April 30, 2017

Sunday Morning Book Thread 04-30-2017
— Open Blogger



lucas library.jpg

Personal Library of George Lucas, Skywalker Ranch


Good morning to all you 'rons, 'ettes, lurkers, and lurkettes. Welcome once again to the stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, where men are men, all the 'ettes are gorgeous, safe spaces are underneath your house and are used as protection against actual dangers, like natural disasters, or Literally Hitler, and special snowflakes do not last. And unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these pants, which is a good example of "too much for too little."


Pic Note

Pic stolen from Libraries of the Rich and Famous:

Welcome to Skywalker Ranch – a residence of director and producer George Lucas. “A filmmaker’s retreat.” Lucas conducts a large portion of his business on his land. The home also boasts man-made Lake Ewok, a 300-seat theater, and its own fire station. The ranch is not open to the public

Click on the pic to see not just a bigger version, but there's more library to be seen, particularly the second floor, which you can get to by the winding staircase there on the left.

The ceiling looks pretty cool, too.


Fake Hate Crimes

Why do we keep getting snookered on these widely publicized hate crimes that always seem to turn out to be fake?

The victim doesn't contact police to file a report, and if it happened on a subway or other public transportation, that utility's security force is not notified, there are no witnesses, cell-phone video, or surveillance footage, there's just the victim's claim. Which gets broadcast and retweeted all over the place, and the outragey outrage junkies whine into overdrive. Editorials are written. Strong words of condemnation are spoken. Legislation is proposed.

And then later on it's determined that the victim made the whole thing up.

There are few articles that ask the question, what's with these fake hate crimes, anyway? Here's one, and guess what, it's on Fox News.

Laird Wilcox, author of “Crying Wolf: Hate Crime Hoaxes in America" said college campuses have become the perfect incubator for fake hate crimes.

"This isn’t just my opinion. This is widely recognized now. I would say now 80 percent of the events that happen on campus are hoaxes or pranks," he said.

He adds, "It's a place where consciousness of discrimination, sexism and homophobia is at a peak, and when there's nothing happening, and they need something to happen, they can make it happen."

So I tracked down Laird Wilcox's book. To my knowledge, it is the only book about fake hate crimes, and it was published in 1994(!). To be sure, I also located the book Hate-Crime Hoaxing For Fun And Profit by Michael Rolls, but this appears more satirical than informative.

By the way, Rolls is also the author of the short book, The Opinions You Must Hold: Etiquette In A Left-Wing World, which is book #2 in his "Right wing rants" series. It is currently available for free.

Wilcox's book is out of print, but you can download it for free here or here.

And I found 2 sites that maintain data on hate crimes that turn out to be fake, this one, and that one.


It Pays To Increase Your Word Power®

An ANABATHRUM is a raised seat or throne.

Usage:

"Where's Muldoon?"

"Oh, he's on the anabathrum."

"Is that the one in his libary?"

"Yes."

Amazing Cakes

Some bakers can build some amazing cake sculptures. Like this one:



book cakes.jpg

The text on the "bookcase" reads "Librarians don't retire, they just get re-shelved."

Thanks to 'ette Vendette for the cake link that has photos of other amazing cakes that look like books.


Narnia Reboot

This probably belongs in the movie thread, but it's based on a book, so...

The long-developed Chronicles of Narnia franchise revival is finally taking wing. Captain America: The First Avenger director Joe Johnston has signed on to helm The Silver Chair, the new Narnia pic that will kickstart an all-new franchise for Tristar Pictures,the Mark Gordon Company, the C.S. Lewis Company, and Entertainment One.

Being a fan of the Narnia books for over two decades, I've been keeping an eye on this. I was excited when I first heard they were investing big bucks in film adaptations of the books, but I am disappointed in the product overall. The series has been characterized by steadily decreasing quality, in my opinon. The first adaptation (The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe) was OK, the second (Prince Caspian) was really not all that good, and the third (The Voyage of the Dawn Treader) stunk on ice. I was happy the franchise appeared to have collapsed. And now it's back. I feel personally invested in this as The Silver Chair is my favorite Narnia book. One big reason is that it has one of Lewis' finest characters in the Narnia series, Puddleglum the Marshwiggle. If this character is done poorly, or even merely adequately, it will be a failure.

Fun fact: The Silver Chair was adapted for British television back in the 80s and the actor who played Puddleglum, Tom Baker (of Dr. Who fame) was absolutely brilliant and captured the character perfectly. So it may be that I'm going to be disappointed no matter what.


An Interesting "Ye Olde Tyme" Library For Modern Day Survivalists

Moron commenter Hank Curmudgeon tipped to this extensive collection of survivalist "how to live without modern technology" books. But I don't think you need to be a survivalist to have in interest in these books.

The collection is divided into subjects, which include, but is not limited to, Archery, Drainage Engineering, Livestock, Machine Tools, Smithing, First Aid, Obstetrics, and lots more. It's all pdf documents and all FREE. This is the kind of material that should go in that thousand year archive I mentioned a few weeks back.

Hank also sent a link to a collection of "10 bush craft" books. For those of you who want to do some serious camping out. Here are the titles, all free:

Book 1. - Ropes & Cords
Book 2. - Huts & Thatching
Book 3. - Campcraft
Book 4. - Food & Water
Book 5. - Firemaking
Book 6. - Knots & Lashings
Book 7. - Tracks & Lures
Book 8. - Snares & Traps
Book 9. - Travel & Gear
Book 10. - Time & Direction

Available in mobi, epub, and pdf formats.

Idea: We can package this stuff up and sell it to the deranged left as material they will need to survive the "Trumpocalypse."


Moron Recommendation

Moron lurker (mostly) bensdad00 recommended another Bill Mauldin book, Mud and Guts: A Look at the Common Soldier of the American Revolution

Mud & Guts is an unusual little book about the common Revolutionary War soldier. Bill Mauldin admits he is no historian; he is, rather, a political cartoonist who offered up his wares to The Stars and Stripes during World War II and served as a correspondent during several later armed conflicts. This book grew out of a request from the National Park Service for a book about the experience of the common soldier during the American Revolution - in honor of the 200th anniversary of American independence. The book was not finished until 1978, but it certainly does make for an interesting look at the subject matter.

Sort of a "Willie and Joe" in tri-corner hats. E-copies are available for free download at the above link.


Books By Morons

Moron author James Dudley has just come out with his second novel, The Clown Prince of Kowloon, which the author described in a comment last week as "a combination of comedy and Cold War intrigue set in 1950's Hong Kong":

It is 1957, and comedian Tommy Malloy has received the biggest break of his career, the leading role in the epic musical-comedy film "Hong Kong Harry." While filming on location in Hong Kong, he is tasked by the CIA with a simple but important mission; to approach a series of local smugglers with an offer to sell bootleg films in mainland China, and evaluate their performances for the purpose of future CIA use.

Meanwhile, MI6 is having trouble keeping the lid on a communist revolution over in Malaya, and eventually their mission collides with Tommy's. Zany hijinks ensue.

Tommy's earlier adventures was the subject of Dudley's first novel, The Clown Prince of Paris:

Paris, 1954... Up-and-coming comedian Tommy Malloy is preparing for the biggest break of his career; a series of headline shows in one of Paris's hottest clubs... But when a mysterious audience member asks Tommy for an unusual favor, he is unwittingly pulled into a series of shocking events that leaves him trapped in a deadly web of international espionage. Pursued by the KGB's deadliest assassins with only his wits to protect him, Tommy must run for his life, improvise new identities, and put together the pieces of a sinister plot that threatens to shatter a precarious peace. A continent stands on the brink of World War III, and a B-list celebrity from Philadelphia is the only one who can stop it.


___________

Moron author Hans Schantz is running a special on his novel, The Hidden Truth: A Science Fiction Techno-Thriller. I first mentioned this novel last August. It's kind of like Ayn Rand mixed with Dan Brown. Here is a plot teaser from one of the Amazon reviews:

When a high school student stumbles across a discrepancy between an online version of an old physics book and its pulp original, he quite naturally assumes there was an error made in its scanning. Investigating further, he discovers other 'discrepancies' between old physics books and their online copies, discrepancies which are all related to a particular and peculiar theory of electromagnetism. The more he investigates the clearer it becomes to him that there exists a century-plus long conspiracy to erase all evidence of the intriguing, though counterintuitive, theory. Before too long, the cabal notices the student’s nosing about and the young man learns how deadly serious the conspirators are about suppressing that bit of knowledge.


The price will be lowered to $0.99 April 30-May 2 to encourage people to concentrate their sales during the first couple of days. Then the price will be discounted to $2.99 for the rest of the week. At the end of the week, the price will revert to the usual $3.99.

I may have to move this one to the top of my stack.


___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.

___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 03:54 AM | Comments (287)
Post contains 1878 words, total size 14 kb.

1 Tolle lege

Posted by: Skip at April 30, 2017 03:55 AM (Ot7+c)

2 Good morning.

Posted by: HH at April 30, 2017 03:55 AM (DrCtv)

3 Wow, it's pretty roomy in the Book Thread today. Where is everybody?

Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 03:58 AM (26lkV)

4 I read volume five of the "Lost Fleet" series by Jack Campbell, Relentless. Black Jack Geary liberates a POW camp, finally makes it back to Alliance territory and the fleet fights a climatic battle low on fuel and ammunition. The series continues to be entertaining: rating = 4/5. I also read The Glider War by James Mrazek. The book is an operational-level study of the employment of gliders by all the combatants during WWII. The most detail concerns the U.S. development and use. Published in 1975, the author (himself a former glider infantryman) got to interview some of the American, British and German participants. I found it to be a good introduction to the topic; however, if you are looking for information at a tactical-level on glider deployment, this book doesn't have that much detail. The author comes to the conclusion that the U.S. mishandled the glider program and the British did a better job, particularly in giving the glider pilots a defined ground combat role after landing - American glider pilots were not near as useful (due to poor training) and some essentially became tourists during Operation Market-Garden! I give it a rating of 4.5 out of 5.

Posted by: Retired Buckey Cop is now an engineer at April 30, 2017 03:59 AM (5Yee7)

5 Lucas Library. Kinda churchy, no?

Posted by: naturalfake at April 30, 2017 04:00 AM (9q7Dl)

6 Finished book 4 of Thomas Carlyle's History of Frederick II, it covered the hopeful wish of Frederick's mother and others of a double wedding of him and his older sister to British royalty and something I have read often but didn't quite understand Friedrich's father Friedrich Wilhelm's almost daily evening Tobacco Parliament. It was a changing group of freinds and ambassadors and in a total monarchy it could be a policy maker.

Posted by: Skip at April 30, 2017 04:00 AM (Ot7+c)

7 Does anyone look at pictures of nice houses/rooms like the library above, and say, 'That's gorgeous. I'd hate to be the one who has to keep it clean." It probably says something about my psyche that I do that- I hate to imagine what.

Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 04:01 AM (26lkV)

8 Does anyone look at pictures of nice houses/rooms like the library above, and say, 'That's gorgeous. I'd hate to be the one who has to keep it clean." It probably says something about my psyche that I do that- I hate to imagine what.

Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 09:01 AM (26lkV)


I do that. Which is why I wouldn't want to own an expensive, flashy car. I'd have to spend all of my time taking care of it.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 04:04 AM (CWrAB)

9 Good morning fellow book threadists. I am at a swap meet and posting on a tablet. Makes my typing even more difficult. Lots of good references in the post I can check out whenI get home.

Posted by: JTB at April 30, 2017 04:04 AM (5ZhDL)

10 You owe me a new pair of eyes.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 04:04 AM (sdi6R)

11 The Frontiersmen by Alan Eckert. Non-fiction. First of 4 volumes. If the history of the American Indian conflict with white settlers were expressed as a 24-hour clock, Little Big Horn happened at 1 minute to midnight. I decided that I wanted to learn about the preceding 23 hours and 59 minutes.

Posted by: mnw at April 30, 2017 04:05 AM (+iRBQ)

12 Does anyone look at pictures of nice houses/rooms like the library above, and say, 'That's gorgeous. I'd hate to be the one who has to keep it clean." It probably says something about my psyche that I do that- I hate to imagine what. Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 09:01 AM (26lkV) No, the level of dust helps me track where I've been in my stacks.

Posted by: Retired Buckey Cop is now an engineer at April 30, 2017 04:06 AM (5Yee7)

13 I have to say that Mr. Lucas's library is beautiful. I actually love all the table lamps most. He's spent his money well, which is more than can be said for many. Especially many in Hollywood!

Posted by: jocon307 at April 30, 2017 04:07 AM (4WPdG)

14 I read Randy Barnett's "Our Republican Constitution" and think it's a perfect fit for the folks on this site.  It's a history of our Constitution, but in particular the difference between a Constitution based on our individual rights (rights first, then government) as opposed to the rights of "The People", aka the majority, aka government (government first, then our rights).  Barnett is a real legal scholar, and provides a very useful synopsis of the important events and cases in which the Judiciary and the government as a whole began to deviate from its intended role, including Plessy, Slaughterhouse, Lochner, etc. 

The book can seem a bit gloomy when we see how far we've moved from the Founder's intent (and there is a useful discussion of original intent vs. original meaning), but he provides a bit of a roadmap in the end as to how we can begin recovering our rights and Constitution. 

I won't say the book is a thrilling read, but it's the kind of hard work you need to do if you want to be able to comment on our present predicament at a higher level than "activist judges suck".

It's actually the second in a series of books.  I'm reading the first now.  It's entitled "Restoring the Lost Constitution".

Posted by: pep at April 30, 2017 04:07 AM (LAe3v)

15 It also told of a academic who was brought into the Tobacco Parliament but turned into a drunk, he was used as a foil and entertainment act by some of the others ( mostly Generals) and episodes like walling up his room door so he couldn't find it and instead finding bears in a room.

Posted by: Skip at April 30, 2017 04:09 AM (Ot7+c)

16 There hasn't been a heck of a lot of reading this week at maison de yankee. The weather's been too nice to sit inside with a book, but I did re-read Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility. I enjoy almost all of her stuff, but I wonder how much of the comedy is lost because of changes in language and social mores. Certain characters are referred to as 'vulgar' or 'overly familiar, and I don't always see the gulf between that and the respectable characters, though it's more obvious in this book than some of Austen's other works.

I've finished my entry for the Amazon UK Storyteller contest and it's now being beta'd. Now I have to slap a cover on it- always the hardest part for me- put in any final edits, and it's ready to go.

Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 04:09 AM (26lkV)

17 Good Sunday morning, horde! That is a lovely library-love the staircase. Thanks for that collection of bush-craft books. I think I'd want them in hard copy, though, in case of apocalypse.

Posted by: April at April 30, 2017 04:09 AM (e8PP1)

18 I like the library o'the day - a two-decker living room with lots of books, and comfy leather chairs. It also looks like the sort of place where a body would be found at the beginning of one of those classic locked-room mysteries. Not much to report; there was a long power outage on Wednesday, so I had to break from work on the computer and in the house, and read. Knocked off a so-so mystery "Death on Nantucket" and posted a review. Started on Dean Snow "1777 - Tipping Point at Saratoga". So far - more of a re-telling of events, based on first-hand accounts by participants, many of whom were interested in justifying themselves to contemporaries. And - putting the final touches on the 4th Luna City book - "Luna City IV" - which I hope to have available by the end of May. (Somewhat ahead of schedule, at that.)

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at April 30, 2017 04:10 AM (xnmPy)

19 3: banned, blackballed, at the opening of the new tom hanks movie? who knows?

Posted by: chavez the hugo at April 30, 2017 04:11 AM (KP5rU)

20 Working my way through Terry Southern's book of short stories/essays/etc, "Red Dirt Marijuana". Man, that guy could write. If you can ignore or accept the archaic hippyisms, you're in for a masterclass in crisp, clean writing and using the exact right word to generate a strong sense image. Funny guy as well. Different than another writer at the time, Richard Brautigan,different tone and subject matter, but similar gift of simple, clean writing. Check it out.

Posted by: naturalfake at April 30, 2017 04:11 AM (9q7Dl)

21 7 Does anyone look at pictures of nice houses/rooms like the library above, and say, 'That's gorgeous. I'd hate to be the one who has to keep it clean."

I obviously don't know Mr. Lucas or his reading habits, but when I see a library like that, I have to wonder how much actual reading occurs in it.  It's a bit like those magazine-cover kitchens with flawlessly clean $500 pots and huge designer appliances.  Does any cooking actually happen there?

Posted by: pep at April 30, 2017 04:11 AM (LAe3v)

22 On the Kindle I read Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan which was recommended here a few weeks ago. This book, published in 1915 introduces Richard Hannay, Buchan's best known character. Buchan features Hannay in five other books. In this, Hannay get involved in a German plot to cause an incident which will lead to world war. It was a nice change of pace to read a book without any supernatural character or without any technological marvels. Hannay saves himself with just his own wits.

I also read the Shadow of Saganami by David Weber. This is the first of the Saganami Island series which, while related, is not part of the main Honor Harrington series. Saganami Island is the Manticore naval officer training facility. This book follows a group of Honor-trained midshipmen on their "snottie" cruise after graduation. As with most books in the Honor series, this one has plenty of political intrigue and well-written space battles.

I'm reading more on the Kindle since I won a Paperwhite about a month ago in an author's sweepstakes. The Paperwhite was very easy to get up and running and transferring my library from the Kindle app for PC was automatic. Just tap a title in the library and it downloads to the device in 3-5 seconds. The Paperwhite is great for reading in bed. It's light weight, easy to read, and the light from it doesn't bother Mr. Zoltan.

Posted by: Zoltan at April 30, 2017 04:11 AM (er9fQ)

23 Right wing yankee, if I could afford a home with a library like that, I could afford to pay someone a comfortable living to keep it clean. So, there's that.

Posted by: April at April 30, 2017 04:11 AM (e8PP1)

24 Thanks for the Bushcraft books! The last time I was "Primitive Camper" was in 2000.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:13 AM (6gk0M)

25 my library is in the bathroom. no pictures though.

Posted by: chavez the hugo at April 30, 2017 04:13 AM (KP5rU)

26 I read that as ........ DICTATOR and producer George Lucas.......

Posted by: lindarose at April 30, 2017 04:14 AM (kufk0)

27 It was unpleasantly warm yesterday so I was thinking about praying to Al Gore, but it's better today, so I guess I can put it off until summer.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at April 30, 2017 04:16 AM (vRcUp)

28 The Frontiersmen by Alan Eckert. Non-fiction. First of 4 volumes. If the history of the American Indian conflict with white settlers were expressed as a 24-hour clock, Little Big Horn happened at 1 minute to midnight. I decided that I wanted to learn about the preceding 23 hours and 59 minutes. Be aware that Eckert is often more interested in telling a good story than he is in figuring out what actually happened. His account of the massacre of Logan's family is...imaginative, for example. So don't take him too seriously.

Posted by: Grey Fox at April 30, 2017 04:17 AM (bZ7mE)

29 "my library is in the bathroom. no pictures though." -Posted by: chavez the hugo at April 30, 2017 09:13 AM (KP5rU) I don't have reading material in my bathrooms. You've got to look yourself in the mirror and understand that the window, air-freshener and vent-fan are NOT "optional".

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:18 AM (6gk0M)

30 Yankee it may have something to do with getting older. When I was younger I wanted to live in a big big house with lots of land. Now I want the land part but am perfectly happy with a small little bungalow. Less to take care of. That library of Lucas's does looking very inviting though.

Posted by: DeplorableJewells45 at April 30, 2017 04:18 AM (CNHr1)

31 I don't have reading material in my bathrooms. You've got to look yourself in the mirror and understand that the window, air-freshener and vent-fan are NOT "optional".

They're doing wonderful things with industrial HEPA filters now.

Posted by: pep at April 30, 2017 04:19 AM (LAe3v)

32 April-
Would you be willing to beta a werewolf novella? I have an actual sentence in my notes for that story- 'Based on an AoS Horde discussion. April wants to beta it.'
I don't even remember the discussion in question, but I'm always looking for beta readers.
Email is countrywoman 539 at google's free mail.

Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 04:20 AM (26lkV)

33 "They're doing wonderful things with industrial HEPA filters now." -Posted by: pep at April 30, 2017 09:19 AM (LAe3v) I have those on my vacuum cleaners.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:20 AM (6gk0M)

34 Oy. That pants link should come with a trigger warning. Love the Lucas Library. I want to go live there for a few months. I can't believe that book cake. Wow. I'm lucky if my layers don't slide off.

Posted by: Mertensia virginica at April 30, 2017 04:21 AM (sBOL1)

35 Whoops, c'est moi.

Posted by: bluebell at April 30, 2017 04:22 AM (sBOL1)

36 So many blessing come from Al Gore. Goretex, Neil Gorsuch, Jamie Gorelick, Edward Gorey, etc.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at April 30, 2017 04:22 AM (vRcUp)

37 I have a number of books, I inherited from an English professor auntie of mine. Quite nice I suppose, she liked to travel in the 40s through the 60s, particularly England, natch. They are a PITA though, and number 3,231 of Things I Need To Do. Seems like the Idea of a comfortable library is better than the reality sometime. Some great books in there. I will endeavor to persevere.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 04:23 AM (9razJ)

38 Morning all fellow bibliophiles.

Second revision of Amazon Storyteller UK short story submission is in the hands of test readers. Still no idea of what the title will be. And still working on cover art.

As for Lucas' library. Uhm maybe that is why the prequels stink, geez what a bunch of clutter. There is no Feng Shui of Library going on in that picture.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 04:23 AM (BlqBq)

39 thanks for mentioning the sale on Hans' book, OM! It's our group read for June, so today is the perfect day to buy. I have a review of it, linked in the sale announcement in my nic.

Posted by: @votermom @vm at April 30, 2017 04:24 AM (hMwEB)

40 Does anyone look at pictures of nice houses/rooms like the library above, and say, 'That's gorgeous. I'd hate to be the one who has to keep it clean." It probably says something about my psyche that I do that- I hate to imagine what. Posted by: right wing yankee --- In a similar vein - #1 son married way, way, way above our station and at the celebratory dinner in Midtown Manhattan I had to tell my Mom to sit down and let the staff clean the dirty dishes off of the tables. The hostess is a fine woman - she saw my Mom starting to take action and jumped in to do the same to save dear Mom embarrassment. Whatta gal.

Posted by: Tonypete at April 30, 2017 04:25 AM (tr2D7)

41 If I can afford a library like that I can afford to pay someone to clean it.

Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at April 30, 2017 04:25 AM (ZGMnP)

42 I've recently discovered James Lee Burke. I've read "House of the Rising Sun", "Wayfaring Strangers", and "The Jealous Kind". "Wayfaring Strangers" and "The Jealous Kind" are set in the Texas Gulf Coast in the early 1950s. All three books are full of historic references. Highly recommended. I'll be reading more.

Posted by: Frankly at April 30, 2017 04:25 AM (qJCCV)

43 The hostess is a fine woman - she saw my Mom starting to take action and jumped in to do the same to save dear Mom embarrassment. Whatta gal.

Both ladies are fine examples of real class, the type you can't buy.

Posted by: pep at April 30, 2017 04:27 AM (LAe3v)

44 I'm listening to Cryptonomicon on audiobook from the library. The friggin' thing is over 42 hours long. I'm hoping I can finish it before it disappears from my phone. I'm almost halfway through, and enjoying the heck out of it.

Posted by: bluebell at April 30, 2017 04:27 AM (sBOL1)

45 The Frontiersmen by Alan Eckert. Non-fiction. First of 4 volumes. If the history of the American Indian conflict with white settlers were expressed as a 24-hour clock, Little Big Horn happened at 1 minute to midnight. I decided that I wanted to learn about the preceding 23 hours and 59 minutes. Posted by: mnw at April 30, 2017 09:05 AM (+iRBQ) Lessee here. Little Big Horn occurred in 1876. That is roughly 141 years ago. 23 x 60 = 1380 1380 + 59 = 1439 1439 x 141 = 202899 I'm gonna say Eckert's math is way off. Or those damn oppressive white Anglo mastodons must've been giving the peaceful, native American mastodons hell when they sail over from Europe in their Mastodon-submarines.

Posted by: naturalfake at April 30, 2017 04:27 AM (9q7Dl)

46 Deep Thoughts: The person who proofread "Mein Kampf" was Grammar Nazi.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:27 AM (6gk0M)

47 As someone who never reads sci-fi, I got sucked into The Expanse series on Netflix and binge watched the entire two seasons. I am now reading the books, so I don't continue to dwell on the fact that it won't be back until 2018. My husband, who is a sci-fi nerd said it was just "meh". He couldn't get into it. Is it considered sci-fi for us sci-fi newbs? I am really enjoying it. Reminds me a little of Blade Runner.

Posted by: Abby at April 30, 2017 04:28 AM (HBU7W)

48 "In a similar vein - #1 son married way, way, way above our station and at the celebratory dinner in Midtown Manhattan I had to tell my Mom to sit down and let the staff clean the dirty dishes off of the tables. The hostess is a fine woman - she saw my Mom starting to take action and jumped in to do the same to save dear Mom embarrassment. Whatta gal." -Posted by: Tonypete at April 30, 2017 09:25 AM (tr2D7) *HAH!* Nice!

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:29 AM (6gk0M)

49 Am I the only one to point out the irony of a library of books on how to survive without modern technology being available on kindle?

Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 04:31 AM (ANIFC)

50 Lucas spent his money well on that library. I could retreat there for years and be totally content I think. Especially if the alternative was socializing with Hollywood rabble.

Posted by: IC at April 30, 2017 04:32 AM (gcme+)

51 The Expanse takes some time to get going but is worth it. The tv series I mean. The sex and foul language add nothing though.

Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at April 30, 2017 04:33 AM (ZGMnP)

52 So, people are just sounding smart when they say, someone is "inthebathroom" instead of saying he's on "the throne?" Always considered the latter to be more witty, myself.

Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 04:33 AM (d14ED)

53 "Am I the only one to point out the irony of a library of books on how to survive without modern technology being available on kindle? -Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 09:31 AM (ANIFC) Yes. You are smarter than the rest of us. Will a statue be of service to your honor, or shall we chisel granite into form?

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:34 AM (6gk0M)

54 The new Silver Chair movie sounds promising. I guess they will have to recast Eustace, which is kind of a shame because that kid's performance was one of the few good things about Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

I finished reading Caves of Steal by Asimov. It's all right, sort of a basic murder mystery underneath its retro-futuristic setting. Asimov was good at planting clues without knocking you over the head with them.

Posted by: Aunt Luna at April 30, 2017 04:35 AM (Zd2ZF)

55 I'm not a hoarder, but it is extremely difficult to throw away books. I have a complete set of The World Book that was a staple in our family growing up. I'm not going to cart it around, though. Nobody wants them, I'd have to imagine.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 04:36 AM (9razJ)

56 Mrs Cop and I were watch a "Garage Sale Mystery" on the Hallmark Chanel last night and the mystery revolved around the killer staging the scenes to match those in old mystery novels. One of the scenes had the word "Rache" written out in [fake]blood on the wall. I immediately tell my wife, "Oh, that's the Lauriston Gardens scene from A Study in Scarlet." It didn't play into the plot, but the characters in the movie are surprised that people are fascinated by Sherlock Holmes and *gasp* have regular meetings to discuss the adventures. I then tell my wife that I appear to be one of the fanatics they're talking about! ( )

Posted by: Retired Buckey Cop is now an engineer at April 30, 2017 04:38 AM (5Yee7)

57 On the Kindle I read Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan which was recommended here a few weeks ago. This book, published in 1915 introduces Richard Hannay, Buchan's best known character. Buchan features Hannay in five other books. In this, Hannay get involved in a German plot to cause an incident which will lead to world war. It was a nice change of pace to read a book without any supernatural character or without any technological marvels. Hannay saves himself with just his own wits. ----------- Everyone knows the Hitchcock film "The 39 Steps." But how many remember the 1978 adaptation, "The Thirty Nine Steps" starring Robert Powell as Hannay? Much closer to the source material, and IMHO, more enjoyable than Hitchcock's.

Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 04:38 AM (ANIFC)

58 I assume that Chelsea's next book will be a wonderful event, lots and lots of praise, awards, certificates, trophy's, sort of like all the bowling trophy's a friend has, made out of plastic, and he has to clean off the shelf and throw away some to make way for more plastic trophy's.   He has quit, doesn't bowl anymore..

Posted by: Colin at April 30, 2017 04:39 AM (VWNcW)

59 53 "Am I the only one to point out the irony of a library of books on how to survive without modern technology being available on kindle? -Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 09:31 AM (ANIFC) Yes. You are smarter than the rest of us. Will a statue be of service to your honor, or shall we chisel granite into form? Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) (T) at April 30, 2017 09:34 AM (6gk0M) Fifth head on Mt. Rushmore. With my face hidden behind a book.

Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 04:39 AM (ANIFC)

60 So, people are just sounding smart when they say, someone is "inthebathroom" instead of saying he's on "the throne?" Always considered the latter to be more witty, myself. Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 09:33 AM (d14ED) If I have to tell somebody what I'm about to do, I say I'm going to powder my nose. In a world with cocaine and homophobia, this creates confusion. More the better.

Posted by: BurtTC at April 30, 2017 04:39 AM (Pz4pT)

61 I do that. Which is why I wouldn't want to own an expensive, flashy car. I'd have to spend all of my time taking care of it. Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 09:04 AM (CWrAB) --- just rub it with a diaper

Posted by: George Peterson at April 30, 2017 04:40 AM (vChNs)

62 "So, people are just sounding smart when they say, someone is "inthebathroom" instead of saying he's on "the throne?" Always considered the latter to be more witty, myself." -Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 09:33 AM (d14ED) Something repeated is no longer "witty". Perhaps the word you are looking for is "cordial". Even then, "On The Throne" isn't exactly The Queen's Cordial Language. It is more of an informal colloquialism than anything else. Send any of your English Needs to Slapweasel Farms. We grow Bullshit on an Industrial Basis.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:40 AM (6gk0M)

63 I have the 1969 Encyclopedia Britannica that my parents bought in, get this, 1969. I'm beginning to think I am a hoarder, though. Books, LPs, CDs, National Geographics, etc. At least I don't hoard cats. I only have two of those.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 04:41 AM (sdi6R)

64 "Fifth head on Mt. Rushmore. With my face hidden behind a book." -Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 09:39 AM (ANIFC) *noted*

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:41 AM (6gk0M)

65 >>>51 The Expanse takes some time to get going but is worth it. The tv series I mean. The sex and foul language add nothing though. Posted by: WOPR - Nationalist at April 30, 2017 09:33 AM (ZGMnP)>>> Just started watching this and generally like it. Syfy takes has a wholly new approach when it paints the corporation as the bad guy. Really clever genius! Those writers/producers! How smart are they!?! I don't know what I'd do without the genius of low IQ SJWs who fancy themselves intelligencia.

Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 04:41 AM (d14ED)

66 So, people are just sounding smart when they say, someone is "inthebathroom" instead of saying he's on "the throne?" Always considered the latter to be more witty, myself. Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 09:33 AM (d14ED) Yup....."in the can" or "on the shitter" always work for me. If I want to class it up I just tell them so and so is "in the library".

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at April 30, 2017 04:42 AM (5VlCp)

67 Interesting trashy gossip trivia about the Lucas library:

The guy George hired to design and install the stained glass dome over the library wound up banging George's first wife, Marcia, because George was AWOL from the marriage for two years making Jedi.

She divorced George and married the glass guy. So George has to read his books in a room illuminated by the artwork of the guy who cuckolded him.

Posted by: OrcPimp at April 30, 2017 04:42 AM (WOMkd)

68 In The Expanse, the corporation as the bad guy was just one piece of the story. Yes, it's completely unoriginal, but I think there is more to it than just evil corporation wants to take over the galaxy with new bioweapon. But maybe I'm wrong.

Posted by: Abby at April 30, 2017 04:44 AM (HBU7W)

69 --- In a similar vein - #1 son married way, way, way above our station and at the celebratory dinner in Midtown Manhattan I had to tell my Mom to sit down and let the staff clean the dirty dishes off of the tables. The hostess is a fine woman - she saw my Mom starting to take action and jumped in to do the same to save dear Mom embarrassment. Whatta gal. Posted by: Tonypete at April 30, 2017 09:25 AM (tr2D7) My Grandmother had a napkin holder that said, " all the fine compliments and all the good wishes can never replace help with the dishes.".

Posted by: F.N.G. at April 30, 2017 04:45 AM (kiSdp)

70 So does George Lucas while reading under that dome mutter, "Marcia! Marcia! Marcia!"

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 04:45 AM (BlqBq)

71 Don't comment here much; so this may be considered off-topic, but we should note for the history books: Last night was the First Real News Correspondents' Dinner. The last portion was a dance-off, and I'm sure many of you visit TheGatewayPundit.com. James O'Keefe won the dance-off. Good American fun. ;0

Posted by: Bedtime Stories at April 30, 2017 04:46 AM (Kpbco)

72 Unfortunately the Left may finally have a real 'Hate' crime on campus in Kentucky. I bet the Lefty blogs are going crazy.

Posted by: Jack Sock at April 30, 2017 04:47 AM (IDPbH)

73 >>>Something repeated is no longer "witty". Perhaps the word you are looking for is "cordial". Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) (T) at April 30, 2017 09:40 AM (>>> Ah, yes. But mine was merely a tired jest.

Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 04:47 AM (d14ED)

74 An adjective that should not be used with the word 'snogging' is cordial. No.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 04:48 AM (BlqBq)

75 The guy George hired to design and install the stained glass dome over the library wound up banging George's first wife, Marcia, because George was AWOL from the marriage for two years making Jedi.

Posted by: OrcPimp at April 30, 2017 09:42 AM (WOMkd)


This is most unfortunate. I've read that it was Marcia's editing that turned Star Wars Ep. IV from an OK movie to a really good movie. Particularly the aerial dogfight battle around the Death Star.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 04:49 AM (CWrAB)

76 45 The math us mine, not Eckert's. It's an analogy, see? The white-Indian fighting in North America started BEFORE the Mayflower, and continued desultorily for about 275 yrs. 1607-1876, appx, & that excludes the wars in New France and the Spanish-Indian fighting too.

Posted by: mnw at April 30, 2017 04:51 AM (+iRBQ)

77 >>>68 In The Expanse, the corporation as the bad guy was just one piece of the story. Yes, it's completely unoriginal, but I think there is more to it than just evil corporation wants to take over the galaxy with new bioweapon. But maybe I'm wrong. Posted by: Abby at April 30, 2017 09:44 AM (HBU7W)>>> You're not wrong. And I wasn't kidding when I said I generally like it. Doesn't mean I'm not sick of the stupid, unoriginal SJW nonsense that is a cancer upon the genre. It'd be one thing if the clueless knuckle draggers could be original about it, but they push the same dull garbage every time.

Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 04:52 AM (d14ED)

78 She divorced George and married the glass guy. So George has to read his books in a room illuminated by the artwork of the guy who cuckolded him.

Posted by: OrcPimp at April 30, 2017 09:42 AM (WOMkd)


Maybe that's why he's not there much.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 04:52 AM (CWrAB)

79 re: Awakening to The Fakening Noted shrink Ace O. Spades: "It's time to add Munchausen Syndrome (Social Justice Warrior type) to the DSM psychiatric manual. This is a fairly major psychological problem now." A real epidemic. Not a fakey, inanimate "Gun Violence Epidemic", but an real epidemic that real hoaxers are suffering from in droves. A century ago, people valued gold and would go as far the Yukon to get it. Today we value Glamorous Victim Status and will go even farther to have it. It's crazy how people will stab, punch, bruise, assault, shave, graffiti and perjure themselves to get it. They'll smear feces on themselves, rip their clothes, start fires, lie to reporters and e-mail themselves threats and blackmail just to obtain it. But the payoffs can be huge: fame, fortune, celebrity, scholarships, endowed chairs, tenure, Pulitzers Prizes, instant steet cred, magazine covers, grants, federal laws bearing your name, famous people fawning over you, actors portraying you in Hollywood blockbusters, book sales, movie rights, rock stars singing your song, the moral high ground, trips to the White House, get-out-of-jail free cards to riot and burn down your town, the ability to discredit, silence or even jail your opponents--and that's just a partial list. When you think about that way, you'd be kinda' crazy NOT to.

Posted by: The Gipper Lives at April 30, 2017 04:52 AM (Ndje9)

80 "Ah, yes. But mine was merely a tired jest." -Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 09:47 AM (d14ED) Understood. Unlike Anna Puma, whose prose is unintelligible by the likes of me. "So does George Lucas while reading under that dome mutter, "Marcia! Marcia! Marcia!"" -Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 09:45 AM (BlqBq) This is some sort of non-Brady Bunch humor that can only be appreciated by well-read scholars and "Award-Types". I fall cleanly short of understanding the brilliance of imagination. I'd need a Dennis Miller interpreter.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 04:54 AM (6gk0M)

81 Slapweasel gets his talking points from a can of alphabet soup?

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 04:56 AM (BlqBq)

82 I returned my first science fiction book ever the other day for its political, bigoted crap. And it's really too bad, because I enjoyed the underlying story. I've read about 1,000+ science fiction books so far in my lifetime, and didn't finish only a handful of those. I have generally given a book a full chance to make its case. But, I'm just about fed up with the whole industry at this point.

Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 04:57 AM (d14ED)

83 Old encyclopedias can be very informative, about what they didn't know.
Since encyclopaedic style-books call for a settled sense of surety, just the fact ma'am, every single one of them is a real laugher just one generation later. And, what with updates, new editions, and all, they usually don't survive.

One of the better lines I've heard is the 1927 Britannica, which wasn't revised for a generation, and its flat statement under "Jazz" that two instruments which would never be utilized in the idiom were the violin and the flute, since they were incapable of hot intonation. See, if somebody hadn't hung onto the old copy, we wouldn't know that scholars thought that.
___________
Also, I'm always defending Joseph "Prince of Darkness" Lucas, since he was a great humanitarian, founded a tech school, and never worked in electricity in his entire teetotalling life. However, I'll go first here with the observation:  The real Lucas Library would have to be all in Braille.

Posted by: Stringer Davis[/i][/b] at April 30, 2017 04:57 AM (H5rtT)

84 Jeez-a-lou! If I could ask for prayers for the Missouri right now, that would be great. We are getting pounded by relentless rain. I drove from KC to Kirksville (mid north of state) to St. Louis the past 2 days. Every stream and creek was out of its banks, flooded into farmer's fields. It's planting season right now; not much of anything is getting done. We had a rain event like this last Dec/Jan, and my company was almost underwater. And, there's a huge blob of rain just spinning over eastern MO right now. It's an amazing amount of water.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at April 30, 2017 04:57 AM (ty7RM)

85 The guy George hired to design and install the stained glass dome over the library wound up banging George's first wife, Marcia, because George was AWOL from the marriage for two years making Jedi. She divorced George and married the glass guy. So George has to read his books in a room illuminated by the artwork of the guy who cuckolded him. Posted by: OrcPimp at April 30, 2017 09:42 AM (WOMkd) The Ewoks were worth it.

Posted by: George Lucas at April 30, 2017 04:57 AM (ANIFC)

86 So, people are just sounding smart when they say, someone is "inthebathroom" instead of saying he's on "the throne?" Always considered the latter to be more witty, myself. --- grew up in a house with 7 people and 2 bathrooms. Well did we play the game of thrones

Posted by: George Peterson at April 30, 2017 04:58 AM (vChNs)

87 She divorced George and married the glass guy. So George has to read his books in a room illuminated by the artwork of the guy who cuckolded him.

Posted by: OrcPimp at April 30, 2017 09:42 AM (WOMkd)


Maybe that's why he's not there much.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 09:52 AM (CWrAB)


And why it's so shiny and neat. Maybe the whole thing was a conspiracy hatched by his cleaning lady to get out of extra work

Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 04:58 AM (26lkV)

88 Earlier this week, there was a link to Wrongthinks to download free books by sci-fi/fantasy authors who have run afoul of the SJWs. I am currently reading Sarah Hoyt's book, "Darkship Thieves", and boy-howdy*, does she ever skewer the left of the early 21st century. She mocks transgenders, multiple genders feminism, race privilege, etc. Basically says its all that's wrong with the USA Today. It's brilliant!! No wonder the left hates her!!! * No, I didn't spend the week-end at the Bluegrass Festival, why would you think that?

Posted by: Scott-High Plains Deplorable at April 30, 2017 04:58 AM (2tbcA)

89 Oh and, my 3 kitteh's are losing their teeny, tiny minds right now. They keep looking at me like, "MAKE IT STOP!!"

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at April 30, 2017 04:58 AM (ty7RM)

90 Speaking of survival, and we were weren't we, I've purchased the book Deep Survival through Audible. I believe it was referenced in the Timothy Ferris book Tools of the Titans. Deep Survival, I believe, investigates survivors and what's sets them apart. When I say survivors I mean those people who get caught in extreme conditions and come out alive, while the majority. The topic intrigues me. By the way, the strangest recommendation in Tools of Titans is macrodosing with LSD to reset your brain. Don't think I'll try that.

Posted by: Northernlurker, Phillips screwdriver of the gods at April 30, 2017 04:58 AM (nBr1j)

91 Brave Sir Robin, the thundering storm front you mention is just rolling through Jackson, MS right now. Woke me from my slumber but luckily did not roll me out of bed from the reverberations.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 04:59 AM (BlqBq)

92 I don't mind being an "everyman". Yes he does. Shut-Up, Italicized Voice! I don't mind not knowing All The Things. He wants to know, because he's pretty vain. Damn you, Random Italicized Voice! You are a cancer upon my soul. He's pissed because he's not that smart. I give up.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:00 AM (6gk0M)

93 Good morning 'rons and 'ettes aficionados of the printed word. Am making my way through a reread of Independent People by Icelandic icon Halldor Laxness with my book group (my choice) and am thoroughly enjoying it, in large part because the main character is a curmudgeon who just wants to be left the fuck alone (I say that as someone who daily wants to take a sledgehammer to my landline and mailbox but for Mrs Hate preventing those courses of action). Plus I've been to Iceland since I read this the first time and better understand the incredibly harsh conditions there and just how difficult it would be to make a living raising sheep. Am almost finished Patrick Dawson's The Beer Geek Handbook: Living a Life Ruled by Beer and it's a quick and enjoyable read if you like kissing the hops. With craft beers being what they are today, it's a great time to be a beer drinker. Of course, as with anything, there comes a level of fandom that just goes over the fucking top, and some of these people probably don't get their ashes hauled much. But as a quick and fun read it's pretty good. Am getting close to the end of Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series with The Commodore and will be sad when this extended portrayal of a great friendship between two very different but highly accomplished people, all begun on the first page of the first book because of a shared affinity for music. Because of intrigue among embedded intelligence agents, Maturin has to gather all of his hard assets PDQ to keep them from being seized when he's at sea. Made some progress in John Guy's Elizabeth: The Forgotten Years which covers when she would go visit people during the summer. First of all, she brought a gazillion people with her so feeding that mobile village was a major logistical nightmare. Second, she was such a spiteful bitch that she would do things like going hunting in a private forest and kill every fucking deer just because she was pissed off that the woman of the house outbid her for a lute she wanted.

