June 30, 2015

Suggestions Box for the Next Book Club Thread
— Ace

I don't think I picked a great one last time, but I want to do this again.

People will want to read a political book. There are two such books I want to read, and which are endlessly recommended to me, but which I need a nudge to read (which the point of a bookclub, the nudge): Thomas Sowell's Vision of the Annointed and F.A. Hayek's Road to Serfdom.

One book I'd like a nudge to read is Dracula, which I was enjoying before I put it down for no good reason. I was surprised it was well written -- for some reason I expected it to be gothic trash. Maybe it is, but I liked the scenery-painting of Transylvania.

Other suggestions?

The only type of book I'm going to call in the book club is one that people need a nudge to read -- classics, smart-stuff. I don't need a nudge to read the sort of entertainment fiction I already read. Like, I don't need a nudge to read the Jack Reacher book Killing Floor; I already did that, without a nudge. Nor the sci-fi candy Ready Player One.

So, that said, and feel free to recommend books, but there's no point saying "You should read the Vince Flynn book" because, while I take your recommendation seriously, it's also the case that I'd read the new Vince Flynn book if I liked the cover and the first few pages.

Ultimately I want to do Moby Dick, but I guess I need to build to that. Maybe at some point I'll try Huckleberry Finn, another classic I was supposed to have read but did not.


Choice: CBD suggested Poe's "Fall of the House of Usher," which I always wanted to read. I have no idea what it's about, though I suppose there's a house involved, and some substandard foundation work.

It's 7000 words, so it's just a short story, a mere tenth of a novel, and it's free on Kindle (and B&N, I assume).

It's also available freely at project Guttenberg, here.

So Fall of the House of Usher it is!

This is very exciting!

Let's go for... um, I dunno. Let's go for the Sunday after next.

Posted by: Ace at 01:16 PM | Comments (530)
Post contains 384 words, total size 2 kb.

1 "So I Married an F-35"

Posted by: J.J. Sefton at June 30, 2015 01:18 PM (St6BJ)

2 Eastern Approaches by Fitzroy MacLean. Per Amazon: "This is the classic true adventure story of a man who by the pen, the sword and the diplomatic pouch influenced some of the most significant events of our era. Here Fitzroy Maclean recounts his extraordinary adventures in Soviet Central Asia, in the Western Desert, where he specialized in hair-raising commando-style raids behind enemy lines, and with Tito's partisans during the last months of the German occupation of Yugoslavia. An enthralling narrative, brilliantly told, "Eastern Approaches" is also a vivid personal view of episodes that have already become part of history."

Posted by: steffmckee at June 30, 2015 01:19 PM (w+mZJ)

3

"Starting Strength 3rd Edition" by Mark Rippetoe

 

 

Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 01:20 PM (W6iIX)

4 The Goblin King, by Katherine Addison. It's a Hugo nominee and it's a quasi-steampunk fantasy book about the unlikely goblin heir to an Elvish empire who ascends to the throne when the rest of his family is killed. He finds his footing through a lot of court intrigue. It's exquisitely written and partly a reaction to the George RR Martin "grimdark" trend in fantasy. Highly recommended.

Posted by: Zoomie at June 30, 2015 01:20 PM (3l9k4)

5

"Carnage and Culture"

by Victor Davis Hanson

Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 01:21 PM (W6iIX)

6 Something by Tom Wolfe. Great combination of good, solid writing and smart cultural criticism. He becomes more relevant by the day.

Posted by: Hermocrates at June 30, 2015 01:22 PM (0J4L7)

7 Ugh, Goblin Emperor, not Goblin King.

Posted by: Zoomie at June 30, 2015 01:22 PM (3l9k4)

8 The Unincorporated Man by Dani Kollin and Eytan Kollin

Posted by: xanderphife at June 30, 2015 01:22 PM (guwq9)

9 Shelby Foote's "The Civil War" seems timely since we appear to be refighting it.

Posted by: Wyatt's Torch at June 30, 2015 01:22 PM (DeqSC)

10 >>> Something by Tom Wolfe. Great combination of good, solid writing and smart cultural criticism. He becomes more relevant by the day. hmmm... kinda interested in the Right Stuff

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:23 PM (bhepQ)

11 'Twilight.'

Or, alternately, Twilight fanfic.

Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel at June 30, 2015 01:23 PM (oVJmc)

12 Moral Origins by Christopher Boehm. It approaches morality and ethics from an evolutionary biology standpoint. You'll understand a lot about both conservatives and liberals after reading it. It's the best non-fiction book I've read in the last five years.

Posted by: Billy Hollis at June 30, 2015 01:23 PM (aqIx8)

13 The Road to Serfdom was good and depressing. Hayek really understood the tendency of government to continually ratchet up control and oppression and he's got a good theory on why that is virtually inevitable. That being said, I read Farewell to Reality: How Modern Physics Has Betrayed the Search for Scientific Truth recently. It was an interesting take on modern physics and cosmology. The author is highly critical of string theory, super-symmetry and M theory and questions whether they can even really be called science.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 01:23 PM (8ZskC)

14 Ace,

How about a classic short story? That way even if it sucks most people will finish it, and lead time will be a few days instead of a few weeks.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 30, 2015 01:23 PM (Zu3d9)

15 Enders Game

Posted by: Zakn at June 30, 2015 01:23 PM (fE9nD)

16 >>>oral Origins by Christopher Boehm. It approaches morality and ethics from an evolutionary biology standpoint. You'll understand a lot about both conservatives and liberals after reading it. It's the best non-fiction book I've read in the last five years. i might just put this one on my own list.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:23 PM (bhepQ)

17 Gor

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (SyKbw)

18 Allen Bloom and the elder Podhoretz say that "Middlemarch" is the best novel ever written in English. I can't believe this is true and am looking for an excuse to put that proposition to the test.

Posted by: Von Bismarck at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (43DWb)

19 Call me Huckleberry.

Posted by: Ishmael Huckleberry at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (W5DcG)

20 I suggest that everyone read Extraordinary Popular Delusions & The Madness Of Crowds by Charles Mackay. This book is one of four books in my personal Must Read List. Seriously. I mentioned these before. If you only read 4 books in your life, they must be: 1. The Holy Bible 2. Extraordinary Popular Delusions & The Madness Of Crowds 3. A Conflict Of Visions 4. The Godfather All you need to know to understand human nature and human folly is in these books.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (ye7KB)

21 'Twilight.' Or, alternately, Twilight fanfic. Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel I have some original "Twilight" fanfics.

Posted by: Emma Sulkowicz at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (tgnRB)

22 I Read Right Stuff last summer. It was great. Better than the movie (which I also liked).

Posted by: Hermocrates at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (0J4L7)

23 I could go for Road to Serfdom.

Posted by: chemjeff at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (2ap0X)

24 Thomas Sowell's Vision of the Annointed and F.A. Hayek's Road to Serfdom.

I'd go with VoftA.  It's a short, relatively easy read.  RtS, not so much.

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:24 PM (LAe3v)

25 >>>That being said, I read Farewell to Reality: How Modern Physics Has Betrayed the Search for Scientific Truth recently. It was an interesting take on modern physics and cosmology. The author is highly critical of string theory, super-symmetry and M theory and questions whether they can even really be called science. interesting, I read about that debate, I might have read this particular critic in shorter form. I'm reading that pop-science writer, the one with the initials MK, japanese name, on wormholes and the fifth dimension and super-string theory right now.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:25 PM (bhepQ)

26 I am reading Look Homeward, Angel by Thomas Wolfe. It's good. Also, I read that Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde once competed for the same girl. Lucky for her, Stoker won.

Posted by: jmel at June 30, 2015 01:25 PM (cfFqn)

27 I read Dracula a year or two ago. I enjoyed it until Van Helsing showed up, don't know why but his character annoyed the heck out of me.

