite?

Posted by: Ed Wood VS Godzilla at December 30, 2012 07:37 AM (obHYs)

77 Anna, True. But Ginger was on the commander's staff. Which was going through the research section doing a security inspection. At best, ambiguous. And was Weber willing to break Helen Zwilinski's heart by killing off Paolo?

Posted by: Fox2! at December 30, 2012 07:37 AM (1Qpmy)

78 Anne McCaffrey's dragon books are dressed up romance novels.  Go read 'Mark of Merlin' and 'The Lady' by her.  Then compare to 'Restoree' or 'Dragonquest.'

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:37 AM (t9Q9e)

79 71 OSP, you just heard from the puerile juvenile. Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 12:35 PM (t9Q9e) Yeah, I'm kind of frightened by the level of rage I feel right now, like someone just slapped one of my children. I want to kill, in the worst way. I'm gonna have to learn to deal with that cause I'm sure there will be much more to come.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:37 AM (l86i3)

80 69 Amy Lynn, is it about a rural Lesbian who is raped then seeks brutal revenge on her Redneck inbred attackers? I would read that. Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 12:33 PM (G6kli) No , it's not, not even close. Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 12:34 PM (l86i3) Saving it for the sequel then?

Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 07:38 AM (G6kli)

81 I didn't think about Anne McCaffrey.  I think she has passed on now too.  Dragon Riders of Pern is now a classic.  I think it would go in as fantasy in the first three books, then switch to SF in the last few in that series.  (not counting all the multiple prequels)

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:38 AM (53z96)

82 Working my way through the writings of James Madison right now.  Good stuff.

Posted by: Aaron at December 30, 2012 07:38 AM (Tlix5)

83 I'm about 2/3 of the way through Wilkie Collins' "The Moonstone". It's been more engrossing then I expected and I'd certainly be willing to read another of his books, especially since this was a free Kindle download.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette, still a Hobbit at December 30, 2012 07:39 AM (HWW8s)

84 Vic, Anne McCaffrey has passed away.  Her son Todd is now writing Pern books.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:40 AM (t9Q9e)

85
Are Anne McCaffrey's Dragons science fiction or fantasy? In either case, she belongs on the list.

Posted by: Fox2




On the 20th fantasy novel list

41    McCaffrey, Anne : Dragonflight (196

although those stories are actually SF.  The original dragon novellas rank about the same on their list.

I guess when the author passes, the fanbase dies away pretty quickly.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 07:41 AM (kdS6q)

86 Yeah, a lot of my favorite authors are going to the big publisher in the sky now.  Its a byproduct of getting old.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:41 AM (53z96)

87 Saving it for the sequel then? Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 12:38 PM (G6kli) Your dumb ass is walking through the dark, unaware it's actually the throat of a large beast.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:42 AM (l86i3)

88 OSP there are a few avenues for this type of matter.  Ignore.  Mock.  Or throw things.  Choose wisely.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:42 AM (t9Q9e)

89 Here's the linkage to Ringo's 'Live Free or Die' on kindle:
amzn.to/X7fkff

Seriously, check it out if you haven't already.

Posted by: Book at December 30, 2012 07:42 AM (WpcKa)

90 I have finally decided to read "Les Miserables." I have almost two weeks off for the holidays and didn't know what else to do with myself except spend money that I can't afford to spend or eat my way into another dress size. What can I say, I loved the movie and the stage show, and wanted to read the whole story. I have to say that so far this is one of the best novels I have ever read. I stayed up until 1:30 a.m. reading it just to get through one scene that was so well written and compelling that I could not put it down. The movie and stage show sort of do it justice, but I highly recommend the book to anyone who is intrigued enough by the characters of Jean Valjean, Fantine, Javert, etc. to want to know more about them. I got it on my Nook for $2.99, though I know there are free e-books floating around. This, to me, is what e-readers were made for, the classics that you can get cheap and then you don't have to schlep around a huge book or wqorry about losing your place in it.