Posted by: Captain Hate at April 30, 2017 05:00 AM (y7DUB)

94 "Fifth head on Mt. Rushmore. With my face hidden behind a book." -Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 09:39 AM (ANIFC) ---- Green Eggs and Ham?

Posted by: George Peterson at April 30, 2017 05:01 AM (vChNs)

95 "Slapweasel gets his talking points from a can of alphabet soup?" -Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 09:56 AM (BlqBq) As Andrew Breitbart once said... So?

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:01 AM (6gk0M)

96 I started watching "The Expanse" last night. I'm liking it, but I have a dumb complaint. Most of the guys look alike - white, dark hair, scruffy beards - and I have trouble telling who's who.

Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 05:01 AM (ANIFC)

97 Everyone knows the Hitchcock film "The 39 Steps." But how many remember the 1978 adaptation, "The Thirty Nine Steps" starring Robert Powell as Hannay? Much closer to the source material, and IMHO, more enjoyable than Hitchcock's. Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 09:38 AM (ANIFC) If you enjoyed "39 Steps," the sequel "Greenmantle" is even better IMO. Unfortunately it has never been adapted into film. Hitchcock was once planning to make one with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, but it never got off the ground. A pity, because it could have been one of the all-time classics.

Posted by: Biggs Darklighter at April 30, 2017 05:02 AM (60SwY)

98 Here comes the rain, falling on my house like despair.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 05:03 AM (BlqBq)

99 That Storm system was supposed to hit Houston but somehow passed us. Unfortunately it struck in Canton and five are confirmed dead.

Posted by: Jack Sock at April 30, 2017 05:03 AM (IDPbH)

100 >>>96 I started watching "The Expanse" last night. I'm liking it, but I have a dumb complaint. Most of the guys look alike - white, dark hair, scruffy beards - and I have trouble telling who's who. Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 10:01 AM (ANIFC)>>> Hah! No kidding. Whenever they showed a vid and we were expected to recognize the guy in the shot, I always guessed wrong!

Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 05:04 AM (d14ED)

101 We are getting pounded by relentless rain. I drove from KC to Kirksville (mid north of state) to St. Louis the past 2 days. Every stream and creek was out of its banks, flooded into farmer's fields. It's planting season right now; not much of anything is getting done. I will pray to Al Gore. He can fix this.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at April 30, 2017 05:05 AM (vRcUp)

102 I pulled out my collection of Calvin And Hobbes books last week. Bill Watterson was a genius.

Posted by: Jack Sock at April 30, 2017 05:05 AM (IDPbH)

103 (scroll, scroll, scroll) And another thing: I'm going to have to check out "Ropes and Cords" and "Knots and Lashings" for, ummmm, camping. Yeah, camping.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at April 30, 2017 05:05 AM (ty7RM)

104 Yeah, you can tell the drought's over in Cali when the Governor changes the federal emergency aid demands from "Send Water" to "Take Water."

Like Mencken's transit from barbarism to decadence, there are no stops in between.

Posted by: Stringer Davis[/i][/b] at April 30, 2017 05:06 AM (H5rtT)

105 At the moment I'm reading Tooth and Nail by Ian Rankin, which is an earlier book in the DI John Rebus. It's the only one in the series set outside Scotland. In this instalment Rebus is not yet set in stone as the guy who is constant trouble with his superiors and clearly drinks and smokes too much. Rebus is a favourite police/mystery character.

Posted by: Northernlurker, Phillips screwdriver of the gods at April 30, 2017 05:07 AM (nBr1j)

106 83 One of the better lines I've heard is the 1927 Britannica, which wasn't revised for a generation, and its flat statement under "Jazz" that two instruments which would never be utilized in the idiom were the violin and the flute, since they were incapable of hot intonation. See, if somebody hadn't hung onto the old copy, we wouldn't know that scholars thought that. Posted by: Stringer Davis at April 30, 2017 09:57 AM (H5rtT) I saw Stephane Grappelli live once. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St%C3%A9phane_Grappelli

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 05:07 AM (sdi6R)

107 A thank you to votermom for mentioning the Elise Hyatt (Sarah Hoyt) Daring findsmysteryseries. I'mjusta oupleof chapters into the first one and Imust have laughed out a few times. I like my cozy mysteries with humor, like the liturgical mystery series.

Posted by: JTB at April 30, 2017 05:12 AM (5ZhDL)

108 Yes, OregonMuse, Marcia Lucas got an Academy Award for her editing work on Episode IV. As for their marriage, 'tis a shame when such things happen, but happen they will if you forsake your responsibilities for your career. George went off to England in '81 to make Jedi, leaving Marcia alone in a half-built house with their baby adopted daughter and, evidently, a very hunky yet empathetic stained glass master.

To bring this back to the book thread, I read about all this in a well-written unauthorized biography about Lucas called "Skywalking: the life and films of George Lucas". You can usually find copies in thrift stores for 50 cents.

Here's a link to a better photo of the library, showing the George Lucas Memorial CuckDome in all its glory:

https://tinyurl.com/mbgxv78

(And really, that's one hell of a glass dome. Say what you will about George, he certainly had a knack for hiring the very best. Even Marcia would agree.)

Posted by: OrcPimp at April 30, 2017 05:13 AM (WOMkd)

109 Someone here should be interested in this book offer. Naval and Military Press out of the UK is offering "WARSHIPS OF THE GREAT WAR ERA: A History in Ship Models", which showcases the model ship collection of the National Maritime Museum in Grenwich, for 5 pounds, marked down from 25 pounds. http://tinyurl.com/jw6eann

Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 05:13 AM (ANIFC)

110 Thank you for the link to free stuff and the link to Bill Mauldin on the life of the common soldier in the revolution. Amazon recommended to me a book based on books on my kindle : Wellington's Men by W. H. Fitchett (ASIN: B016VC8WN2) a collection of four autobiographies by men who were at Waterloo. First hand accounts of the British Army man. (99 cents) Several things I learned from this book. First, the privation suffered by the men in the field, and second the scale of the fighting. Tens of thousands of men in a small area, using nearly the same fighting tactics as the Greeks and Romans. Masses of men in a frontal assault on fortified positions using bayonets in hand to hand combat and in some cases, overrunning the defenders. Infantry standing in an open field against cavalry. Casualties in the multiple thousands. Entire artillery companies wiped out standing to their guns. It is difficult to understand how anyone could survive, yet many did even as their time in the field left them wrecked for the rest of their lives. Also, I was reminded of the capricious nature of war; you are standing in a line of men, and the man next to you is killed, yet you remain untouched. Or something explodes near you and you escape without a scratch while those around you suffer terrible injuries. There are several gruesome examples in this book. Also I learned of wars fought by England that I had never heard about in high school world history. Britain was fighting a war somewhere around the globe for two or three hundred years. It made me realize that 'peace' after WWII wasn't the normal condition; that war is the normal condition. Even for the US, the 'peace' after WWII included Korea, and South Vietnam, and now Iraq (twice, and perhaps, still), Afghanistan, Libya, Syria, and even Berkley. We are overdue for another big one, and the way it looks, we're going to get it.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at April 30, 2017 05:14 AM (Y8Ndm)

111 I won the 50/50 last night, so I will be buying lots of books in the future. 19 3: banned, blackballed, at the opening of the new tom hanks movie? who knows? Posted by: chavez the hugo at April 30, 2017 09:11 AM Emma Watson is cancer to a movie. She was good in the Harry Potter movies because she can play know it all very well.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at April 30, 2017 05:15 AM (dKiJG)

112 If you enjoyed "39 Steps," the sequel "Greenmantle" is even better IMO. Unfortunately it has never been adapted into film. Hitchcock was once planning to make one with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, but it never got off the ground. A pity, because it could have been one of the all-time classics. Posted by: Biggs Darklighter at April 30, 2017 10:02 AM (60SwY) ---------- Thank you. I didn't realize there was a sequel. I just put it on hold at the library. I liked the 2008 movie done by the BBC of The 39 Steps, too.

Posted by: bluebell at April 30, 2017 05:16 AM (sBOL1)

113 We had a pretty intense thunderstorm about 5 AM Saturday morning. It woke me up. One of the cats came up on the bed, seeking reassurance. The other one probably just slept through it. It's what he does best.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 05:16 AM (sdi6R)

114 people are fascinated by Sherlock Holmes and *gasp* have regular meetings to discuss the adventures. I then tell my wife that I appear to be one of the fanatics they're talking about! - And don't call me Shirley. - Sherlock Holmes

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks at April 30, 2017 05:16 AM (Nwg0u)

115 In World War Z Brad Pitt tells us that those who move survice. Movement is life. I suspect that is true.

Posted by: blaster at April 30, 2017 05:17 AM (HV1LS)

116 I pulled out my collection of Calvin And Hobbes books last week. Bill Watterson was a genius. Yeah, I went through a 2 year period where I read and re-read every book he had out. What's interesting to me was: he was laugh out loud funny, and was never particularly mean, gross, snotty or sarcastic. He just showcased the absurdity of the human condition through the eyes of an 8(?) year old kid and his pet tiger.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at April 30, 2017 05:18 AM (ty7RM)

117 Movement is life.

Unless you are hiding from the sniper.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 05:18 AM (BlqBq)

118 Anyone read comics? My boys love illustrated stories; the older having read the entire illustrated Bible that they recently came out with. But I won't get him any comics because they seem to have been culturally appropriated by the daft and mentally ill. Any good suggestions by anyone more intimately familiar with the genre?

Posted by: gm at April 30, 2017 05:18 AM (d14ED)

119 The weather right now is warm and sunny but earlier in the week was cool and rainy. Perfect reading weather for contemplative books, good black tea or coffee, or the occasional glass of port or madeira.

Posted by: JTB at April 30, 2017 05:19 AM (5ZhDL)

120 For all the authors here , my favorite author, Steven Pressfield has written a book titled Nobody Wants to Read Your Shit : Why that is and what you can do about it. I don't intend on reading it because I'm not an author but I thought some might be interested.

Posted by: Jack Sock at April 30, 2017 05:19 AM (IDPbH)

121 I'll have to check out that survival library. One of my favorites in that genre is Camping & Woodcraft by Horace Kephart, inventor of the Kephart Knife. It's from the early 20th century so a lot of it is out of date - you ain't gonna be packin' laudanum in your First Aid Kit, and cannabis sativa is listed under "useful plants" (for ROPEMAKING, not that other use!) But it's still an awesome read, and the sections on campfire cookery, shooting in the woods, using a compass, etc. etc. are as useful today as when he wrote them.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at April 30, 2017 05:19 AM (ul9CR)

122 My youngest daughter gave me a fun little book for my B-day: "Military Miscellany." It has all kinds of factoids from the U.S. military. Very interesting. You could blow through it on a rainy afternoon.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at April 30, 2017 05:21 AM (ty7RM)

123 "Yeah, I went through a 2 year period where I read and re-read every book he had out. What's interesting to me was: he was laugh out loud funny, and was never particularly mean, gross, snotty or sarcastic. He just showcased the absurdity of the human condition through the eyes of an 8(?) year old kid and his pet tiger." -Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at April 30, 2017 10:18 AM (ty7RM) *amen*

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:21 AM (6gk0M)

124 I am currently reading Sarah Hoyt's book, "Darkship Thieves", and boy-howdy*, does she ever skewer the left of the early 21st century. She mocks transgenders, multiple genders feminism, race privilege, etc. Basically says its all that's wrong with the USA Today. It's brilliant!! No wonder the left hates her!!!

Posted by: Scott-High Plains Deplorable at April 30, 2017 09:58 AM (2tbcA)


( *moves Darkship Thieves to top of stack* )

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 05:22 AM (CWrAB)

125 I have a copy of Mystic Warriors of the Plains. Apparently some of the illustrations therein were what that quack pseudo Indian professor out in Colo. copied and claimed as his own original artwork. It's obvious. All those folks have no problem bumping the real McCoy out of a scholarship or seat in class. And then start talking shit about the gubbmint.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 05:23 AM (9razJ)

126 Bill Watterson would still be considered a first-rate artistic genius of the comic medium even if he had never written a word of dialogue.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 05:24 AM (sdi6R)

127 Staying with relatives, they all seem to have a bookcase with a set of old,dusty encyclopedias, which no one looks at anymore.  At least when the EMF hits, they will have something historic to read. 

Posted by: Colin at April 30, 2017 05:24 AM (VWNcW)

128 Reading the Expanse (book), one of the main themes is that Earth is full of people on Welfare. There is an exchange between a waitress and a the Martian Marine, that in order to go to College you must WORK for at least 2 years to prove to be eligible for College. Mars and People of the Rim view Earth as full of people that are lazy and just want thier welfare check.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at April 30, 2017 05:25 AM (dKiJG)

129 I don't need to do a better job. I just need better PR on the job I do -----wisdom of Calvin

Posted by: Jack Sock at April 30, 2017 05:25 AM (IDPbH)

130 If it ain't Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, it ain't Sherlock Holmes. Q.E.D.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 05:25 AM (9razJ)

131 Since this got zero notice from last Monday's ONT (and proof, btw of my contention that even Bob from the NSA quits reading AoS at 4 am), and is book related, I repost:
 
549 Robert Pirsig, author of Zen And The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance, has died. Age 88, iirc.

I have a copy of the book, and have reread it probably 3 times over the years. His philosophical investigations into quality make the book worth a read alone. And philosophy bores me for the most part.

And the fact that his musings drove him bugfuck nuts adds a little weight to his efforts.

RIP, Mr. Pirsig.

Posted by: GnuBreed at April 25, 2017 04:12 AM (wTwJ2)

Posted by: GnuBreed [/i] [/b] at April 30, 2017 05:27 AM (wTwJ2)

132 Brave Sir Robin you must live close to me. I'm in Lee's Summit and while the whole town can never flood, we are definitely water logged. I hear more and heavier rain is on the way. Just fucking great.

Posted by: DeplorableJewells45 at April 30, 2017 05:27 AM (CNHr1)

133 120 Steven Pressfield has written a book titled Nobody Wants to Read Your Shit Sheeit! Ain't Nobody Got Time For Dat!

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 05:28 AM (9razJ)

134 Yesterday I took my elderly mom to one of those used book sales where you pay 5 bucks for a paper sack and fill it with as many books as you can fit. This one is a big sale done twice a year and it's a favorite of both of us. Among other finds, I scored an enormous illustrated complete Shakespeare about 7 inches thick and weighs a ton, a 1970's reprint of a mid-19th century edition. And a very old book of Robin Hood tales.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at April 30, 2017 05:28 AM (ul9CR)

135 I think there is more to it than just evil corporation wants to take over the galaxy with new bioweapon The "vomit zombie" scene, as well as the chest-beating about racism (against Belters) and the Evil Corporation Of Evil, was when I deleted the book off the Kindle. I was thinking to myself "yeah, someone's taking this $h!t to Hollywood".