Posted by: Kenway at June 30, 2015 01:25 PM (HhHk8)

28 >>>How about a classic short story? That way even if it sucks most people will finish it, and lead time will be a few days instead of a few weeks. that's a good idea... any suggestions? I always want to read Poe.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:25 PM (bhepQ)

29 Dreadnought - Robert K. Massie. Guadalcanal: The Definitive Account of the Landmark Battle - Richard B. Frank. Unless you want ghey shit.

Posted by: MIG-25 at June 30, 2015 01:26 PM (CFcIt)

30 "Replenishing the Earth" by James Belich [Note: Neither the author nor the publisher have financed, authorized, or are aware of this comment.]

Posted by: RioBravo at June 30, 2015 01:26 PM (NUqwG)

31 @24
Which is not to say we shouldn't do meaty books, just that after the last one, I think you're going to want to encourage people that there is a good payoff without too much effort.  VoftA is a good example.

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:26 PM (LAe3v)

32 Off-topic: For you Healthshare types out there, my wife and I moments ago enrolled in Samaritan Ministries. I am relieved and hopeful to have settled on that (we lost my wife's insurance due to layoff at end of February). If anyone can spare a prayer or two, we'd appreciate it. She's experiencing symptoms that might be cervical cancer *knock on wood*, as it runs in her family. I would hope not at 32, but we've had issues there before (two miscarriages, irregular periods). Hopefully it's just hormones, but it's at a point where she needs to be seen, and we're spooked. God bless all.

Posted by: Hawkins1701 at June 30, 2015 01:26 PM (m9HtY)

33 2 Second recommendation for Eastern Approaches. I have loaned my book out to neighbors and famoly. All rave about the book. Once, I did not get it back, and bought it again. His Show Trial coverage is very timely. I loved how he got out of the Foreign Service and into his father's Regiment in WWII, Private to Brigadier in 6 years. The last few pages are a classic as well.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 30, 2015 01:26 PM (u82oZ)

34 >>>I suggest that everyone read Extraordinary Popular Delusions & The Madness Of Crowds by Charles Mackay. sounds interesting.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:26 PM (bhepQ)

35 Can't bear to read anything political right now.  I need escapism to maintain what's left of my sanity.

I've been reading Brad Thor (natch), and just picked up Nelson DeMille's "The Quest."  Anything Preston and Child.  Am nearing the end of "The Lost Island", a Gideon Crew novel. 

That's my two cents.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 01:27 PM (FsuaD)

36 I should add that I got a BA in English just to take classes with someone I was in lust with. All my profs were Bolshie-croakers, so I learned nothing. Tip of the cap to you Ace. This is appreciated.

Posted by: Von Bismarck at June 30, 2015 01:27 PM (43DWb)

37 Ace--did you ever read Flashman?

Posted by: Lord Haw Haw at June 30, 2015 01:27 PM (IkTb7)

38 29 Dreadnought - Robert K. Massie.

Great book, as was Castles of Steel, but a limited audience, I think.

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:27 PM (LAe3v)

39 Oh, and I didn't mean to suggest my reading material should be Book Club material.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 01:27 PM (FsuaD)

40 >>> Ace--did you ever read Flashman? i got about 80 pages in, then put it down, a few months ago. I want to finish it. (The first one, obvs.)

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:28 PM (bhepQ)

41

"A History of English Speaking Peoples"

4 volume set by Sir Winston S. Churchill

Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 01:28 PM (W6iIX)

42 And "Dracula" is great. My favorite part--most of the characters are English professionals (a doctor, a lawyer, a nobleman, etc.), but then there's also a cowboy from Texas. A crazy guy possessed by Drac suggests to him that the US should annex Poland.

Posted by: Hermocrates at June 30, 2015 01:28 PM (0J4L7)

43 I guess no one took me seriously with my idea about picture books. Oh well.

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:28 PM (AkOaV)

44 6 Something by Tom Wolfe. Great combination of good, solid writing and smart cultural criticism. He becomes more relevant by the day. Posted by: Hermocrates at June 30, 2015 06:22 PM (0J4L7) --Reading Back to Blood. So far, so good. And hey, how about some history? Lots of historical milestones upon us. Then again, I've always been partial to non-fiction vs. fiction. I'm reading 3 WWI books now.

Posted by: logprof at June 30, 2015 01:28 PM (JVgzo)

45 How about The Collapse of Complex Societies (New Studies in Archaeology) by Joseph A. Tainter (198 . Timely. For the speed readers, just go to Chapter 6 for the answer.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 30, 2015 01:28 PM (u82oZ)

46 I'd like to read "The Vision of the Anointed" by Thomas Sowell. I've always enjoyed the articles on his website but have never read his books and it's always been recommended. And as far as CBD's suggestion of short story how about "Bartleby the Scrivener" by Melville? You've mentioned that several times, Ace, and it's one of my favorites too. Maybe other people like it too or would if they haven't read it since high school?

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:29 PM (OSs/l)

47 Dracula is great, as is Frankenstein (and short) and they're fun to read also because of what they share and don't share with the popular (movie) representations. Dracula ain't no sexy thing, and women being attracted to them is sign of feminine weakness, IIRC. Frankenstein...did he have a soul? Another good one is "When Worlds Collide", though the sequel ("After Worlds Collide" not so much). Meyrink's "The Golem". I had trouble reading Poe because of all the French. That might be a plus for you. Maybe "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym"? Love me some Victor Hugo..."Hunchback" is hilarious...but it ain't short. Washington Irving? I remember how surprised I was that "Sleepy Hollow" is (very clearly) comedic. We could read some James Fenimore Cooper and follow-up with Twain's essay on Cooper's literary offenses. Heh. How about Jon Swift? Gulliver's Travels?

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 01:29 PM (7zeA4)

48 Just keep this in mind ace. Every book you pick will generate different interest. So you might strike a book that everyone wants to read and there will be lots of discussion or one very few people read and so it's kind of empty. Don't let those discourage you from doing another. And when you do get to Moby Dick I would consider breaking it up into goals of discussing the book at specific chapter intervals so it doesn't feel like as much of slog to have it all read by a set date right at the start.

Posted by: Buzzion at June 30, 2015 01:29 PM (z/Ubi)

49 The Right Stuff is a fantastic book.

Posted by: aquaviva at June 30, 2015 01:29 PM (QdrYb)

50 Walter Jon Williams: Dread Empires Fall trilogy.

Posted by: Jack at June 30, 2015 01:29 PM (53CCM)

51 43 I guess no one took me seriously with my idea about picture books.

Oh well. Posted by: mynewhandle


Well, I like the idea.

Posted by: Joe B. at June 30, 2015 01:29 PM (LAe3v)

52 I'm reading that pop-science writer, the one with the initials MK, japanese name, on wormholes and the fifth dimension and super-string theory right now. Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:25 PM (bhepQ) Check out Edge by Koji Suzuki (author of Ringu). Has a lot of those elements with a fair amount of horror mixed in. Plus an impending apocalypse that is partially created by math. And math is scary in its own right.

Posted by: Bete resigned to just watching the world burn at June 30, 2015 01:29 PM (F9322)

53 >>>And as far as CBD's suggestion of short story how about "Bartleby the Scrivener" by Melville? You've mentioned that several times, Ace, and it's one of my favorites too. Maybe other people like it too or would if they haven't read it since high school? yeah but i've already read it like three times Maybe later.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:30 PM (bhepQ)

54 'Twilight.'

Or, alternately, Twilight fanfic.
Posted by: Pappy O'Daniel


Can we bring back the chapter-by-chapter destruction of Fifty Shades of Grey? I had no idea the writing was so bad until Ace's post. And oh, how it made me laugh.....