Posted by: rockmom at December 30, 2012 07:43 AM (qe2/V)

91 50 If you haven't read him it's worth a look. "Old Man's War" is particularly good, and the beginning of a nice little series. Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 12:09 PM (GsoHv) I saved a link for that in my "wish list" for the Kindle. Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 12:16 PM (53z96) Scalzi is kind of overrated. Once you read people like Ian McDonald, China Meiville or Jasper Fforde you realize just how insubstantial most other authors are. Even reading one of Butchers better Dresden books illustrates just how far others need to go. Same with Pratchett. Or better yet read early Scifi/Fantasy. Hard to top Lord of the Rings, Lovecraft, Burroughs, Heinlein, Asimov, Clarke or any of those early wordsmiths who wrote with all their heart and intellect.

Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 07:43 AM (G6kli)

92 OSP there are a few avenues for this type of matter. Ignore. Mock. Or throw things. Choose wisely. Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 12:42 PM (t9Q9e) Yeah, i'll check out for awile, later rons.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 07:43 AM (l86i3)

93

Looking at the lists of best SF and Fantasy, I did notice that there are no books published by Baen.  Possibly because they are based in the Carolinas and not part of the NY book  scene.  LM Bujold made one list for her books (Chalion) published by a NY publisher.  (Personally I thought Mirror Dance and Memory were better.) 

 

Or because the publisher had a strong libertarian vibe.  Even though they have authors from all the political spectrum including socialists. 

Posted by: rd at December 30, 2012 07:44 AM (zLp5I)

94 22 Morning mouthbreathers. I finally finished up Trapped the new Iron Druid book by Kevin Hearne. Quite fun and much better than the last book. I really like where he's going with it particularly how it's ultimately about consequences and about the implications of both avtion and inaction. For a fun urban fantasy series there's some deeper things going on.

I finished that one recently, and I agree with all of this. You make a very good point about the intelligence of the underlying moral of the ongoing story, and how it adds richness to the series. Reminds me of the Dresden series in that way -- that an important part of the protagonist's arc is the struggle to do the right thing in challenging circumstances.

The anti-mining theme that seemed to be developing earlier in the series seems to have receded to a dull background hum, and the front-and-center conflicts in Trapped were clever, intense, and great fun to read. I especially enjoyed the developing relationship with his apprentice.

Posted by: Splunge at December 30, 2012 07:44 AM (2IW5Q)

95 BTW, you can get the first three of those Dragon Rider books for the kindle now in a single volume pretty cheap.


http://is.gd/YoppfN




Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:44 AM (53z96)

96 First part of McCaffrey's 'Dragonflight' won a Hugo as the short story 'Weyr Search.'  So there is that.  I think it got pigeonholed as science-fiction because she placed the stories on the planet in the Rubkat system.  Strip it down, you have a knight, albeit on a dragon, in search of a lost queen.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:44 AM (t9Q9e)

97 87 Saving it for the sequel then? Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 12:38 PM (G6kli) Your dumb ass is walking through the dark, unaware it's actually the throat of a large beast. Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 12:42 PM (l86i3) Cool opening for the sequel. Is that a dream sequence or setting up for her to rip her way out of a mutant constrictor. I can see a whole series like True Blood but more sciency.

Posted by: Mike Hunt at December 30, 2012 07:45 AM (G6kli)

98 I read Libriomancer by Jim Hines which was a fun fantasy of people who could magically pull items out of books, for instance phaser pistols from a Star Trek novel. It was similar to a Dresden novel with the White Council fighting to preserve order against those who would use their powers for ill. It was more lighthearted than Dresden novels though, especially nowadays. Pretty good, will have to look into other works by the author. I'll also be interested in Amy Lynn once it comes out in e-book.

Posted by: waelse1 at December 30, 2012 07:46 AM (OrZRC)

99 Posted by: rd at December 30, 2012 12:44 PM (zLp5I)


Baen does a lot of stuff that pisses off the big publishers. No DRM, cheap books, and even FREE books.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 07:47 AM (53z96)

100 Oh, I know that we all know that he is an SCOMF but he is still our president... Embarrassing! "I am skeptical..." No, you are not! Not for one minute have you ever hoisted Diogenes' lamp. That's such a horseshit response that anyone of my college tutors would have smacked you around like a Freshman for tying to be so vacant and pretentious at the same time.