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 30, 2017 05:29 AM (6FqZa)

136 Hard Luck Hank, is probably the funniest Sci-FI series you will ever read, I can't recommend the Audiobook version enough. The Book is read as HANK and I found myself laughing throughout the books. It just stupid fun NO POLITICS NO SJW crap. Give it a read and you won't be disappointed.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at April 30, 2017 05:31 AM (dKiJG)

137 Among other finds, I scored an enormous illustrated complete Shakespeare about 7 inches thick and weighs a ton, a 1970's reprint of a mid-19th century edition.

And a very old book of Robin Hood tales.

Posted by: WhatWhatWhat? at April 30, 2017 10:28 AM (ul9CR)


While the rest of the county is staring at their smart phones waiting for something to happen. 

Posted by: Colin at April 30, 2017 05:32 AM (VWNcW)

138 Just fucking great. I live on the other side of the state, but this is an epic amount of precip. I haven't looked at totals, but it's a lot of rain. The Meramec river floods pretty easily, I'm going to drive up later today and look. I don't even want to see the forecast. I have streams of water in my basement, but I learned a long time ago that finished basements in these parts are just an insurance claim waiting to happen.

Posted by: Brave Sir Robin at April 30, 2017 05:32 AM (ty7RM)

139 Bob (Pirsig) probably did a lot of Acid and Peyote. That is probably a contributing factor to the bugnuts quotient. Jus sayin'.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 05:32 AM (9razJ)

140 "So many blessing come from Al Gore. Goretex, Neil Gorsuch, Jamie Gorelick, Edward Gorey, etc." Heeeeeeey...wait a MINUTE!

Posted by: Zombie Gore Vidal at April 30, 2017 05:33 AM (1aMQH)

141 The cake is a lie.

Posted by: GLaDOS at April 30, 2017 05:33 AM (6Hrsu)

142 I've thought about writing a book called "Bikes, Swings and Rocks". If anyone can write a book from the perspective of a ten-year-old boy, I suppose I could.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:35 AM (6gk0M)

143 Movement is life. Unless you are hiding from the sniper. Posted by: Anna Puma "A relationship, I think, is like a shark. You know? It has to constantly move forward or it dies. And I think what we got on our hands is a dead shark." - Woody Allen

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at April 30, 2017 05:35 AM (vRcUp)

144 RIP, Mr. Pirsig.

Posted by: GnuBreed at April 25, 2017 04:12 AM (wTwJ2)


Thanks, I was going to mention this today, but the obit got bumped, so hopefully I'll get to it next week.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 05:35 AM (CWrAB)

145 The hate crime "epidemic" is a classic moral panic - like the satanic ritual abuse of children back in the 1980s.

Posted by: PJ at April 30, 2017 05:37 AM (E49yS)

146 Good morning 'rons and 'ettes, my new editions of Lord of the World and The Iron Heel are all done and are now available at this link: http://www.monroestpress.com/Science-Fiction-.html Both books feature introductions by yours truly noting the parallels between the events depicted in these books and later/current developments. If you don't mind spending a few bucks for a "real" paperback that you can mishandle, write notes in, lend, etc. give them a look. Thanks!

Posted by: Secret Square at April 30, 2017 05:38 AM (9WuX0)

147 Forecast isn't good Robin but the other side of Missouri is a ways away.. maybe you won't get hit too hard, or it could go the other way. I just know we are getting hit again later this afternoon. I'm hunkered down. No plans to leave the house today. Going to make a big pot of ham and beans.

Posted by: DeplorableJewells45 at April 30, 2017 05:39 AM (CNHr1)

148 -Posted by: PJ at April 30, 2017 10:37 AM (E49yS) Dungeons and Dragons strengthens the Occult Mindset of children. More murders by children have happened because we have reported them more often. Back to you, Irv.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:39 AM (6gk0M)

149 Slapweasel: Wha?

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 30, 2017 05:40 AM (gIyP7)

150 3 books involving H. P. Lovecrafft: "in the mountains of madness", W. Scott Poole. Bah, a huffpo scribbler with agendas n issues. Disapointing. "Lovecraft's book", Richard A. Lupoff. Novel with all the right mcguffins but runs out of steam. But "The Chinatown death cloud peril", Paul Malmont, satifies like a Chesterfield. Characters include pulp authors of 20s-30s and a zombie HPL.

Posted by: Adobe Juan Kenobe at April 30, 2017 05:42 AM (wB/nH)

151 The Expanse takes some time to get going but is worth it. The tv series I mean. The sex and foul language add nothing though.

Nonsense on stilts.

Posted by: DaveA[/i][/b][/s] at April 30, 2017 05:43 AM (FhXTo)

152 Syfy takes has a wholly new approach when it paints the corporation as the bad guy.

Wait for it.

Posted by: Errinwright ReAssholes[/i][/b][/s] at April 30, 2017 05:44 AM (FhXTo)

153 I watched one of those author presentations on CSPAN by a guy who did a biography of Bill Mauldin which had some interesting things. The front was so horrible that Mauldin didn't think he could make himself go back. Corespondent Ernie Pyle told him that the only way to do it was with alcohol. Mauldin followed that advise a little too well and was a raging alcoholic with a string of failed marriages and broken families. Immediately after the war he was a big star but blew it because of his vociferous anti-McCarthyism anti-racism positions which his employers could not abide. Newspapers would often change his cartoons to tone them down. When ordered to tone down certain cartoons he would ramp them up instead. Audie Murphy treated him with contempt as a REMF which is both understandable and doesn't reflect well on Murphy.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks at April 30, 2017 05:45 AM (Nwg0u)

154 Patrick from Ohio, the trope that Earth is the sump of Humanity isn't exactly a new thing if you are trying to get me to read The Expanse.

Niven's Flatlanders in his Known Universe are the closest to those in this series. Of course a bit further afield is Pournelle's Falkenberg/s Legion. And another lesser known is Glen Cook's Starfisher Trilogy.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 05:45 AM (cfNRa)

155 My daughter has to read "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett for sophomore English. I am reading it with her, and it's better than I expected so far. It's set in 1962/1963 Jackson, Mississippi and is about the separate but not equal worlds of the white ladies and their black maids and nannies. I'm about halfway through, Medger Evers was just murdered.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at April 30, 2017 05:46 AM (THS4q)

156 -Posted by: Trimegistus at April 30, 2017 10:40 AM (gIyP7) PJ mentioned how there is an "epidemic" of "Hate Crimes", when we know there is not. As he compared them to the Eighties "Satanic Rituals" that didn't exist, I compared them to the correlation to Dungeons and Dragons, which was also a news story at the time. If you played D&D, you "believed in the occult". You were more likely to sacrifice cats to Mordenkanien because reasons.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:47 AM (6gk0M)

157 "The hate crime "epidemic" is a classic moral panic - like the satanic ritual abuse of children back in the 1980s." I know, that's crazy talk! "Without further ado, we begin this journey - for no particular reason - with the aforementioned Phil Hartman, who was a highschool friend of Lynette "Squeaky" Fromme, who later became a disciple of Charlie Manson, a jailhouse correspondent of John Hinckley, and the attempted assassin of President Gerald Ford, who was once a roommate of modeling entrepreneur Harry Conover, whose wife was the infamous Candy Jones, who was 'treated' by CIA-linked hypnotist William Joseph Bryan, who also 'treated' the purported Boston Strangler, Albert DeSalvo, whose name was written repetitively throughout the diaries of Sirhan Sirhan, who was also 'treated' by Bryan, who served as the technical director on The Manchurian Candidate, which was directed by John Frankenheimer, at whose beach house a dinner was held on June 5, 1968 whose attendees included "Mama" Cass Elliot, Roman Polanski, and Sharon Tate, who was killed just over a year later by followers of Charlie Manson, whose music was recorded by Doris Day's son, music producer Terry Melcher, who lived with girlfriend Candace Bergen at 10050 Cielo Drive the year before it became a slaughterhouse after being rented by Polanski, who initially was slated to pen the screenplay for Day of the Dolphin, which purported to tell the story of Dr. John Lilly, who was a friend of Timothy Leary, whose Mellon family-owned Millbrook estate was frequently visited by Dr. Max "Feelgood" Jacobson, who once 'treated' Judy Garland and who served as the personal physician of John Kennedy, whose assassination prompted the shelving of the film The Manchurian Candidate by its star, Frank Sinatra, who was a frequent companion of fellow 'Brat Packer' Sammy Davis, Jr., who was an acknowledged member of Anton LaVey's Church of Satan, from where Manson recruited killers Bobby "Cupid" Beausoleil and Susan "Sexy Sadie" Atkins, who confessed to her cellmates that she had stabbed to death actress Sharon Tate, who was inducted into witchcraft on the set of the Polanski-directed film The Fearless Vampire Killers by Alexander "King of the Witches" Saunders, who received 'training' as a child from Aleister Crowley, whose followers included Anton LaVey and fellow Church of Satan member Kenneth Anger, who was the roommate (and probable lover) of Family member Bobby Beausoleil, who once appeared in an underground film titled Mondo Hollywood, which also featured hairdresser and Manson victim Jay Sebring, who was a former lover of Sharon Tate, who was a friend of a wealthy widow named Charlene Caffritz, who played host to - and filmed the exploits of - Charlie and some of his girls, who also lived for a time with Beach Boy Dennis Wilson, who recorded a song penned by Charlie, who was an occasional member of the entourage of Mama Cass, who was listed as a defense witness for Charlie's trial (but never called), as was her Mamas and the Papas band-mate John Phillips, who was close to Polanski, Tate, Melcher, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Cass Elliot, and film producer Robert Evans, who was working with - and very likely contracted the execution killing of - Roy Radin, whose assistant was Michael DeVinko aka Mickie DeVinko aka Mickie Deans, who married - just a few months before her untimely death - Wizard of Oz star Judy Garland, who as a teen was flooded with phone messages and telegrams by admirer Oscar Levant, whose dead body was found by Candace Bergen, who - as a photojournalist for Life magazine - covered the preempted presidential campaign of Robert Kennedy, who was romantically linked to Marilyn Monroe, who was also linked to Anton LaVey, who appeared in Kenneth Anger's Invocation of My Demon Brother (released in August of 1969) along with Bobby Beausoleil, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, who was a guest at the 1968 London wedding of Sharon Tate to Roman Polanski, who - during a nude photo shoot - molested a thirteen-year-old girl at the home of Jack Nicholson, who was a friend of Cass Elliot, as were Robert Evans and Manson victims Jay Sebring, Voytek Frykowski and Abigail Folger, who provided funding for the Himalayan Academy, which Kenneth Anger helped form with Timothy Leary, who was at the side of the stage at the 1969 Altamont concert where - while the Rolling Stones played the Process Church-inspired Sympathy for the Devil* - a fan was killed on film by the Hell's Angels, who had been romanticized and transformed into anti-establishment heroes in the film Scorpio Rising by Kenneth Anger and the book Hell's Angels by Hunter S. Thompson, both of whom have been accused of making snuff films** for private collectors, which was also a favorite pastime of Charlie Manson, one of whose underage recruits was Didi Lansbury, who had written permission to travel with Charlie from her mother, Angela Lansbury, who starred as the control agent in The Manchurian Candidate, which was based on the novel of the same name by Richard Condon, who once served as a publicist for Walt Disney, who once owned the home where the Manson Family slaughtered Leno LaBianca and wife Rosemary, who was involved in the trafficking of drugs, as were many of those in this twisted saga, including Charles Manson, victims Voytek Frykowski and Abigail Folger, John Phillips and Kenneth Anger, who was a huge fan of the dark and violent imagery of the Rosicrucian-inspired, L. Frank Baum-penned Oz books, which inspired the band The Magick Powerhouse of Oz, which was led by Bobby Beausoleil, who was also at one time in the band Love with Arthur Lee, four of whose members later turned up dead or missing and presumed dead, as did Charlene Caffritz, Cass Elliot (who allegedly choked on a sandwich in 1974), Dennis Wilson (who allegedly drowned on December 28, 1983), and Gram Parsons, whose corpse was stolen and burned at Joshua Tree on the autumnal equinox of 1973 by his band's road manager, Phil Kaufman, who was a good friend from prison of Charlie Manson, who met (at Cass Elliot's house) and received money from victim Abigail Folger, who also funded Kenneth Anger, who at various times lived with both Jimmy Page (who purchased Crowley's home and many of his artifacts) and Keith Richards & Anita Pallenberg, whose home - in 1979 - yielded the body of a teenager who had been shot to death, as was John Lennon the next year by Mark David Chapman, who shortly before doing so met with - and offered a gift of live bullets to - Kenneth Anger, whose films were cited as a major influence by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, who was implicated by witnesses in the Halloween 1981 execution killing of New York photographer Ronald Sisman (a close associate of Roy Radin), who was reportedly in possession of a snuff film of one of the Son of Sam murders, which were allegedly committed by David Berkowitz, who from prison accurately described the Sisman killing before it happened and who took the fall for the Son of Sam murders to cover up the involvement of others, including possibly Roy Radin and wealthy art dealer Andrew Crispo, who admitted being present at the site of a ritual murder which was committed by a man named Bernard LeGeros, who was the son of a State Department official, as was Pic Dawson, who was a regular member of the entourage of Cass Elliot, as was a one-time bodyguard of publisher Larry Flynt named Bill Mentzer, who was convicted of killing Radin and who was suspected of involvement in numerous other contract murders, including some of those attributed to David Berkowitz, who was 'examined' by psychiatrist/hypnotist Daniel Schwartz, as was Mark David Chapman, who was obsessed with the film The Wizard of Oz and the book The Catcher in the Rye, which was written by reclusive author J.D. Salinger, who served in the OSS with Henry Kissinger, who was a close adviser to Gerald Ford, who once met and shook hands with Mark David Chapman, who was 'examined' by psychiatrist/hypnotist Bernard Diamond, who also 'examined' Sirhan Sirhan, who had connections to the Process Church, as did many of those ensnared in this sordid web, including Kenneth Anger, John Phillips, Roy Radin, David Berkowitz and Charlie Manson, who attended a New Year's Eve party at the home of John Phillips, who wrote the siren song of the 'Summer of Love,' bringing thousands of hippies and flower children streaming into San Francisco and into the hands of such figures as Louis "Dr. Jolly" West, Anton LaVey, Charlie Manson, Bobby Beausoleil, Timothy Leary and Kenneth Anger, who - just three days after the suspicious death of Rolling Stone Brian Jones - filmed the Hell's Angels stomping the crowd at a 1969 Stones concert in London, just five months before they did the very same thing to the crowd at Altamont, which was organized by San Francisco attorney Melvin Belli, who consulted with F. Lee Bailey whilst the latter was busily railroading Albert DeSalvo and later consulted with Richard "The Night Stalker" Ramirez, who was offered an honorary membership in the Church of Satan by Anton LaVey's daughter Zeena, who along with boyfriend Nickolas Schreck staged an event on 8-8-88 celebrating the slaughter of the victims of the Manson Family, who some researchers believe were involved in the murders attributed to the "Zodiac," who called and sent correspondence to Melvin Belli, whose clients included the widow of Hermann Goering and Jack Ruby, who assassinated Lee Harvey Oswald, the purported assassin of John Kennedy, whose brother Robert was romantically linked to Jayne Mansfield, as was Anton LaVey, who served as Roman Polanski's technical director on the 1968 film Rosemary's Baby, which was set in New York's Dakota Apartments, where John Lennon was gunned down by Mark David Chapman, who shared a fixation on The Catcher in the Rye with failed assassin John Hinckley, Jr., who stalked actress Jodie Foster, who is working on a film biography of Leni Riefenstahl, who was met by - and admired by - fellow filmmaker Kenneth Anger, who laced his film Scorpio Rising with Nazi imagery, including the prominent use of swastikas, not unlike the one carved into the forehead of Charlie Manson, who - at the Cielo Drive home of Polanski and Tate - had a chance meeting with Nancy Sinatra, the daughter of Frank Sinatra, who was married to actress Mia Farrow, who starred in the Polanski-directed Rosemary's Baby, which was produced by Robert Evans, a friend of Henry Kissinger, who was the righthand man of President Richard Nixon, whose election was ensured by the assassination of Robert Kennedy by Sirhan Sirhan, who was yet another client of Melvin Belli, as were the Hell's Angels and Nazi-collaborator Errol Flynn, who made two films with Ronald Reagan, who was an occasional visitor to the childhood home of Candace Bergen, who - as a photojournalist - chronicled the short-lived administration of Gerald Ford, who married one of his friend Harry Conover's 'Covergirls,' who later opened the Betty Ford Center, where various celebrities in and out of this web routinely check in for tune-ups."