Posted by: pookysgirl walks like a pirate at June 30, 2015 01:30 PM (IJeUX)

55 "The Year's Best Military SF & Space Opera" from Baen Books, just recently released

Posted by: Greg Shackelford at June 30, 2015 01:30 PM (WBrKl)

56 I'm reading that pop-science writer, the one with the initials MK, japanese name, on wormholes and the fifth dimension and super-string theory right now. I went on a tear for several months and read a lot of those popular physics books in a short time. Max Tegmark's book Our Mathematical Universe was probably the kind of theory that Farewell to Reality criticized, but it posits that at its most foundational level, our universe is nothing but a mathematical structure. Tegmark says that the only fundamental characteristics of particles are mathematical. If you want a book that makes you scratch your head, that's a great one.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 01:30 PM (8ZskC)

57 Amity Shales "The Forgotten Man"

Posted by: Slapweasel (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i][/b][/u][/s] at June 30, 2015 01:30 PM (OQ9R7)

58 Never Let Me Go, Kazuo Ishigura. This book will break your heart. A meditation on what is a soul and who has one. Also a warning on just because you can doesn't mean you should,

Posted by: Harp at June 30, 2015 01:30 PM (NY/Xw)

59 Posted by: Hawkins1701 at June 30, 2015 06:26 PM (m9HtY) IMO, prayer concerns are never off topic. I believe in prayer. I can see why all that would be a concern. I will certainly keep your wife in prayer and you too.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (OSs/l)

60 >>>had trouble reading Poe because of all the French. That might be a plus for you. Maybe "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym"? this one's incomplete, isn't it? Interesting choices, Gulliver's Travels especially...

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (bhepQ)

61 Failure Is Not an Option:  Mission Control From Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond, by Gene Kranz.  Great book from the infancy of the Space Program through the Apollo missions Kranz was a part of.  It's not an easy read, but it was extremely good.  Plus, I have a signed copy by Mr. Kranz himself, so I love the book all the more.

Posted by: Lady in Black at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (0u3uY)

62 "Life at the Bottom" by Theodore Dalrymple

Posted by: ben at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (L3u1y)

63 It's not exactly good but could do The Secret Gospels

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (SyKbw)

64 And when you do get to Moby Dick I would consider breaking it up into goals of discussing the book at specific chapter intervals so it doesn't feel like as much of slog to have it all read by a set date right at the start.

Good idea.

We could read some James Fenimore Cooper

Another good idea.  I've never understood why he gets such bad reviews.  Now, Norman Mailer...

Posted by: Joe B. at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (LAe3v)

65 Huck Finn is a good choice. But I recommend "Ideas Have Consequences." I admit I just read it recently, but wish to read it again. It is by all accounts an important conservative book. One that few have probably read. And more importantly, relatively short.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (gmeXX)

66 Eric Flint's 1632 if it hasn't been done before. Small West Virginia town dropped into the middle of "Germany" in the Thirty Years War. It -is- entertainment. But. It exhaustively covers a very large swath of why many of the items in the Bill of Rights are there. It covers a chunk of history that is a footnote-at-best at the high school level. It covers aspects of marriage, dowries, and common law that don't mesh precisely with modern interpretations - and are thus interesting to think about. The author is a historian, and apparently a card-carrying Communist. But the only particular facet he seems to really latch on (although not in a too-preachy way) is "Strong Unions!" Which ... I don't mind so much for the -mine-workers-of-America.

Posted by: Alan at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (ZkOKz)

67 "that's a good idea... any suggestions? I always want to read Poe." ________ O. Henry wrote a bunch of good, short reads. I'm especially fond of ones with Jeff Peters. Mark Twain had some good shorties, too.

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 01:31 PM (yckiS)

68

"Animal Farm" and "1984" by George Orwell

 

or has everyone already read those.  they are pretty quick reads tho

Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 01:32 PM (W6iIX)

69 Okay, guys, I shit you not -- BuzzFeed has an article on "the 23 best picture books of 2014" presumably for their readers perusal. http://tinyurl.com/pj87n57 Yikes. Although number 6 does look interesting... 6. Once Upon an Alphabet: Short Stories for All the Letters by Oliver Jeffers

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:32 PM (AkOaV)

70 "Women Good, Men Bad" -- Connie St Louis

Posted by: Connie St. Louis at June 30, 2015 01:32 PM (TJCSB)

71 I always want to read Poe.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:25 PM (bhepQ)

"The Fall of The House of Usher" is a good one....

"The Masque of The Red Death" is one of my favorites.

If you want to piss everyone off, how about "Bartleby The Scrivener?" It's impenetrable, but at least it's shorter than Moby Dick.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 30, 2015 01:32 PM (Zu3d9)

72 Valis by Philip K Dick

Posted by: dumpsterjuice at June 30, 2015 01:33 PM (Hsg8V)

73 44 6 Something by Tom Wolfe. Great combination of good, solid writing and smart cultural criticism. He becomes more relevant by the day.
Posted by: Hermocrates at June 30, 2015 06:22 PM (0J4L7)




Love Tom Wolfe.  When our son was little, husband and I were discussing one of his novels over dinner one night.  A couple of nights later, we're at the in-laws', and a friend of my FIL was there.  Tall, husky former GA Tech football player.


Son asks him, "Are you the man in full?"

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 01:33 PM (FsuaD)

74 David Copperfield

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 01:33 PM (e7T6D)

75 Ace-
it seems that we're diverging into fiction and nonfiction.  It might be a good idea to pick one category, and then alternate. 

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:33 PM (LAe3v)

76 Maybe at some point I'll try Huckleberry Finn, another classic I was supposed to have read but did not. ---- Start with some of Twain's short stories in omnibus form. Try a couple of the shorter ones. If you don't like them, you don't like them. No point spending hours on Huckleberry Finn. But if you get pulled in, you'll want to read Huck Finn without a nudge. That's my suggestion.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 01:33 PM (VAsIq)

77 I'd toss in Pride and Prejudice. It reads pretty well for a 19th century novel. Some nice wit in there. If you haven't read Jane Austen, I'd start there. Or we could just do 'I am Legend'.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at June 30, 2015 01:33 PM (pWzW/)

78 "Animal Farm" and "1984" by George Orwell or has everyone already read those. they are pretty quick reads tho Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 06:32 PM (W6iIX) Yes, but it would be good to re-read Animal Farm, with minimal investment of time. Haven't read it since highschool. 1984 I've read a few times since high school though... Not really worth re-reading.

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:33 PM (AkOaV)

79 Road to Serfdom is great, but he sometimes meanders around like somebody talking too fast, covering every possible permutation or objection. If you make a point of remembering what chapter you're on (just the chapter name is enough), it's easier to stay focused on the point he's making and not get lost in details. Just remember the chapter title as you read. It is a truly great book, and I really came to like the guy after reading it.

Posted by: sandy burger at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (rHbEC)

80 "Fall of the House of Usher...?" Hm, anyone up for that one, as just a short story to get this party-restarted? It's almost certainly available for free online and on kindle. then we can do Vision of the Annointed, and then go for something longer.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (bhepQ)

81 For science Matt Ridley is a good author. His The Red Queen: Sex and the Evolution of Human Nature is dated, but holds up well. Very interesting. He wrote a later book, Genome, The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters. I liked that one a lot. It helps organize thinking about human nature.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (u82oZ)

82 Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. -Groucho Marx

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t [/i][/s][/b][/u] at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (eEb+d)

83 "Madness of crowds" is so much fun, as long as you don't, you know, extrapolate in to total despair. "Pym" is Poe's only complete novel, I believe.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (7zeA4)

84 P.S, Hawkins-This is a prayer center I used to volunteer with. Sometimes it's hard to get someone on the line, but you can always go to the section "request prayer" and fill in your wife's first name and state. They pass these prayer requests to people around the country and it's good to know that people you may not even know care and will pray for dear ones on your heart: http://prayer-center.upperroom.org

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (OSs/l)

85 28 >>>How about a classic short story? That way even if it sucks most people will finish it, and lead time will be a few days instead of a few weeks. that's a good idea... any suggestions? I always want to read Poe. Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:25 PM (bhepQ) Then kill two Ravens with one stone. The Cask of Amontillado

Posted by: Buzzion at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (z/Ubi)

86 Dracula is a good book and it's short.  I read it when in high school 40 some years ago and again about 20 years ago.  Stuff written in the 19th century that has held up.