Posted by: Deety at December 30, 2012 07:47 AM (aOVhq)

101 I have just cracked open the massive third volume of (nominally) William Manchester's three-book Churchill biography. In the intro, author Paul Reid tells the story of how William Manchester had completed his research, his notes, and 100 pages of the book, when he was hit by a stroke that took his ability to write.

It is an impossible undertaking to take over for another author of that level of talent, but the reviews were good, and I'd been left hanging by the second book, which ended just as France was invaded and Churchill ascended, so I had to check it out.

I asked for it for Christmas when I got one of those "what do you want for Christmas" questions, so it's the physical book, rather than Kindle bits. It's huge and heavy and inconvenient to deal with.

Posted by: Splunge at December 30, 2012 07:49 AM (2IW5Q)

102

" So, if someone does you a kindness, the only thing you can do do is to pass on that kindness to someone else. And that looks to be precisely what OSP has done by writing his book."

 

 

 

 

Congrats OSP!

BTW, a cat named Jesus had quite a bit to say on that subject.

Posted by: maddogg at December 30, 2012 07:52 AM (7jOFk)

103 Just for the heck of it, here is the first paragraph from Glen Cook's 'Passage At Arms' novel.

"The personnel carrier lurches through the ruins under a wounded sky. The night hangs overhead like a sadist's boot, stretching out the moment of terror before it falls. It's an indifferent brute full of violent color and spasms of light. It's an eternal moment on a long, frightening, infinite trail that loops back upon itself. I swear we've been around the track a couple times before."

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 07:53 AM (t9Q9e)

104 Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 12:47 PM (53z96)

I love it when the market sticks it to the bad guys.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at December 30, 2012 07:55 AM (GsoHv)

105 Oh, and sort of OT, but if you are spending a day or evening at home reading with the TV and computer off, and want some great music to listen to, I bought Rockdad for Christmas a 4-CD Ella Fitzgerald set that is just wonderful. It is called "Ella Fitzgerald: Seven Classic Albums," issued by Real Gone Jazz.

Posted by: rockmom at December 30, 2012 07:57 AM (qe2/V)

106 61 Re: Science Fiction Top 10 Not having any Heinlein or Poul Anderson is an abomination. Posted by: Fox2! at December 30, 2012 12:27 PM (1Qpmy) ................ I'm an abomination.

Posted by: Alia Atriedes at December 30, 2012 07:57 AM (0JB89)

107

Anna Puma

 

I am looking forward to the next few Weber books.  I think he has something ugly planned for Beowulf.  Like Techno-dyne missiles programmed to hit the planet instead of the Beowulf fleet when Earth's battle fleet comes calling. 

 

I think Paolo is OK.  I read the E-arc of the next book, and Helen does not mention his death. 

 

I am wondering how they get Scotty Tremaine and Shannon Foraker together?  He is out in the Spindle quadrant.   

 

Posted by: rd at December 30, 2012 07:59 AM (zLp5I)

108 I think Scotty will be staying in the Talbot Quadrant, Countess Gold Peak has a score to settle after all.  As I said Sonja, Ginger, and Shannon together should make a real witches brew of whup-a** for Mesa and the Sollies.

Though I wonder if anyone has through of getting the Beowulf technicians to do a quick and dirty refit of all those Sollie super dreadnaughts.  Be a quick way to add rear combat strength and in the Talbot something more in line with their tech base while acting as a stepping stone to real Manticoran technology.

Whether Beowulf gets smacked depends upon how fast Countess Gold Peak puts a pulser to a whole planet and pulls the trigger.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 08:06 AM (t9Q9e)

109 OSP, I keep forgetting to mention:  I already ordered your book and should get it on Wednesday.  I'm looking forward to it.

Posted by: Tonestaple at December 30, 2012 08:07 AM (BGruy)

110 Book...re:live free or die Keep going with the series, its great...a shame it stopped at book #3. Check out the looking glass series also by ringo for a similar read

Posted by: sunny at December 30, 2012 08:08 AM (R4ZNT)

111 OSP, I keep forgetting to mention: I already ordered your book and should get it on Wednesday. I'm looking forward to it. Posted by: Tonestaple at December 30, 2012 01:07 PM (BGruy) Thank you.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 08:08 AM (l86i3)

112 OSP, allow me to congratulate you on your book AND your first non-related-person review! You never forget your first one ;-)  I had to restrain myself from printing mine out and framing it. It's hard, but do try to ignore the negative ones. (My favorite was the one accusing me of not knowing any science. This will be news to my thesis committee.)