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 05:47 AM (9razJ)

158 *rolls a D20 to disbelieve*

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 05:47 AM (cfNRa)

159 145 The hate crime "epidemic" is a classic moral panic - like the satanic ritual abuse of children back in the 1980s. Posted by: PJ at April 30, 2017 10:37 Never forget that reporters are not only stupid and agenda driven, they're deeply lazy.

Posted by: Northernlurker at April 30, 2017 05:49 AM (nBr1j)

160 -Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 10:47 AM (9razJ) Dude. A link would have done.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:49 AM (6gk0M)

161 Haole Frak a wall of text being massacred by Italicans...

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 05:49 AM (cfNRa)

162 I'd like to buy a carriage return or twenty.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum [i] at April 30, 2017 05:50 AM (HTdUD)

163 Off to a comic book show down by the airport. That counts as books, right?

Posted by: josephistan at April 30, 2017 05:50 AM (ANIFC)

164 If you played D&D, you "believed in the occult". You were more likely to sacrifice cats to Mordenkanien because reasons.

And here I thought the D&D types were just pervs, going on about their "magic missiles" and all.

Posted by: Blanco Basura at April 30, 2017 05:50 AM (IcT7t)

165 Patrick from Ohio, the trope that Earth is the sump of Humanity isn't exactly a new thing if you are trying to get me to read The Expanse.

A lot of it isn't very original but the alien keeps getting weirder.
I'm liking the books and the show more as it goes.  Not buy the DVDs more but rewatch/reread a few times more.

Posted by: DaveA[/i][/b][/s] at April 30, 2017 05:51 AM (FhXTo)

166 "And here I thought the DD types were just pervs, going on about their "magic missiles" and all." -Posted by: Blanco Basura at April 30, 2017 10:50 AM (IcT7t) You don't even want to know about my Wand of Wonder. I'll spare you.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:52 AM (6gk0M)

167 I love the book cake! I'm not good at cakes, they turn out lopsided or fall apart. Cookies are my thing, and several years ago I was asked to make some for our library's grand opening. The theme I went with was children's books. Put together a list of a hundred book titles to write on the cookies, and made character cookies from about a dozen of them. Here's a link to the library's photo stream. There are 11 pictures, but you have to click through a couple of pages where Flickr puts an ad telling you they're ad-free. http://tinyurl.com/mvexw8k

Posted by: NavyMom at April 30, 2017 05:52 AM (Oelm8)

168 I mentioned the 1969 Encyclopaedia Britannica. (Yes, that's how they spell it.) (Actually, it's that combination ae letter that only The Political Hat knows how to make here.) Anyhoo, it was the 200th anniversary edition, and came with a facsimile reproduction of the original three-volume edition published from 1769-1771. That set is fascinating. They set about to collect all of human knowledge available at that time. There were articles about the sciences (the telescope had been invented but the planet Uranus had not yet been discovered), and industrial processes like ropemaking (a vital industry in the Age of Sail). The timing was remarkable, too. Those books represent the absolute zenith of human knowledge and civilization on the very brink of the Industrial Revolution. It's as if we had books describing the technology of hunter-gatherers just before the first agricultural crops were planted. I checked Abebooks, and the three-volume facsimile set is available for about $50. It's a steal at that price.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 05:53 AM (sdi6R)

169
Second revision of Amazon Storyteller UK short story submission is in the hands of test readers. Still no idea of what the title will be. And still working on cover art.
---

Anna Puma--- have you thought about writing the ultimate liberal wet dream short story? I've been toying with the idea for a while, and thought that might be a fun project for the horde-- figure out all the SJW elements that thrill liberals, and somehow craft them into a story that they cannot refuse without being horribly, horribly racist.

Posted by: shibumi at April 30, 2017 05:54 AM (8zWAk)

170 You don't even want to know about my Wand of Wonder. I'll spare you.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) (T) at April 30, 2017 10:52 AM (6gk0M)


Let me tell you the story of my Magic Chakra.

It has a happy ending.

Posted by: Al Gore at April 30, 2017 05:54 AM (CWrAB)

171 Way OT:

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/04/30/
sandhill-cranes-lead-gator-across-florida-golf-course.html

Prehistoric monsters trying to eat you is a perfectly good reason to fly back and forth from Florida to Ontario (mosquitoes) and stop over in Indiana.

Posted by: DaveA[/i][/b][/s] at April 30, 2017 05:55 AM (FhXTo)

172 I thought of that, but it's one of the most amazing paragraphs, ever. The author died of an extremely fast acting cancer, fwiw, at a fairly young age.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 05:56 AM (9razJ)

173 Posted by: NavyMom at April 30, 2017 10:52 AM (Oelm ........................... Nice! I wouldn't have the patience to go into that kind of detail.

Posted by: Molly k. at April 30, 2017 05:58 AM (9H4KE)

174 There are 11 pictures, but you have to click through a couple of pages where Flickr puts an ad telling you they're ad-free.
http://tinyurl.com/mvexw8k

Posted by: NavyMom at April 30, 2017 10:52 AM (Oelm


Thank you, NavyMom, those cookies look great. I may feature them in next week's book thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 05:58 AM (CWrAB)

175 She divorced George and married the glass guy. So George has to read his books in a room illuminated by the artwork of the guy who cuckolded him. Posted by: OrcPimp at April 30, 2017 09:42 AM (WOMkd) I doubt that he spends any time there. That room is in a part of the building used by staff, and is not part of his private living quarters.

Posted by: HTL at April 30, 2017 05:59 AM (qzE/R)

176 Go to Hell, Al. Do not pass "Go". Do not collect Carbon Credits.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 05:59 AM (6gk0M)

177 Shibumi, your main character would have to be a wheelchair bound hermaphrodite that is part Chinese, Nigerian, Libyan, and Inuit. Who also self-identifies sexually and gender wise as a Waste Paper Basket. And has as a Trigger anyone who says "Hello" to them.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 05:59 AM (cfNRa)

178 Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 10:59 AM (cfNRa)

I'd laugh at this, but laughing is considered regressive and exploitative.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:00 AM (CWrAB)

179 dang it, off creepy VP sock.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:01 AM (CWrAB)

180 My son's wedding cake was a stack of books. Beautiful. Their gifts to guests were also books--tables of used ones with all the old good names--Allen Drury, John O'Hara, Larry McMurtry, Agatha Christie, Louis L'Amour. They spent a year collecting them. It was fun to see fancypants wedding guests from both coasts mulling over which to choose, sneaking glances of what others liked.

Posted by: Wenda (sic) at April 30, 2017 06:02 AM (Kr0FZ)

181 looks like we got a barrelfull of taters.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at April 30, 2017 06:02 AM (6FqZa)

182 ..."There are 11 pictures, but you have to click through a couple of pages where Flickr puts an ad telling you they're ad-free. http://tinyurl.com/mvexw8k" -Posted by: NavyMom at April 30, 2017 10:52 AM (Oelm Those were Awesome!

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:03 AM (6gk0M)

183 Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 10:47 AM (9razJ) *standing ovation*

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 06:03 AM (sdi6R)

184 That room is in a part of the building used by staff, Yes, that it was.

Posted by: paolo the glass guy at April 30, 2017 06:03 AM (6FqZa)

185 Oregon Muse, I also wanted to comment that though I'm rarely around on Saturday and Sunday for the Chess and Book threads, I always open them and read them, plus I do the chess problems (mostly).
 
Thanks for both threads.

Posted by: GnuBreed [/i] [/b] at April 30, 2017 06:04 AM (wTwJ2)

186 Shibumi, your main character would have to be a wheelchair bound hermaphrodite that is part Chinese, Nigerian, Libyan, and Inuit. Who also self-identifies sexually and gender wise as a Waste Paper Basket. And has as a Trigger anyone who says "Hello" to them.
---

LOL. It's written itself already!

I was thinking more "gay male black  Muslim" in the middle of a sex change who "fights against racist conservatives" and becomes so popular that he/she/it gets his/her/whatever own tv show with Oprah.

But I think we can add some triggers in there, and I'm open to a partial Inuit background....or maybe a refugee. They probably need to be a refugee from Russia. So a communist gay black male Muslim.

Or maybe Cuba. That might work too.

Posted by: shibumi at April 30, 2017 06:04 AM (8zWAk)

187 "Without further ado, we begin this journey... Uh? Hello?

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at April 30, 2017 06:05 AM (7oUUT)

188 You can't finish off Encyclopaediae without mention of Denis Diderot "and his ilk." The Philosophe weren't philosophers, really (and NEITHER WAS Robert Pirsig), but every swinging appendage of them thought he could write a compendium of all human knowledge, solo.

You can't understand 18th cent France without the Encyclopaedists, and their outlook, plus their now-annoying and widely-copied quirk of loading definition and description with a whole lot of Big World emoting. Both ventures had a wide effect on what it meant to be schmaht. Then and now.  

Posted by: Stringer Davis[/i][/b] at April 30, 2017 06:07 AM (H5rtT)

189 I haven't been able to comment on weekend threads for quite awhile. Most of you thank God for that. You are correct and I'll bite my tongue in favor of Correct Opinions.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:07 AM (6gk0M)

190 Shibumi, both characters get on a national talk show.  Think Ellen DeGenerate meets The Spew. And the panel of hosts are forced to decide who has the best Victim Card to play.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 06:08 AM (cfNRa)

191 Slap: I was confused because your original post looked sincere rather than sarcastic.

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 30, 2017 06:09 AM (gIyP7)

192 I haven't been able to comment on weekend threads for quite awhile. Most of you thank God for that. You are correct and I'll bite my tongue in favor of Correct Opinions. Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) (T) at April 30, 2017 11:07 AM (6gk0M) ======== Really? I thought I saw you briefly last night.....

Posted by: Uber Lyft Driver at April 30, 2017 06:10 AM (Hj4t4)

193 162 I'd like to buy a carriage return or twenty. Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at April 30, 2017 10:50 AM (HTdUD) You don't use those in a single sentence.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 06:10 AM (sdi6R)

194 "Slap: I was confused because your original post looked sincere rather than sarcastic." -Posted by: Trimegistus at April 30, 2017 11:09 AM (gIyP7) *HAH!* My Apologies!

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:11 AM (6gk0M)

195 Orwell covered fake hate crimes in "1984", though it was directly government orchestrated, not just snowflakes wanting attention and verification.  Or the fake action doesn't even have to happen, it is just written into existence.

The fake crime of CO2 pollution is a variation on committing an actual hoax.  It makes production evil, driving a car is evil, the West is evil.  It is a hoax, but instead of doing fake polluting, they make honest success a crime, against the planet and humanity.  White Christian Male American ... guilty for life on all counts.  How convenient for the cultural Marxist losers.

Redefining good as evil has been the more successful hoaxing to condemn the deplorables.  It is the basis for all the fake phobias (Islamophobic, homophobic, "science-phobic", etc).  But to actually commit the PC crime and use it as (false) evidence is prone to backfiring and discrediting the SJW narrative.  But they are failing and desperate.

Posted by: illiniwek at April 30, 2017 06:12 AM (TmCOq)

196 Posted by: GnuBreed at April 30, 2017 11:04 AM (wTwJ2)

I was wondering why I havn't seen you on the threads much.

Glad you're still around.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:12 AM (CWrAB)

197 So the panel after much hemming and hawing makes the call on who has the Best Victim call due to the demands of their audience. And immediately after the announcement one half of the audience starts attacking the other half while Ellen and Whoopi go MMA on each other.

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 06:14 AM (cfNRa)

198 Shibumi, both characters get on a national talk show. Think Ellen DeGenerate meets The Spew. And the panel of hosts are forced to decide who has the best Victim Card to play.
--

They end up on a game show, somewhat like American Idol. But termed something like "The Most Deserving," and win money donated by prominent liberals (hahahahaha). They  do an investigation on the finalists, and in a SHOCKING bit, they find out that when one of them was a  small child in school, they wrote/ drew something that was politically unacceptable. So.. they lose, and the other goes onto  International Fame as a UN Ambassador for "Causes."