Posted by: huerfano at June 30, 2015 01:34 PM (bynk/)

87 46 I'd like to read "The Vision of the Anointed" by Thomas Sowell. I've always enjoyed the articles on his website but have never read his books and it's always been recommended. Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 06:29 PM (OSs/l) --I thought Conquests and Cultures by Sowell was better. A neat counter to Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel.

Posted by: logprof at June 30, 2015 01:35 PM (JVgzo)

88 >>>I'd toss in Pride and Prejudice. It reads pretty well for a 19th century novel. Some nice wit in there. If you haven't read Jane Austen, I'd start there. for the ladies, and because I understand it's good, i'd be interested in trying that one.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:35 PM (bhepQ)

89 If you want to piss everyone off, how about "Bartleby The Scrivener?" It's impenetrable, but at least it's shorter than Moby Dick. Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo I'd prefer not to.

Posted by: Everyone in 3,2,1 at June 30, 2015 01:35 PM (VAsIq)

90 If you are at all into Roman history or ancient history in general, Appian"s "The Civil Wars" is a good read, or Suetonius' "Twelve Caesars" (get the Robert Graves translation) is fun.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living... at June 30, 2015 01:35 PM (W6ipS)

91 When "The Giver" came out as a movie, I heard enough good things to read the book. It's YA so I didn't find it a slog. Also heard it contained conservative themes. Lois Lowry's the author. (No more spoilers beyond these.)

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 01:35 PM (yckiS)

92 Be interesting to get people to read the Lord Dunsany. His collection, In The Land Of Time is a good starting point

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 01:35 PM (SyKbw)

93 If we are going to do Moby Dick, I'd better start now. I hope to be ready for the June 23, 2018 book thread.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:35 PM (gmeXX)

94 Tom Jones, or The Three Musketeers.  Both classics, both for very good reasons.

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:36 PM (LAe3v)

95 Dreadnought - Robert K. Massie. Great book, as was Castles of Steel, but a limited audience, I think. Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 06:27 PM (LAe3v) *Off rust bucket, piece of shit sock* Yeah, the background, political situation/leadup to WWI, Jacky Fischer, et al....fantastic read.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain at June 30, 2015 01:36 PM (CFcIt)

96 I am always up for Poe.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 01:36 PM (7zeA4)

97 >>>If you are at all into Roman history or ancient history in general, Appian"s "The Civil Wars" is a good read, or Suetonius' "Twelve Caesars" (get the Robert Graves translation) is fun. good stuff but i have this idea that history appeals chiefly to men and i'm going for a mixed-sex thing here.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:36 PM (bhepQ)

98 "The Giver" book is an easy read and much better than the movie.

Posted by: Mark1971 at June 30, 2015 01:36 PM (vaR50)

99 Forgotten Skills of Cooking by Darina Allen

Posted by: rld77 far far away at June 30, 2015 01:36 PM (P7ECb)

100 yeah, maybe a page limiter?  I mean, like limit to books less than 600 pgs or what?

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 01:36 PM (e7T6D)

101 Lord of the Rings LORD OF THE RINGS

Posted by: rdbrewer at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (Iyg03)

102 Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 06:33 PM (VAsIq)

"Life On The Mississippi" is a fun read.....

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (Zu3d9)

103 Road to Serfdom, duh! --- America Alone and/or After America - Mark Steyn ------- The Money Game - Adam Smith (everything old is new again!) ------- Guns, Germs and Steel - Jared Diamond

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (h53OH)

104 Twain's "Following the Equator" is in our library.  I've been meaning to read it.  For years.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (FsuaD)

105 heh... I was going to suggest Castles of Steel.... mainly because I bought it a year ago and haven't gotten to it yet..

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (e7T6D)

106 How about Nicholas Nickleby?. It has some great humor about actors and every one can dump on the loathsome schoolmaster Squeers As a sometimes actor I appreciated the humor about actors

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (OSs/l)

107 The Yellow River, by I.P. Daley that was a good one

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (bhepQ)

108 Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 06:35 PM (gmeXX) Well for a shorter and more interesting read, how about all 6 volumes of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire? Or for some more uplifting prose, why not The Rise and Fall of The Third Reich? Or for something easier for our modern eyes to read, why not James Joyces' "Ulysses"

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:37 PM (AkOaV)

109 Lord Dunsany is great. "Pride and Prejudice" is often cited as the greatest novel of the English language, and I am hard-pressed to argue. I read it many times years before I ever heard anyone call it a chick book. What it is is really funny. That almost never comes out in the movies.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 01:38 PM (7zeA4)

110 I'd prefer not to. LOL. Touche.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:38 PM (OSs/l)

111 >>>How about Nicholas Nickleby?. It has some great humor about actors and every one can dump on the loathsome schoolmaster Squeers As a sometimes actor I appreciated the humor about actors if i were going to dickens i'd suggest tale of two cities... though I don't know if i can get through dickens.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (bhepQ)

112 Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 06:37 PM (AkOaV) ----- I cannot get threw the Rise and Fall.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (gmeXX)

113 i'm going for a mixed-sex thing here. Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:36 PM (bhepQ) We prefer Trans-Sex, but thanks for thinking of me. ;-)

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (AkOaV)

114
--I thought Conquests and Cultures by Sowell was better. A neat counter to Diamond's Guns, Germs, and Steel.
Posted by: logprof


Of there's anyone more overestimated than Toni Morrison, it's this guy.  Every school in the country makes kids read it.  Mine were astonished that I'd read it, and was underwhelmed.

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (LAe3v)

115 I cannot get threw the Rise and Fall. ---- Or through for that matter.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (gmeXX)

116 The Yellow River, by I.P. Daley that was a good one Posted by: ace A great rebuttal to Lines In The Sand by Peter Dragon.

Posted by: Prince Ludwig the Indestructible at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (tgnRB)

117 Classic short stories are great. For instance The Birthmark by Hawthorne is entertaining. My favorite book is an old tattered paperback I had since I was a kid that is falling apart. First published in 1954, (I have an edition from the 60's), Short Story Masterpieces is a collection 36 entertaining stories, most very short, all excellent. Great for the nightstand.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (ye7KB)

118 Fritz Leiber's Conjure Wife is a good one if you want both sexes to read the book

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (SyKbw)

119 I cannot get threw the Rise and Fall. Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 06:39 PM (gmeXX) I slugged through Rise and fall of the third reich years ago. Really wasnt worth it, but it was a marathon i started and felt I had to complete.

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (AkOaV)

120 I have read Road to Serfdom and Dracula.  I loved Dracula it held me so bad I was taking it to school and reading behind books.  Road to Serfdom is the quintessential book that shows why socialism never works, but it can be very dry working your way through to get the great political pearls of wisdom it contains.


Another great book(s) in the political category that is a classic is Democracy In America by Alexis de Tocqueville.   Anyone who has not read that should certainly give it a shot.  But if the idea is to complete this "read in a week that may not be possible.


But both vol 1 and 2 are available from project Gutenberg free.