I don't know what the rancid troll said to you because I have the handy AoS trollhammer script running. You might want to look into that yourself, because trolls are insanely jealous of people who actually accomplish things and he won't stop.

Rumors of a new book from me are true. Twue! A teaser section is available at my site (link in name). What with editing and proofing and such I hope to get it out in a few months. I'm also working on a collection of very silly short stories set in the world of the Bureau of Substandards (short story The Correct Way to Fill Out Form PCR-103-u) that will also come out in 2013.

What is new and out *right now* is the audiobook version of Firehearted. I don't know if this started the rumors or if Anachronda has been talking in his sleep. Again.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at December 30, 2012 08:09 AM (wfSF5)

113
Also:

Amazon.com recently released its list of the best-selling books of 2012. It looked at the sales of books and eBooks that were published in 2012.

The top 10 best-selling books overall are:

1. “Fifty Shades Freed: Book Three of the Fifty Shades Trilogy” by E. L. James

2. “Gone Girl: A Novel” by Gillian Flynn

3. “Fifty Shades Trilogy: Fifty Shades of Grey, Fifty Shades Darker, Fifty Shades Freed 3-volume Boxed Set” by E. L. James

4. “Bared to You: A Crossfire Novel” by Sylvia Day

5. “No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin Laden” by Mark Owen

6. “The Marriage Bargain (Marriage to a Billionaire)” by Jennifer Probst

7. “Reflected in You: A Crossfire Novel” by Sylvia Day

8. “The Racketeer” by John Grisham

9. “Defending Jacob: A Novel” by William Landay

10. “The Innocent” by David Baldacci



Nothing I read, that's for sure.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at December 30, 2012 08:15 AM (kdS6q)

114 I am a William Gibson fan. The fact that he starts one of his recent novels at the Gay Dolphin in Myrtle Beach makes me a fan for life

Posted by: tmitsss at December 30, 2012 08:19 AM (WRZ7l)

115 The "best selling" books are always gong to be women's books for the reason Monty used to talk about.  80% of the market is women.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 08:19 AM (53z96)

116 And was Weber willing to break Helen Zwilinski's heart by killing off Paolo?

Posted by: Fox2! at December 30, 2012 12:37 PM (1Qpmy)

 

He killed off Honor's first love, and I'm still pissed he killed off Allistair McKean. Still love the books greatly.

 

Re: Ringo.

 

Yeah, fun books. He has a bunch out now including a fun non-scifi series about an ex-seal in Georgia (the country, not the state) that is enjoyable. The first book is the weakest, which is weird.

Posted by: Invictus at December 30, 2012 08:20 AM (OQpzc)

117 I am a William Gibson fan. The fact that he starts one of his recent novels at the Gay Dolphin in Myrtle Beach makes me a fan for life

Posted by: tmitsss at December 30, 2012 01:19 PM (WRZ7l)


I have been going to Myrtle Beach for over 30 years and have never been in that store.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 08:22 AM (53z96)

118 Read 7 Wool books.

Posted by: Mama AJ at December 30, 2012 08:23 AM (SUKHu)

119 Yeah, fun books. He has a bunch out now including a fun non-scifi series about an ex-seal in Georgia (the country, not the state) that is enjoyable. The first book is the weakest, which is weird. Posted by: Invictus at December 30, 2012 01:20 PM (OQpzc



LOL< That series is about as close as porn as you can get and still be lose to the mainstream.   Women who get off on the 50 Shades stuff should like it.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 08:24 AM (53z96)

120 Ringo's first Ghost book does a better job of covering S+M than Fifty Shades.  Along with killing Assad and bin Laden.

John Ringo's own admission on why some series seem to just hang there is simple.  He has so many ideas and starts writing, so previous stuff kinda falls by the wayside.