Posted by: shibumi at April 30, 2017 06:14 AM (8zWAk)

199 Oh great Tater, so now the Wizard of Oz has some nefarious occult connection?

Posted by: Secret Square at April 30, 2017 06:15 AM (9WuX0)

200 "Really? I thought I saw you briefly last night..." -Posted by: Uber Lyft Driver at April 30, 2017 11:10 AM (Hj4t4) *HAH!* Briefly? I was on my ass ALL DAY, yesterday. Find me the last post I made on a weekend, though. Buzzion would be your source for that... lol.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:15 AM (6gk0M)

201 Or maybe Cuba. That might work too.

Posted by: shibumi at April 30, 2017 11:04 AM (8zWAk)


Not Cuba. Won't work. Go to the Cuban areas of Miami wearing a Che T-shirt and you'll see why.

Actually, it might work if the Cuban refugee is a gangster. Because according to SJW mythology, most of the people who fled Castro's island paradise were organized gangsters affiliated with the Batista regime. I'm not making this up.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:16 AM (CWrAB)

202 Anyone read any Richard Condon, author of The Manchurian Candidate and Prizzi's Honor. I'm curious if he's good

Posted by: Ignoramus at April 30, 2017 06:17 AM (bQxkN)

203 Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) (T) at April 30, 2017 11:15 AM (6gk0M)

You're certainly chatty this morning. Coffee much? 

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:17 AM (CWrAB)

204 Cuban gangsters?

Oh you mean the Marielitos that Carter let in?

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 06:17 AM (cfNRa)

205 OT: WZ nominates this as the silliest moment of the climate march. Fighting fossil fuels. http://tinyurl.com/k32jq4l

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Doctor of Thinkology at April 30, 2017 06:19 AM (Nwg0u)

206 Oh you mean the Marielitos that Carter let in?

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 11:17 AM (cfNRa)


Shush, you.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:19 AM (CWrAB)

207 You don't use those in a single sentence. Posted by: rickl Omg, you're correct. There must be one hundred comma's in there. Try to read that one sentence and a person could become commatose.

Posted by: E Depluribus Unum at April 30, 2017 06:20 AM (HTdUD)

208 Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 10:58 AM (CWrAB) That would be quite an honor, Oregon Muse! I always look forward to the book thread. Every week I find something to add to my Amazon wish list. And thanks to everyone for the kind words! This was my first big order, and I agonized over every cookie - to the point that I just about worried myself sick. But it all turned out ok. Love the library - they have a great children's section and children's programs. We're so lucky to have such a nice library in our small town.

Posted by: NavyMom at April 30, 2017 06:20 AM (Oelm8)

209 I'm thinking of deleting that TL;DR wall of text at  #157. What an eyesore. Comment Tater, if you could provide me a link to where you got the text from, I could swap it out.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:21 AM (CWrAB)

210 "You're certainly chatty this morning. Coffee much?" -Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 11:17 AM (CWrAB) I WISH! I luuurve coffee. I can't drink it anymore because of stupid panic-attacks. I thought I had "outgrown" them, but they are exacerbated by my favorite breakfast beverage.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:22 AM (6gk0M)

211 209 I'm thinking of deleting that TL;DR wall of text at #157. What an eyesore. Comment Tater, if you could provide me a link to where you got the text from, I could swap it out. Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 11:21 AM (CWrAB) Don't. It's awesome. I Read The Whole Thing. (TM)

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 06:23 AM (sdi6R)

212
Actually, it might work if the Cuban refugee is a gangster. Because according to SJW mythology, most of the people who fled Castro's island paradise were organized gangsters affiliated with the Batista regime. I'm not making this up.
--

This is good. Can be a gay Cuban Muslim gangster affiliated with ISIS who is getting a sex change?

Are there Muslims in Cuba? Probably doesn't matter. You know, "fiction."

Posted by: shibumi at April 30, 2017 06:25 AM (8zWAk)

213 Don't. It's awesome.

I Read The Whole Thing. (TM)
Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 11:23 AM (sdi6R)


Actually, now that I've actually read a few lines of it, I agree. The fact that it's a wall of text is part of the joke.

I'll allow it.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:25 AM (CWrAB)

214 OM, Thanks for those old timey skills and survival links. Barring a real catastrophe my hardcore camping days are done but I still enjoy learning about this stuff.

Posted by: JTB at April 30, 2017 06:26 AM (V+03K)

215 Listened to Nick Cole's Apocalypse Wierd: The Red King, first in a zombie apocalypse series set in L.A. Shows influences including The Stand and Lucifer's Hammer, enjoyed it a lot. Relatively short, finished it in a day, also is free on Kindle.

Posted by: waelse1 at April 30, 2017 06:29 AM (eP/fq)

216 It's ONE SENTENCE.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 06:29 AM (sdi6R)

217 "Shush? No one tells Scarface 'shush!' Say hello to my little friend!"


Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 06:31 AM (cfNRa)

218 My opinion will not change. While I may take the position of our COBs and I would not eradicate that Wall of Text as an Executive? As a "reader", I wanted nothing to do with it. I "skipped it", and perhaps that was the joke.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:31 AM (6gk0M)

219 "It's ONE SENTENCE." -Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 11:29 AM (sdi6R) ...Said Fort Leavenworth.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:33 AM (6gk0M)

220 As a "reader", I wanted nothing to do with it.
I "skipped it", and perhaps that was the joke.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) (T) at April 30, 2017 11:31 AM (6gk0M)


I agreed with rickl that it should stay put. Its unsightly appearance is part of the joke.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:33 AM (CWrAB)

221 I Read The Whole Thing. (TM) - Sooooo Mama Cass was Satan?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Doctor of Thinkology at April 30, 2017 06:35 AM (Nwg0u)

222 I remember reading a Weirddave joke that was a wall of text. It was more than one sentence, though. That's an hour of my life I'll never get back. Wouldn't trade it for the world, though.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 06:35 AM (sdi6R)

223 I thought about a link, but nobody would read it. It's been expunged from Mr. Mcgowan's webpage afaik, he died a couple years ago. Nobody would have read it. An excerpt doesn't have the full effect. My apologies, but it did make the point, I think. There are some seriously wacky people out there! As it turns out, the good news is I haven't been paranoid my whole life. The bad news is, most of my worst fears are coming true. Something like that.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 06:35 AM (9razJ)

224 "I agreed with rickl that it should stay put. Its unsightly appearance is part of the joke." -Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 11:33 AM (CWrAB) That's what I thought. I "missed-out" on the joke. -The Aristocrats!

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:36 AM (6gk0M)

225 Common Tater, could we have a link as well? Where is this found? Is this just an excerpt--is there more? Not that I could read much of it at a time, but it's fascinating in little bits.

Posted by: April at April 30, 2017 06:37 AM (e8PP1)

226 My daughter and I are both authors! We deserve respect! We're not dumb - not like people say! hic

Posted by: Hillary 2020! at April 30, 2017 06:40 AM (bc2Lc)

227 Skandia Recluse, "Wellington's Men" sounds like 57 flavors of awesome. It is now percolating into my kindle.

Posted by: naturalfake at April 30, 2017 06:40 AM (9q7Dl)

228 "It's ONE SENTENCE." - Joke from The Sparrow: a support group for people sho talk too much, On and On Anon.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Doctor of Thinkology at April 30, 2017 06:40 AM (Nwg0u)

229 "Sooo Mama Cass was Satan?" Either her or maybe Judy Garland, or maybe Henry Kissinger. Or maybe even Sammy Davis Jr.

Posted by: Secret Square at April 30, 2017 06:41 AM (9WuX0)

230 Well the thunder is getting more pronounced and the lights have flickered once, so shutting system down.

Excerpt from short story submission just to amuse and tantalize:

She still remembers the day the CIA had snared her after
one job. Chad had been the officer to interview her and even now
Tanya is not sure if he was just toying with her when he asked
what her job was. But she was far more cocky then than now and
had answered him that she was a High-Value Asset Retrieval
Expert. Chad had quirked an eyebrow, scribbled something down,
and then had calmly said, "a cat-burglar."

Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 06:42 AM (cfNRa)

231 i'm glad you referred to the muldoon/outhouse post from a few weeks ago, because i've redrafted my limerick in honor of his dignified presence and hoped to have a chance to bring it to his attention: there's a poetical lad named muldoon who reads in a curious room if it's limericks ye need he's the man to see just knock on the door with the moon!

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at April 30, 2017 06:44 AM (WTSFk)

232 That Stream of Connection ties to William Joseph Bryan, Jr., who was in charge of brainwashing for CIA including Project MK Ultra, and who hypnotized Sirhan Sirhan to kill Bobby Kennedy. I could tell you more, but then I'd have to kill you

Posted by: Ignoramus at April 30, 2017 06:46 AM (bQxkN)

233 Notice I didn't call for "The Barrel", as many Rookies exclaim. I simply wondered and the answer was provided by calmer minds than mine. My mind is made of bubble-gum and cheddar cheese. It is difficult to reconcile the both of them. I'll try to remain on a level playing-field, but I'm surrounded by brilliance. I'm intimidated by people who I may need to kill for their buried gold and survival packs.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:46 AM (6gk0M)

234 225 Common Tater, could we have a link as well? Where is this found? Is this just an excerpt--is there more? Not that I could read much of it at a time, but it's fascinating in little bits. ------- It was on a website written by Dave McGowan, mainly about Laurel Canyon, in California from the 30s through the 60s When he published his book, all the links on the page disappeared. I had saved that paragraph. Sorry, ha ha. I think it's called "The strange but mostly true story of Laurel Canyon" or somesuch. It has a lot of interesting stories about all the big musical acts of the 1960s, and all the bizarre associations.

Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 06:50 AM (9razJ)

235 I don't want to kill any of you. Let's hope that it doesn't come to that.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 06:53 AM (6gk0M)

236 btw: thank you for the links to the hoax hate crime sites. i was hoping and figured there must be someone keeping track. i think i even brought it up on these pages some time ago. fascinating reading.someone should bring it to tucker carlson attention for wider dissemination.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at April 30, 2017 06:53 AM (WTSFk)

237 ... it seems to me a segment on fake hate crimes would be right up carlson's alley.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at April 30, 2017 06:54 AM (WTSFk)

238 Skandia Recluse, "Wellington's Men" sounds like 57 flavors of awesome. It is now percolating into my kindle. Posted by: naturalfake at April 30, 2017 11:40 AM (9q7Dl) It is a bit dry to read, and gruesome enough you might need to set it aside for a time and decompress. Ties in well with Mauldin in the link above.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at April 30, 2017 06:54 AM (Y8Ndm)

239 234 It was on a website written by Dave McGowan, mainly about Laurel Canyon, in California from the 30s through the 60s When he published his book, all the links on the page disappeared. I had saved that paragraph. Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 11:50 AM (9razJ) I, for one, am glad you did. That's a hell of a lot of food for thought. So the internet isn't forever, as we've been told?

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 06:55 AM (sdi6R)

240 I love the photo of Lucas's library, especially the lighting. Soft, warm, no shadows. And then some A-hold had to set off a flash to photograph it. (See the sharp shadows of the chair legs? The bright highlight on the spiral staircase?) What the hell was he thinking? Did he never hear of a tripod? What a jerk.

Posted by: Socratease at April 30, 2017 06:56 AM (2GbWn)

241 If you enjoyed "39 Steps," the sequel "Greenmantle" is even better IMO. Unfortunately it has never been adapted into film. Hitchcock was once planning to make one with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, but it never got off the ground. A pity, because it could have been one of the all-time classics. Posted by: Biggs Darklighter at April 30, 2017 10:02 AM (60SwY) Quite topical, too, in the way islam is involved in the story. John Buchan was a friend and neighbor of T.E. Lawrence.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at April 30, 2017 06:57 AM (0deF2)

242 So the internet isn't forever, as we've been told?

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 11:55 AM (sdi6R)


Archive.org is our friend.

Posted by: OregonMuse, deplorable since 2004 at April 30, 2017 06:57 AM (CWrAB)

243 195 Orwell covered fake hate crimes in "1984", though it was directly government orchestrated, not just snowflakes wanting attention and verification. ... Redefining good as evil has been the more successful hoaxing to condemn the deplorables. It is the basis for all the fake phobias (Islamophobic, homophobic, "science-phobic", etc). But to actually commit the PC crime and use it as (false) evidence is prone to backfiring and discrediting the SJW narrative. But they are failing and desperate. Posted by: illiniwek at April 30, 2017 11:12 AM (TmCOq) The "Phobia" Fake is this: a real phobia is an unreasonable fear based on nothing--not a thoughtful objection based on factual and moral grounds. The Wolf Who Cried Boy-Press loves hoaxcrime--the lie is pre-written without their fingerprints. When it tests positive for fecal matter, they can retract on Page 5741-D, if at all. Meanwhile, they can be heroes for Giving Voice to the Voiceless(tm), instead of investigating the facts. FACT: Woodward & Bernstein becomes Failing & Desperate.

Posted by: The Gipper Lives at April 30, 2017 06:58 AM (Ndje9)

244 So the internet isn't forever, as we've been told? Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 11:55 AM (sdi6R) It can be surprisingly transient. Archive.org keeps a lot of things, but not everything. And in some cases (e.g. John Dies At The End, a bizarre and hilarious story that used to be freely available), the content owner can ask archive.org to remove their content.

Posted by: hogmartin at April 30, 2017 06:58 AM (8nWyX)

245 Anyone read any Richard Condon, author of The Manchurian Candidate and Prizzi's Honor. I'm curious if he's good Posted by: Ignoramus at April 30, 2017 11:17 AM (bQxkN) Condon's a good writer. He tends to be very cynical and his dealio is undermining 50s-60s American tropes with "High-concept" plots in his stories. That's why his better novels were made into movies - easy one sentence description of story. Good at ratcheting up tension and horror as the full extent of plots revealed. Read "Winter Kills" for a fun novel that shows what Condon is all about.

Posted by: naturalfake at April 30, 2017 06:59 AM (9q7Dl)

246 "It can be surprisingly transient." Someday the NSA will become the modern Library of Alexandria

Posted by: Ignoramus at April 30, 2017 07:01 AM (bQxkN)

247 167 I love the book cake! I'm not good at cakes, they turn out lopsided or fall apart. Cookies are my thing, and several years ago I was asked to make some for our library's grand opening. The theme I went with was children's books. Put together a list of a hundred book titles to write on the cookies, and made character cookies from about a dozen of them. Here's a link to the library's photo stream. There are 11 pictures, but you have to click through a couple of pages where Flickr puts an ad telling you they're ad-free. http://tinyurl.com/mvexw8k Posted by: NavyMom at April 30, 2017 10:52 AM (Oelm Navy Mom, you are awesome!!! What a phenomenal job!