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 01:39 PM (GpgJl)

121 House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski This is best read in actual book format since the typography and layout is a significant part of the book.

Posted by: alexthechick - Come to us SMOD at June 30, 2015 01:40 PM (IrByp)

122 Josey Wales... 

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 01:40 PM (e7T6D)

123 Fyodor Dostoyevski's Brothers Karamozov and Crime and Punishment, Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace .  Although more characters than a Russian phone book and less plot, they are a chore that you will appreciate in the end.

Posted by: John Doe@AnotherQuidam at June 30, 2015 01:40 PM (g1MTt)

124 Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 06:37 PM (AkOaV) ----- From Dawn to Decadence. The epilogue may need to be updated.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:40 PM (gmeXX)

125 i got 100 pages into guns germs and steel and decided he was boring and too pc to be credible. Like every page he was yelling 'Minorities are cool!" I get it, fella. I get it.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:40 PM (bhepQ)

126 Barack Obama's Collected Doggerels

Posted by: rdbrewer at June 30, 2015 01:40 PM (Iyg03)

127 Guns, Germs and Steel - Jared Diamond Posted by: Comrade Arthur at June 30, 2015 06:37 PM ________ Excellent book.

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (yckiS)

128 Ulysses -- James Joyce

Posted by: Dr Spank at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (TJCSB)

129 Democracy In America by Alexis de Tocqueville. Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 06:39 PM (GpgJl) I actually like that idea. That's a book I read (skimmed) in high school, but would love to re-read...

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (AkOaV)

130 112 Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 06:37 PM (AkOaV) ----- I cannot get threw the Rise and Fall. It picks up on side 2, starting with "Our House."

Posted by: Hermocrates at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (0J4L7)

131 How to Pick Up Chicks

Posted by: best, Mike at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (p0KI9)

132 though I don't know if i can get through dickens.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:39 PM (bhepQ)

"Great Expectations" is a good one, with some wonderful views of the class system of 19th century England. Not a slog, although admittedly not a breeze either.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (Zu3d9)

133 Legion, by Abnett.

Posted by: Iblis at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (9221z)

134 Incidentally, how awesome and how telling is it that X-X-tie announced his candidacy today and AoS didn't bother covering it?!?

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (ye7KB)

135 Hemingway's To Have and Have Not - protagonist is an old time Florida contraband smuggler running booze and people between Key West and Cuba.

Posted by: Alec Leamas at June 30, 2015 01:41 PM (kz2eW)

136 84 P.S, Hawkins-This is a prayer center I used to volunteer with. Sometimes it's hard to get someone on the line, but you can always go to the section "request prayer" and fill in your wife's first name and state. They pass these prayer requests to people around the country and it's good to know that people you may not even know care and will pray for dear ones on your heart: http://prayer-center.upperroom.org Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 06:34 PM (OSs/l) Thank you bud. Really truly means a lot.

Posted by: Hawkins1701 at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (m9HtY)

137 Dreams From My Father? We'd be the first people to actually read it, so there's that...

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (AkOaV)

138 The Last Lion: Alone is superb, but quite long, so I guess not. The Innocents Abroad is hilarious. I think people don't read it because it's a classic, so it must be boring, but it's great. "Is he...is he dead?" Sowell is always welcome. Poe is intense but mostly too short. I could use a nudge to read "Liberal Fascism," but the times do not make me want to read depressing books.

Posted by: Splunge at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (qyomX)

139 Some of Your Blood would be a great quick read

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (SyKbw)

140

"Saving the Planet with Pesticides and Plastic"

 

by Dennis Avery

 

Ha ! suck it enviro-crazies

 

Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (W6iIX)

141 Speaking of Robert K. Massie, Nicholas and Alexandra was an excellent book.  As I recall, it's quite long, but I couldn't put it down.  Historical recounting of the last Russian Czar and Czarina, their family, Rasputin and the turmoil and ultimate destruction he brought.

Posted by: Lady in Black at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (0u3uY)

142 I slugged through Rise and fall of the third reich years ago. ----- You know what book I could not get through - The Forgotten Man. Not sure why. Its not long.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (gmeXX)

143 The True Believer by Eric Hoffer A classic on the nature of fanatical mass movements.

Posted by: Long Running Fool at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (/A5gb)

144 How does Ace feel about Gov X-X-tie? Two words: Honey. Badger. Doesn't even care enough to mention he doens't even care.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (ye7KB)

145 arms of krupp..william manchester

Posted by: nuk3dawg at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (2z4UX)

146 Mark Helprin's "A Soldier of the Great War".  IMO the best book of fiction published in at least the last 30 years. 

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:42 PM (LAe3v)

147 Short stories: "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" --Flannery O'Connor "Haircut" --Ring Lairdner "The Cask of Amantillado" --Poe "The Open Boat" --Stephen Crane "Heart of Darkness" --Joseph Conrad "Hills Like White Elephants" --Ernest Hemingway "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" --James Thurber "The Pedestrian" --Ray Bradbury Just a start . . .

Posted by: logprof USA!! at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (JVgzo)

148 >>>"Great Expectations" is a good one, with some wonderful views of the class system of 19th century England. Not a slog, although admittedly not a breeze either. sounds loverly!

Posted by: m' name is Pippins, guv'ner at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (bhepQ)

149 OT: Well I just made a significant contribution to Mike Flynn, so he's pretty much guaranteed to lose now.

Sorry!

(p.s., it would have been a larger contribution, but I was afraid to invite the attention of the fascists.)

Posted by: Kensington (@NYKensington) at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (7Kbxu)

150 Books from other comments I support ---- Carnage and Culture Extraordinary delusions ... This is pretty long. Might want to limit it to selected chapters. Maybe the Tulip bubble and witch burnings. the Forgotten Man 1632 (clever idea to include this!)

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (h53OH)

151 though I don't know if i can get through dickens. Posted by: ace Hard Times is a pretty easy read as Dickens goes.

Posted by: Prince Ludwig the Indestructible at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (tgnRB)

152 'A Confederate General From Big Sur' - Richard Brautigan.

Posted by: Garrett at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (p0KI9)

153 The Law. Bastiat.

Posted by: Golfman at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (48QDY)

154 Mere Christianity would be good, especially in times such as these.

Posted by: Lauren at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (MYCIw)

155 i got 100 pages into guns germs and steel and decided he was boring and too pc to be credible. Like every page he was yelling 'Minorities are cool!" Diamond definitely had an agenda. I believe it was "if it wasn't for your grains, and your legumes, and your goats and your horses, you white Europeans would be no better than anyone else."

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (8ZskC)

156 Moby Dick - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRJ9_yHiNmg

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this sh1t [/i][/s][/b][/u] at June 30, 2015 01:43 PM (eEb+d)

157 Democracy In America by Alexis de Tocqueville. Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 06:39 PM (GpgJl) I actually like that idea. That's a book I read (skimmed) in high school, but would love to re-read... ----- I'd be up for that. But I think it will take longer to get through than people think. No love for Ideas Have Consequences? Its only 150 pages.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:44 PM (gmeXX)

158 The Dude and I have similar tastes in literature, if not computer games.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 01:44 PM (7zeA4)

159 "April Morning" by Howard Fast
Amazingly patriotic book written by a Communist.  Short novel, too.

Posted by: Grad School Fool at June 30, 2015 01:44 PM (A9KzJ)

160 How about "Silverlock" by John Myers Myers?

It is sort of a journey through western literature. The end is a little creaky but it is a lot of fun getting there.

Posted by: the guy that moves pianos for a living... at June 30, 2015 01:44 PM (W6ipS)

161 137 Dreams From My Father?

We'd be the first people to actually read it, so there's that...