Don't forget Weber killed Helen's mother.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 08:24 AM (t9Q9e)

121 What is new and out *right now* is the audiobook version of Firehearted. I don't know if this started the rumors or if Anachronda has been talking in his sleep. Again. Posted by: Sabrina Chase at December 30, 2012 01:09 PM (wfSF5) Thank you for your kind words. And Yeah, My first review was not Family or friends and It made me dance

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet, aka Jack July author of Amy Lynn available on Amazon. at December 30, 2012 08:25 AM (l86i3)

122 I'm pretty sure I haven't been to the Gay Dolphin since I graduated high school, but cyberpunk in MB amused me so.

Posted by: tmitsss at December 30, 2012 08:29 AM (WRZ7l)

123 LOL< That series is about as close as porn as you can get and still be lose to the mainstream. Women who get off on the 50 Shades stuff should like it.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 01:24 PM (53z96)

 

The sex parts are mercifully short. After the first read you can skip past them without losing any story. In fact, I skip the first book altogether on re-reads.

 

I love the idea of finding a lost pocket of vikings and turning them into modern badasses.

 

Aer Keldar!

Posted by: Invictus at December 30, 2012 08:32 AM (OQpzc)

124

Okay, back to a keyboard that fits my fingers...

 

The "Wool" books are not about knitting, but sci fi, by Hugh Howey.

 

Excellent story line. Gets a bit slow with a ton of detail occasionally, but more than makes up for it by surprising me again and again.

Posted by: Mama AJ at December 30, 2012 08:34 AM (SUKHu)

125 Posted by: Invictus at December 30, 2012 01:32 PM (OQpzc)


I love all his stuff, but I haven't got the last one of those Kildar books because it is a co-written book and the price is still high.


My experience lately with co-written books is the "main author" writes his name on the front of the book and the new guy writes the rest of the book.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 08:36 AM (53z96)

126 Don't forget Weber killed Helen's mother.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 01:24 PM (t9Q9e)

 

You have to admit him being willing to sacrifice an occasional major character keeps the suspense up during any combat scenes.

 

I think he's going to have the Sollies start splitting up as the League's commerce dries up. It is a corrupt thing I think will crack with a little pain it isn't used to.

Posted by: Invictus at December 30, 2012 08:37 AM (OQpzc)

127 107 I'm also working on a collection of very silly short stories set in the world of the Bureau of Substandards (short story The Correct Way to Fill Out Form PCR-103-u) that will also come out in 2013. Very good news. I don't know if this started the rumors or if Anachronda has been talking in his sleep. Again. Since I use a CPAP, I like to think that talking in my sleep makes me sound like Darth Vader.

Posted by: Citizen Anachronda at December 30, 2012 08:42 AM (1c58W)

128 First, let me express my sincere gratitude to Oregon Muse for taking the time to review my Book, "Sir Robert of Cheshire…" It was hard enough getting friends to try to read it due to time and format (you can't really email a 30 meg file); so when it is done by a blog that I love, it's all the more amazing. I appreciate any additional feedback on the book from moron commenters or advice as to how to convert it from electrons to actual dead trees. Now, one other note of explanation. I noticed a few comments about my handle. I used to just go by Secret Squirrel. But after seeing the flick "Bruno," the guys in my office started quoting it (and of course, Borat lines) incessantly. So, the Germanized "balls und sheft" is just my immature, male attempt at humor. I thought morons would appreciate it. Again, thank you OregonMuse and Ace of Spades.

Posted by: Secret Squirrel's Balls Und Sheft at December 30, 2012 08:45 AM (0SmH0)

129 123 or advice as to how to convert it from electrons to actual dead trees. -------- Phase 1: Buy a chainsaw Phase 2: ???? Phase 3: Profit!

Posted by: Citizen Anachronda is more of an idea guy at December 30, 2012 08:51 AM (1c58W)

130 My experience lately with co-written books is the "main author" writes his name on the front of the book and the new guy writes the rest of the book.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 01:36 PM (53z96)

 

I've found the same unless the other author is well known. Ringo and Kratman did good books together.