Posted by: Gem at April 30, 2017 07:01 AM (uaHyk)

248 This week I took a break from the intrigue of the Catholic Church in Windswept House in favor of Joe R. Lansdale's latest, Blood and Lemonade. B&L is not a novel but a series of short stories featuring Hap and Leonard. Highly recommended if you're a fan of this series. I'm always fascinated by Lansdale's abject loathing for conservatives (esp. Reagan) while he writes about his childhood in '50s/'60s Texas, and was pure rugged individualism and grit for survival. SMH

Posted by: SandyCheeks at April 30, 2017 07:02 AM (joFoi)

249 Six Richard Hannay novels by John Buchan are available for free for the Kindle on Amazon.

Posted by: Zoltan at April 30, 2017 07:03 AM (er9fQ)

250 Giada is deep frying things from Italy. With cleavage showing like it was important.

Posted by: Slapweasel, (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i] [/b] [/u] [/s] at April 30, 2017 07:03 AM (6gk0M)

251 FYI, nood.

Posted by: Bob the Bilderberg at April 30, 2017 07:03 AM (7oUUT)

252 Ordered Winter Kills. Thanks

Posted by: Ignoramus at April 30, 2017 07:05 AM (bQxkN)

253 >>>Lucas spent his money well on that library. I could retreat there for years and be totally content I think.<<<

What if every one of those books was a new adventure of Jar Jar Binks?

Posted by: Fritz at April 30, 2017 07:11 AM (TNQMS)

254 New addition to my reading.  ON 4/27 JJ Sefton Morning Report linked to an American Thinker article called "First They Came For the Nazis" http://tinyurl.com/khhtf3q    

The article mentions a Russian History book by Orlando Figes, "A Peoples Tragedy".  Figes' says that Lenin was not the defining factor of the Red Terror.  First, there were years of marches, riots, terrorism and repression, throughout the cities and countryside.  All decentralized.  And then came Lenin and the Bolsheviks, almost bloodlessly.  Followed, of course, by Red Terror .

I am looking forward to reading it.  Like almost all Russian History books it is lengthy.  The details should be interesting.  Thanks JJ.


Posted by: gracepc at April 30, 2017 07:15 AM (OU4q6)

255 Re lives of soldiers: I read "Legionary: The Roman Soldier's (Unofficial) Manuel" by Philip Matyszak several years ago. Fun little book about the the the life of a typical legionary round about 100 A.D. Lots of illustrations. As I said, easy fun read.

Posted by: Tuna at April 30, 2017 07:30 AM (jm1YL)

256 "The Saddest Bookworm" LOL Is this you when you finish a good book? http://bit.ly/2qsYCYa

Posted by: SandyCheeks at April 30, 2017 07:38 AM (joFoi)

257 I've finished my entry for the Amazon UK Storyteller contest and it's now being beta'd. Now I have to slap a cover on it- always the hardest part for me- put in any final edits, and it's ready to go.

Posted by: right wing yankee at April 30, 2017 09:09 AM (26lkV)

Hope you see this.  Best of luck.


Posted by: gracepc at April 30, 2017 07:46 AM (OU4q6)

258 Posted by: Anna Puma at April 30, 2017 09:23 AM (BlqBq)

Just beginning to read the comments.  So, best of luck to you also.  And to all who have entered the contest.  Can you all win?  That would be my choice.

Posted by: gracepc at April 30, 2017 07:52 AM (OU4q6)

259 Only got to 151 so far, and after I swore a great oath that there will be no book orders today based on the Book Thread recos, I've already ordered three books! I have real things to do outside while the weather holds, but thanks OM for the Book Thread... and the damage to my budget!

Posted by: Hrothgar [/i][/u][/b][/s] at April 30, 2017 07:53 AM (gwPgz)

260 Ok I'm back! Just cut up a whole duck. Interesting. Right wing yankee, if you like Jane Austen, one of the ettes has done a Mansfield Park retelling. I'll put it up on my blog, tomorrow.

Posted by: @votermom @vm at April 30, 2017 08:03 AM (hMwEB)

261 Many, many thanks to the morons who recommended Charles McCarry's "Shelley's Heart" awhile ago. It's a great novel involving a presidential election stolen by computer fraud, a controversial Supreme Court appointment, a powerful politician who actually grabs women by p*ssy and Islamic terrorism. And it was written in 1995.

The only McCarry novel I'd read before was "Lucky Bastard," a hilarious thriller about a thinly disguised Bill Clinton being the illegitimate son of JFK and winding up being a Soviet tool overseen by a hard-core Commie Hillary en route to the White House.

Looks like I'll spend my summer hunting down McCarry's other books.
.

Posted by: Outside Adjitator at April 30, 2017 08:03 AM (hbvkG)

262 I've got a hardback of "he Chinatown Death Cloud Peril" on the shelf. I enjoyed his "The Astounding ...". Time to get it out for the to be read pile. Love the pulps.

Posted by: JTB at April 30, 2017 08:07 AM (V+03K)

263 Read The Family by Ed sanders if you want the background on Manson and the occult.

Posted by: Notsothoreau at April 30, 2017 08:11 AM (Lqy/e)

264 A sad article about books, from the New York City public school system -- http://nypost.com/2017/04/29/manhattan-school-trashes-all-its-textbooks/

Posted by: SuttonHoo at April 30, 2017 08:29 AM (ICdyE)

265 Looks like I'll spend my summer hunting down McCarry's other books.

Posted by: Outside Adjitator at April 30, 2017 01:03 PM (hbvkG)


I recommend reading his 10-book Paul Christopher series in order, starting with The Miernik Dossier. Shelley's Heart is #8, but it can be read out of order as a stand-alone.

Posted by: cool breeze at April 30, 2017 08:31 AM (TKf/P)

266 Thanks, Oregon Muse, for mentioning the $0.99 sale on The Hidden Truth. I'm looking forward to discussing it with the rest of the Moron Horde over at Goodreads.

Posted by: Hans G. Schantz at April 30, 2017 09:00 AM (0h1Dx)

267 Anyone read any Richard Condon, author of The Manchurian Candidate and Prizzi's Honor. I'm curious if he's good Posted by: Ignoramus at April 30, 2017 11:17 AM (bQxkN) Back in the day, I read almost everything he wrote and thought he was a pretty darn good teller of tales! I need to add him to my used book search list.

Posted by: Hrothgar [/i][/u][/b][/s] at April 30, 2017 09:05 AM (gwPgz)

268 I do that. Which is why I wouldn't want to own an expensive, flashy car. I'd have to spend all of my time taking care of it. Posted by: OregonMuse ---- *gazes out in the driveway at 22 year-old truck* It get washed when it rains.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at April 30, 2017 09:12 AM (ZO497)

269 The only McCarry novel I'd read before was "Lucky Bastard," a hilarious thriller about a thinly disguised Bill Clinton ... ------------ Crap. *slogs to used book site*

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at April 30, 2017 09:13 AM (ZO497)

270 I have placed comment 243 in my 'Wisdom of the AoSHQ' folder.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at April 30, 2017 09:21 AM (ZO497)

271 Re: 8 Does anyone look at pictures of nice houses/rooms like the library above, and say, 'That's gorgeous. I'd hate to be the one who has to keep it clean."

I can soitenly relate on this one.  Also seeing pictures of cozy nooks with beds in 'em.  All I can think is, that bed would be a bitch to make, so who needs more difficulty in making a bed.  I have enough trouble with making a bed in the first place, so no thank you!
I'm reading the last book in the series of the letters between Queen Victoria and her oldest daughter, Victoria, the Empress of Prussia.  There are 7 volumes, which begin with letters from 1858.  I had all but the last one (1886 - 1901), but finally found it a couple of weeks ago on Amazon.  It's the only one not edited by Robert  Fulton, and I miss his expertise.  I unhappily find that the wrong editor can cause disproportionate disappointment.

Posted by: Bookaday at April 30, 2017 09:22 AM (2qDS0)

272 264 holy crap is that real?

Posted by: @votermom @vm at April 30, 2017 09:29 AM (hMwEB)

273 Anyone ever read "Passing Through the Flame" by Norman Spinrad? It's about a rock band and a concert among other things. The long quote reminded me of it. And why isn't there a connection to Gloria Steinham, who admitted she worked for the CIA?

Posted by: Notsothoreau at April 30, 2017 09:50 AM (Lqy/e)

274 I guess I'm going to have to read "The Outsiders." They're making a big to-do about the book approaching its 50th anniversary. Stars from the movie are coming to town next weekend to visit places where they filmed its scenes. I remember seeing the book listed in a Scholastic Book Services handout when I was in middle school. It didn't sound appealing -- even then, I couldn't cotton to the idea that the school-ain't-cool-I-live-in-the-real-world impoverished shlub should get my loyalties automatically. My peers and I didn't stay out partying, and we went to church with our married parents. We studied. If our families had money, that's because our parents also had studied. But if my family had money, you couldn't tell it by how we lived. If that makes me sound like a snob, well, to hell with you. Still, the book must have something behind its longevity. So it goes on the list.

Posted by: Weak Geek at April 30, 2017 09:56 AM (AGr/f)

275 272 I haven't found any other article about it except in the New York Post, but I assume it's real. At least they're letting students take some books before they're trashed.

Posted by: SuttonHoo at April 30, 2017 10:04 AM (ICdyE)

276 @ 118: Comics? You bet. Start with Astro City. It's old-fashioned superheroes, but the stories usually center around the non-powered denizens. Example: Small-time thief learns true identity of famous hero. What does he do with this? And my favorite AC story is told by the head doorman of the city's ritziest hotel. All the stories are collected in trade paperbacks. You probably won't find them at B&N, but a comics shop should have them or will order them for you. Another that comes to mind is PS 238. It's a light-hearted look at the school for the kids of superheroes. "Making sure the next generation doesn't break this generation'so stuff." Great fun by an imaginative writer/artist. Something for an older kid? I like Ghosted, about a master thief recruited to form a team to steal a ghost. This is horror, and blood does spill. Let's wrap up with Criminal. Noir on paper. Several trade PBs available. Hope I wasn't too late to help.

Posted by: Weak Geek at April 30, 2017 11:02 AM (AGr/f)

277 I recommend "The Quartet" by Joseph J. Ellis. It's a condensed look at the years after the American Revolution, leading up to the ratification of the Constitution, with a focus on the four men (the quartet) who made it happen.

Posted by: CatchThirtyThr33 at April 30, 2017 11:43 AM (D2za3)

278 256 "The Saddest Bookworm" LOL Is this you when you finish a good book? http://bit.ly/2qsYCYa Posted by: SandyCheeks at April 30, 2017 12:38 PM (joFoi) OMG, that is hilarious.

Posted by: rickl at April 30, 2017 11:57 AM (sdi6R)

279 @274 Weak Geek, The Outsiders was one of my absolute favorite books! It was assigned reading when I was in 8th grade. I must have read it a half-dozen times over the following couple of years. Part of me wants to read it again, but another part is afraid I won't like it now and I don't want to lose that memory.

Posted by: NavyMom at April 30, 2017 12:11 PM (Oelm8)

280 A buddy and I were staying in Bangor, Wales. Outside the window we could see that there appeared to be a large Neolithic structure across the street. When we went to see it, we realized it was the stone table Aslan had been slain on. Apparently the BBC had built it for their (1960s??) version of The Lion, the Witch, & the Wardrobe. The townies liked it so much, they kept it. So if you're a Lewis fan and ever in Northern Wales, it's worth a quick stop for the photos. Ask anyone in town or on campus, they all know where it is.

Posted by: Rusty Shackleford at April 30, 2017 01:06 PM (PZyrx)

281 The Silver Chair is my favorite Narnia book too (and my daughter's as well). "Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was distorted beyond recognition; I hope the new crew gets back on track with this movie.

An indispensable book for understanding the Narnia books is Michael Ward's "Planet Narnia".

Posted by: civil truth at April 30, 2017 01:25 PM (t3LBb)

282 Posted by: Common Tater at April 30, 2017 10:47 AM (9razJ) Don't know who the author is, but must be related to Proust.

Posted by: waelse1 at April 30, 2017 01:43 PM (nQZse)

283 Regarding George Lucas' library, if I had his money, my library would reach to the sky. Reading The Lowells of Massachusetts: An American Family, it's by Nina Sankovitch who wrote Tolstoy and the Purple Chair, her quest to read a book a day for a year and was touching. This book is like a Dava Sobel or Mark Kurlansky book, very good at giving the details of the individual, but also the era. Great book of popular history from colonial to the 1920's. I learned a great deal with writing that engaged. Like Oregon Muse, I am too old for bad writing. Probably wouldn't have read Tom Clancy now.

Posted by: Joe Mack at April 30, 2017 04:23 PM (3hIZX)

284 Didn't want to hijack the thread earlier, but this appears to be a link to the book / article related to the wall of text post. Can't vouch for the web site. Hope this works:

http://tinyurl.com/ydporaw

Posted by: long time lurker at April 30, 2017 04:41 PM (2exZW)

285 118 Anyone read comics? My boys love illustrated stories; the older having read the entire illustrated Bible that they recently came out with. But I won't get him any comics because they seem to have been culturally appropriated by the daft and mentally ill. Any good suggestions by anyone more intimately familiar with the genre? I recommend: All Star Superman by Grant Morrison - Morrison weaves a tale that shows why Superman is the greatest ever. Captain America by Ed Brubaker - Cap with a spy twist and he dies but comes back ( hey it's comic books!). And my favorite: The New Frontier by Darwyn Cooke. A beautiful book that was fun. Although their is one part that celebrates pacifism during the Korean War by a main character - it can't beta the overall greatness if the book.

Posted by: Rgallegos at April 30, 2017 06:25 PM (59GQk)

286 Yes, The New Frontier is top-notch storytelling.

Posted by: Weak Geek at April 30, 2017 07:52 PM (AGr/f)

287 Re Post-Tech Survivalist Booklist, try 'Camping and Woodcraft' by Horace Kephart, originally published 1906. I used to have a 1921 edition, back when I was a Boy Sprout (long ago in a galaxy far away)  ...  book's gone who knows where.

But available as a 900 page pdf at:

http://scoutmastercg.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/campingwoodcraft.pdf

Want to know how to dress a deer, cook some venison and make leather from the skin?  All set out in the book.
Recommended.

Posted by: Dyspeptic Curmudgeon at May 01, 2017 10:00 AM (PcVc6)

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