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 06:42 PM (AkOaV)



*wipes monitor*

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 01:44 PM (FsuaD)

162 heh... I was going to suggest Castles of Steel.... mainly because I bought it a year ago and haven't gotten to it yet.. Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 06:37 PM (e7T6D) I missed that when it first came out (2004?) and am most interested as a follow on to Dreadnaught.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain at June 30, 2015 01:44 PM (CFcIt)

163 okay, i'm intrigued by Fall of the House of Usher because 1, I want to read poe, 2, i hear it cited all the time, and best of all 3, I really have no idea what it's about so I am spoiler-free. Plus, short, and free. Is this acceptable to the group?

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:44 PM (bhepQ)

164 You know what book I could not get through - The Forgotten Man. Not sure why. Its not long. Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 06:42 PM (gmeXX) Have it on the bookshelf. Have not read it. Bought $500 in books at 90% when borders was going out of business. Don't think I'll ever finish all of them. It's a shit ton of books. I forgot how many it was until I moved and had to lug all of them in to and out of a uhaul. My buddy who was helping me move looked at me after the 20th box or so and said, "what the fuck? Havent you ever heard of a kindle?"

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:45 PM (AkOaV)

165 >>122 Josey Wales... What a flick!

Posted by: Garrett at June 30, 2015 01:45 PM (p0KI9)

166 90% off *

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:45 PM (AkOaV)

167 I liked "Not Wanted on The Voyage" by Timothy Findley. It is an interesting take on the story of Noah's Arc and there is sh*tloads of imagery and allegory if you want to read deeply into it.

Posted by: cold canadian at June 30, 2015 01:45 PM (3wv6l)

168 @132 CBD...  Copperfield is my favorite so far, but Great Expectations I really like too.  I read it first time since grade school about two years ago and was struck on how much I missed as a 15 years old.  Go figure... 

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 01:45 PM (e7T6D)

169 Fyodor Dostoyevski's Brothers Karamozov The Grand Inquisitor part of the novel is truly an important read. In fact, I certainly add that excellent parable to my Must Read List.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:45 PM (ye7KB)

170 Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:44 PM (bhepQ) And thusly it has been decreed.

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:46 PM (AkOaV)

171 The only diamond book I read was the THird Chimpanzee. I found it pretty interesting - agenda aside. Maybe I'll take up Guns, Germs and Steel.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:46 PM (gmeXX)

172 Plus, short, and free.

Is this acceptable to the group?


I dunno.  It's short, but really, is there that much to say about it?

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 01:46 PM (LAe3v)

173 Posted by: ace

Threadender!

Posted by: Dr Spank at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (TJCSB)

174 i got 100 pages into guns germs and steel and decided he was boring and too pc to be credible. Like every page he was yelling 'Minorities are cool!" Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:40 PM ________ I didn't get that from him. Ah, well. There are some things (like baseball) that I don't get but I'm glad that other people understand and enjoy them. And then there's stuff (GG&S, EDM) that I enjoy but seem unable to share my appreciation with anyone.

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (yckiS)

175 163 okay, i'm intrigued by Fall of the House of Usher because 1, I want to read poe, 2, i hear it cited all the time, and best of all 3, I really have no idea what it's about so I am spoiler-free. Plus, short, and free. Is this acceptable to the group? Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:44 PM (bhepQ) Saw the film many years ago. Creepy stuff. Would be game for the boom.

Posted by: Hawkins1701 at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (m9HtY)

176 though I don't know if i can get through dickens. I think you[d like Nicholas Nickelby, Ace. Some of his books are not really funny, but that has some good light funny stuff. Given the grim couple of weeks maybe we could all use some humor?. Of course, it's long. Or how about a "Confederation or Confederacy? of Dunces"? Is that the title? People have always recommending it and I have never read it

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (OSs/l)

177 Oddly, I am part-way through both Dracula and The Vision of the Annointed. Of course, I am also part-way through 3 other books, too.

Posted by: LochLomondFarms at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (vEYcI)

178 @162.... Dreadnaught...  have that too and haven't gotten to it..

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (e7T6D)

179 If you're going to read Ulysses read the good one.

Posted by: Lord Tennyson at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (HhHk8)

180

"Putting People First: How We All Can Change America"

by Govenor William Clinton and Senator Al Gore 

Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 01:47 PM (W6iIX)

181 Usher it is!! Slightly over 7,000 words. Read it online at Gutenberg for free: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/932/932-h/932-h.htm

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (7zeA4)

182 *game for the book Although "boom" would make it a cool band name.

Posted by: Hawkins1701 at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (m9HtY)

183 Extraordinary delusions ... This is pretty long. Might want to limit it to selected chapters. Maybe the Tulip bubble and witch burnings. Agreed, but also the South Seas Bubble. However, Mackay offers an excellent explanation of The Crusades that most people would learn a lot from.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (ye7KB)

184 Moby Dick isn't worth it unless you're into sailing ships and whales and boring wandering writing. I like Daniel Defoe's 'A Journal of the Plague Year'.

Posted by: Old Hob at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (ZufZo)

185 Of there's anyone more overestimated than Toni Morrison, it's this guy. Every school in the country makes kids read it. Mine were astonished that I'd read it, and was underwhelmed. Posted by: pep at June 30, 2015 06:39 PM (LAe3v) --His description of the Austronesian expansion was brisk and informative. It is not a bad book, just falls short of historical explanations.

Posted by: logprof USA!! at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (JVgzo)

186 You would have people scouring eBay for the books but the OG Occult Detective Jules de Grandin series would be pretty sweet

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (SyKbw)

187 >>>I dunno. It's short, but really, is there that much to say about it? i have no idea! I don't know what it's about! (I assume it involves a House, a family named Usher, and a fall of some sort.)

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (bhepQ)

188 O.K. I'll go with the "Fall Of the House of Usher". haven't read it in a while.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:48 PM (OSs/l)

189 Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 06:45 PM (e7T6D)

That was exactly my experience too!

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 30, 2015 01:49 PM (Zu3d9)

190 OK, well now that that's been resolved... new thread, or just.... kind of kick the ground and look at our shoes?

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:49 PM (AkOaV)

191 I think A Tale of Two Cities is the easiest Dickens to read. Certainly the most emotional ending of any of his books.

Posted by: Buckeye Katie at June 30, 2015 01:49 PM (1M/xn)

192 Why would anyone read Joyce?

Posted by: Garrett at June 30, 2015 01:50 PM (p0KI9)

193 Actually, there's a lot to talk about vis a vis "Usher". It does not follow a standard story format in a lot of ways.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 01:50 PM (7zeA4)

194 Until last week I had no idea The Postman was a book, too! I asked if Tom Petty was in it..

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:50 PM (ye7KB)

195 We do politics all day every day (even the weekends, now). Stick with the classics. I'd be more than happy to reread Call Of The Wild. Or even Huck Finn.

Posted by: steak ordering Dad at June 30, 2015 01:50 PM (zc45R)

196 Terry Pratchett - Guards, Guards or Hogfather (I could list a dozen, but those are standouts to me) Satire in a fantasy setting, which puts some people off. But Pratchett has a fantastic, cynical grasp of the human condition, a keen mind for moral principle and is a comic genius wordsmith.

Posted by: f2000 at June 30, 2015 01:51 PM (ZqGAN)

197 I read a book one time. It was pretty good.

Posted by: Joe Biden at June 30, 2015 01:51 PM (YFw5T)

198 I've still got a copy of Uncle Remus!  FTW! 

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 01:51 PM (e7T6D)

199 Books I've been meaning to get to, according to my Goodreads account: The Prince, by That Italian Dude The Road to Serfdom, by That Austrian Dude John Adams, by David McCullough The Wealth of Nations, by Adam Smith Democracy in America, by That French Dude The Annals (heh heh) of Imperial Rome, by Tacitus (aka "That Roman Dude") Gulag, A History, by Anne Applebaum The Jungle Books, by Kipling oh, and like sixty more--I'll stop writing

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (VAsIq)

200 165 >>122 Josey Wales... What a flick! Posted by: Garrett at June 30, 2015 06:45 PM (p0KI9) --Endeavour to persevere.