 

If you go to his chat room at baen just never ask when he and Weber are going to do another Prince Rodger books.

Posted by: Invictus at December 30, 2012 08:53 AM (OQpzc)

131 If you go to his chat room at baen just never ask when he and Weber are going to do another Prince Rodger books.


Did they have a falling out?  They did kind of stop that series before it was ready to be stopped.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 08:55 AM (53z96)

132 44 I got hooked on that series when the first couple were republished and mentioned by Instapundit. Waiting eagerly for the next in the series.

Posted by: Tuna at December 30, 2012 09:13 AM (M/TDA)

133 Tuna, the whole series can be bought as e-book or dead tree edition from Baen.

The only book not available from Baen for Hodgell is 'Blood and Ivory' which was put out by Meisha-Merlin.  This book is a collection of short stories, some previously published by Hypatia Press while others are new.  One of the new stories is a sub-plot set in Tai-Tastigon and Penari's maze.

Finally another treat.  On Baen's web-site is another Hodgell short story titled 'The Talisman's Trinket'  It takes place near the end of 'God Stalk.'
http://tinyurl.com/bb49moz

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at December 30, 2012 09:45 AM (t9Q9e)

134 Helen's Mother (and Helen and her father, too) was a throw-away in a "what else is going on in the war" scene. Didn't go anywhere until Helen was kidnapped by the Scrags (for the Peeps) in Chicago. Which was in in an Honorverse story, not the main line. See Weber's author's note introduction to Storm from the Shadows.

Posted by: Fox2! at December 30, 2012 10:23 AM (1Qpmy)

135 Did they have a falling out? They did kind of stop that series before it was ready to be stopped.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 01:55 PM (53z96)

 

Dunno, but as I heard it Ringo wanted to do another, but he legally can't without Weber, and Weber doesn't want to. And after the millionth person asked when was the next Prince Rog book, he made the subject taboo.  

Posted by: Invictus at December 30, 2012 11:39 AM (OQpzc)

136 LOL, he had a falling out with some stupids.

Posted by: Vic at December 30, 2012 11:50 AM (53z96)

137 Re-reading "The Kingkiller Cronicle" series by Patrick Rothfus in anticipation of the publication of the 3rd book of the series. There is no publication date set yet but I'm hoping sometime this year. The first two books "The Name of The Wind" and " The Wise Man's Fear" respectively are at the very top of my fantasy must read list. Book three is going to be called "The Doors of Stone" I've heard.

Posted by: TheOtherJay at December 30, 2012 12:16 PM (5erAP)

138 128 I've read all of the novels but not the short stories. Added those to my "to read" list .

Posted by: Tuna at December 30, 2012 02:43 PM (M/TDA)

139 If you haven't read any Heinlein, I recommend you give "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" a try... "Methusaleh's Children" is pretty good too.

Posted by: Crazy Bald Guy at December 30, 2012 09:12 PM (8ltUk)

140

I just finishd Nomad, by Ayaan Hirsi Ali (very worth the while), have two new books in the air:  Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen (who's The Song of the Dodo will reward the reader's time) and Market Education by Andrew Coulson, and still have not finished (after at least five years) The Keynesian Episode by W. H. Hutt.

The Sci Fi list assigns inordinate weight to recent work. Where's Wells, The Time Machine ? Where's Huxley, Brave New World ? Where's Capek, The War with the Newts ? Where's Zamyatin, We ? Also, people toward the extreme end of the autism spectrum must dominate the population of sci-fi readers or, at least, voters. How else to explain the populatity of very unliterary writers like Frank Herbert (wretched), Asimov (a lucid non-fiction whiter who should have stayed with non-fiction) and Card (sorry, it's just so-so)?  

John Brunner's The Shockwave Rider  deserves a place on the top ten sci-fi list, for prescience (he invented computer worms before there was an internet).  

Posted by: Malcolm Kirkpatrick at December 31, 2012 09:24 AM (dITBI)

Hide Comments | Add Comment

Comments are disabled. Post is locked.
157kb generated in CPU 0.09, elapsed 0.1093 seconds.
62 queries taking 0.0417 seconds, 327 records returned.
Powered by Minx 1.1.6c-pink.