Posted by: logprof USA!! at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (JVgzo)

201 - Civilisation: Kenneth Clarke There's a companion book to the BBC series. The BBC series is available on YouTube. Captain Sir Richard Francis Burton: Wall-to-wall fuck-all ... the guy was a-mazing. My favorite part: He over heard some expedition porters plotting to kill him and take the stuff. So, during a break in the march, Burton buried a small cask of gun powder under where they built their cooking fire. Ka-boom. I'll give a shout-out for Hemingway's short stories. _

Posted by: BumperStickerist at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (0MJOU)

202 Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:48 PM (bhepQ)

Gothic horror....with volcanoes of course.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (Zu3d9)

203 >Why would anyone read Joyce?

Because his short stories and "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" are good. Ulysses is up to taste. Finnegan's Wake is up to how badly you want to be able to tell people you read it.

Posted by: kartoffel at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (fVxXv)

204 Bill Buckley's stupid son wrote a book that I found very amusing, I admit. God Is My Broker.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (ye7KB)

205 Usher would be interesting to me. What about a Philip Roth novel at some point?

Posted by: rrpjr at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (s/yC1)

206 For Hayek, I preferred "The Constitution of Liberty" over "Road to Serfdom", but it's a hefty book.

Posted by: f2000 at June 30, 2015 01:52 PM (ZqGAN)

207 Can we do something that's been on Wishbone so I can pretend to have read it? I suggest we start with the "Pawloined Paper". I love Poe.

Posted by: [/i][/b]andycanuck[/s][/u] at June 30, 2015 01:53 PM (kivUY)

208 "Why would anyone read Joyce?" No one reads Joyce. Some people pretend they read Joyce and say they really like it so they can be better than you.

Posted by: Cloyd Freud, Unemployed at June 30, 2015 01:53 PM (YFw5T)

209 Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 06:52 PM (ye7KB) Thank You For Smoking was a very funny book. I would recommend it. Way better than the movie.

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 01:53 PM (AkOaV)

210 Always wanted to read some John Cheaver.

Posted by: George Costanza at June 30, 2015 01:53 PM (p0KI9)

211 >>>Actually, there's a lot to talk about vis a vis "Usher". It does not follow a standard story format in a lot of ways. per wikipedia -- all I dared read, because I did not want to be spoiled -- it's poe's foremost example of "totality," where every detail is precisely chosen. I don't know what that means, but it's all very exciting!!!

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:53 PM (bhepQ)

212 28.  I always want to read Poe.

I love "The Tell-Tale Heart."  It's creepy yet satisfying, written from the point of view of a mad man.

Posted by: California Girl at June 30, 2015 01:54 PM (l+qoZ)

213 Ace: When you said "The Fall of the House of Usher" is short, did you mean, like really short? If so, it's here (gutenberg . org) and totally free - tinyurl.com/oo9e4ul

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 01:54 PM (yckiS)

214 I've been thinking of reading The Chosen (Chaim Potok). I read it eons ago when I was a wee lass. I think I'd get more out of it today. Embarrassed to say that I've never read The Screwtape Letters. Probably most of you have.

Posted by: Y-not at June 30, 2015 01:54 PM (RWGcK)

215 191 I think A Tale of Two Cities is the easiest Dickens to read. Certainly the most emotional ending of any of his books. Posted by: Buckeye Katie at June 30, 2015 06:49 PM (1M/xn) 'Twas a far, far better deed than I have ever done and a far better butt-kicking than I have ever butt-kicked!!

Posted by: Frazier Crane at June 30, 2015 01:54 PM (JVgzo)

216 This is very exciting! ---- Easy there big fella.

Posted by: SH at June 30, 2015 01:54 PM (gmeXX)

217 my son is named huckleberry after huckleberry finn......my mother was not impressed.....neither was the hospital registrar......the priest who baptized him said it was a great name and we could use a st. huckleberry in the church........it's a great book by a great author.....

i'm still on the lot 49.....i'm going to finish read a couple pages today.....maybe by next year i'll be done.

i vote for Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court........that is a great book....the visuals are outstanding

Posted by: phoenixgirl, i was born a rebel at June 30, 2015 01:54 PM (0O7c5)

218 A brief read is "The Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Anyhow, I'm fine with whatever ace and the horde choose.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 01:54 PM (FsuaD)

219 I kinda always wanted to read Barbarians At The Gate because I found the hbo movie so entertaining. I don't know if I'd still enjoy it, today..

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (ye7KB)

220 Pudd'nhead Wilson was my favorite Mark Twain book. A surprise ending, and a scathing indictment of slavery. Plus it's very funny.

Posted by: Buckeye Katie at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (1M/xn)

221 Sorry. I don't speak Austronesian.

Posted by: president o'bumbles at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (kivUY)

222 Leave Your Tears in Moscow - Barbara Armonas Long out of print - I still have an original hard cover somewhere - but, has been reprinted in 2011 in hard cover. Kindle version - 4.99 Every fucking brain-dead, Millennial, Obama-voting, participation trophy, special snowflake, 3/4 retarded, POS needs to read it.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (CFcIt)

223
My Unimpeded Journey to the White House!

-by Chrispy Christie

Posted by: Chrispy Christie at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (P330y)

224 I received a book with a lot of Poe's short stories for Christmas when I was a child.  Fall of the House of Usher was one of the stories in that book but it has been so long ago I don not remember what it was about.  I do remember almost all of them were good reads. So that could be a good choice for me.  Especially if it is available on Gutenberg for free.

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (GpgJl)

225 Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler. It seems relevant.

Posted by: Northernlurker at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (Sf7oH)

226 Hard Luck Hank: Screw the Galaxy
very funny book, the Audiobook is really good

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (cgeHX)

227 ynot

i have picked up the chosen so many times and i just can't get into it....i would love to read it...i've stopped before i'm 100 pages in.......

Posted by: phoenixgirl, i was born a rebel at June 30, 2015 01:55 PM (0O7c5)

228 Posted by: phoenixgirl, i was born a rebel at June 30, 2015 06:54 PM (0O7c5) His name is "Huck"? That rhymes with... heh.heh.heh

Posted by: Beavis and Butthead at June 30, 2015 01:56 PM (AkOaV)

229 Why would anyone read Joyce? Posted by: Garrett To prove you're better than other people, duh.

Posted by: University English Departments at June 30, 2015 01:56 PM (VAsIq)

230 His name is "Huck"? That rhymes with...

heh.heh.heh

Posted by: Beavis and Butthead at June 30, 2015 06:56 PM (AkOaV)


heh heh....i know......when he's in trouble..........

Posted by: phoenixgirl, i was born a rebel at June 30, 2015 01:57 PM (0O7c5)

231 I'd once again suggest if you do political books "Worshipping the state." By Ben Wiker. No political per se, but always relevant is After Virtue by Alasdair MacIntyre.

Posted by: tsrblke, PhD(c) rogue bioethicst[/i] [/b] [/s] at June 30, 2015 01:57 PM (s92xH)

232 "How to Fight Fight Fight for the Presidency" by Mitt Romney and John McCain

Posted by: Kensington (@NYKensington) at June 30, 2015 01:57 PM (7Kbxu)

233 Nothing that has been said here hasn't already been said in Jonah Goldberg's "Liberal Fascism"

Posted by: Slapweasel (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i][/b][/u][/s] at June 30, 2015 01:57 PM (OQ9R7)

234 >>>Ace: When you said "The Fall of the House of Usher" is short, did you mean, like really short? yes it's a short story. However, it is apparently very dense with detail and implication, so it will read slow.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 01:57 PM (bhepQ)

235 If anyone wants a short and very amusing piece to read I highly recommend Mark Twain's Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses in which he gives it to the author of Last Of The Mohicans and gives it to him real good.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:58 PM (ye7KB)

236 It takes a certain sophistication to read and "get" Joyce.

Posted by: Dr Spank at June 30, 2015 01:58 PM (TJCSB)

237 One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Huck Finn Lonesome Dove Princess Bride (really. It's a masterpiece) One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is very germane to today's world. Most important novel of the latter half of the 20th century, IMHO

Posted by: MaxMBJ at June 30, 2015 01:58 PM (Uq9ly)

238 Nuke the Krauts!

Posted by: logprof USA!!! at June 30, 2015 01:58 PM (JVgzo)

239 i have picked up the chosen so many times and i just can't get into it....i would love to read it...i've stopped before i'm 100 pages in....... --- Some books are like that. I glanced at a few pages just now and it seems readable enough, but I don't remember much from my first reading of it. I think it'd have more meaning to me now.

Posted by: Y-not at June 30, 2015 01:58 PM (RWGcK)

240 The True Believer, by Eric Hoffer. May have been suggested already. Short, clear, and very, very appropriate to what's going on these days.

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (unjBv)

241 And as far as uplifting book I'd highly recommend "7 Men and the Secreat of their Greatness" by Eric Metaxas. O course most of them are Christian, but their lives are of service,heroism and integrity are just inspiring. Metaxas also has a great book on Bonhoeffer.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (OSs/l)

242 To satisfy everyone, may I suggest.... Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (VAsIq)

243 Would anyone be interested in getting into anything by C. S. Lewis in the future?

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (FsuaD)

244 "Finnegan's Wake is up to how badly you want to be able to tell people you read it. " I go to my grave believing that he wrote that book to screw with critics and see how far he could push things with them. Portrait of the Artist is legitimately good though.

Posted by: Lauren at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (MYCIw)

245 In fact, I wish Twain was alive today to rip apart Georrge Marrtin. Are we ever gonna discuss the last season of Game Of Thrones? WHAT THE HELL??

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (ye7KB)

246

"The Hunt for Red October"

 

or is that too easy to pick up?

Posted by: Yo! at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (W6iIX)

247 Help, I've fallen and I can't get up!

Posted by: Roderick Usher at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (oVJmc)

248 All of Poe's short stories. Especially important: Masque of the Red Death.

Posted by: MaxMBJ at June 30, 2015 01:59 PM (Uq9ly)

249 Eight Reasons Why I'm Not Gay by Lindsey Graham

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 02:00 PM (8ZskC)

250 We should have a moron meet-up at Poe's grave. 

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:00 PM (FsuaD)

251 Amen to Pride and Prejudice. It's actually very satirical and bitingly sarcastic.

Posted by: MaxMBJ at June 30, 2015 02:01 PM (Uq9ly)

252 It takes a certain sophistication to read and "get" Joyce. Posted by: Dr Spank I get him. "I'm smart--look how smart I am! Look at what a good, clever writer I am! If you don't notice how good my writing is you must be dumb! Can't you tell I labored over every effing word in this book!?"

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:01 PM (VAsIq)

253 Jane D'Oh--I'd like to read Screwtape. MaxMBJ--First detective story? G*dd*amned em-dashes.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 02:01 PM (7zeA4)

254
Bob Dole's Enlightened Encounter With Viagra

-by Bob Dole

Posted by: Bob Dole at June 30, 2015 02:01 PM (P330y)

255 "Von Ryan's Express" is a solid POW escape story. It's way different than the movie. "A Distant Mirror" by Barbara Tuchmann is a terrific read. It's about 14th Century France and follows the events of the century through the true story of a noble who was present at pretty much everything. A Distant Mirror falls well within the D&D / History buff / Franco-phile wheelhouse.

Posted by: BumperStickerist at June 30, 2015 02:01 PM (0MJOU)

256 Would anyone be interested in getting into anything by C. S. Lewis in the future? Posted by: Jane D'oh Yes.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:01 PM (VAsIq)

257 >>>All of Poe's short stories. Especially important: Masque of the Red Death. it's great, but i've read that a bunch of times, and fairly recently too.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:01 PM (bhepQ)

258 Moneyball

Posted by: MaxMBJ at June 30, 2015 02:02 PM (Uq9ly)

259 A brief read is "The Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 06:54 PM ________ Looking for "Just Lather, That's All" by Hernando Tellez. It's out there somewhere. Good stuff.

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 02:02 PM (yckiS)

260 Read everything by Ben Coes. Great stuff, you won't be disappointed.

Posted by: Franky Tuma at June 30, 2015 02:02 PM (3S5It)

261 Retief's War by Keith Laumer. Actually damn near any of the Retief books are good for a lighthearted read.

Posted by: Bosk at June 30, 2015 02:02 PM (n2K+4)

262 >>> Jane D'Oh--I'd like to read Screwtape. i'd like to read that one too.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:02 PM (bhepQ)

263
Boffing the GWU Debate Team

-by Sandra Fluke

Posted by: Sandra Fluke at June 30, 2015 02:02 PM (P330y)

264 someone mentioned Lord Dunsany; I've tried, I just don't get it.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:02 PM (bhepQ)

265 Especially important: Masque of the Red Death. Posted by: MaxMBJ at June 30, 2015 06:59 PM (Uq9ly) Agree.

Posted by: rrpjr at June 30, 2015 02:03 PM (s/yC1)

266 US Germany womens World Cup Soccer

Posted by: Nevergiveup at June 30, 2015 02:03 PM (/tNwW)

267 Usher's my homie. I sung a duet with him once. But Miley's come out as bisexual. Usher and I are not bisexual.

Posted by: Justin Bieber at June 30, 2015 02:03 PM (6qR/9)

268 MaxMBJ--it's not Austin's greatest work but "Northhanger Abbey" (referenced by HP Lovecraft in his "Horror and the Supernaturual in Literature") is a hoot--a total send-up of the gothic horrors of Mrs. Radclife and Horace Walpole. Which sort of limits its appeal today. But still.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 02:03 PM (7zeA4)

269 Would anyone be interested in getting into anything by C. S. Lewis in the future? Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 06:59 PM (FsuaD) If people want something short, "Screwtape Proposes the Toast" is very good, and a quick read-- fifteen or twenty pages.

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 02:03 PM (unjBv)

270 Poe is great. Love all his stories. His poems aren't bad either.

Posted by: TrivialPursuer at June 30, 2015 02:03 PM (kGrdk)

271 >>>240 The True Believer, by Eric Hoffer. May have been suggested already. i want to read this one. Maybe do this one next, instead of VotA?

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (bhepQ)

272 What about a graphic novel like "Maus"?

Posted by: Kensington (@NYKensington) at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (7Kbxu)

273 My homey's in danger! Did he evacuate the hizzouse?

Posted by: Justin Bieber at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (6qR/9)

274
My Encounter With a Giant Caterpillar

-by Rachel Corrie

Posted by: Rachel Corrie at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (P330y)

275 So, how does this work again?

Posted by: Dr Spank at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (TJCSB)

276 252 It takes a certain sophistication to read and "get" Joyce. Posted by: Dr Spank I get him. "I'm smart--look how smart I am! Look at what a good, clever writer I am! If you don't notice how good my writing is you must be dumb! Can't you tell I labored over every effing word in this book!?" Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 07:01 PM (VAsIq) I call extremely difficult putts "James Joyce's", since they're impossible to read. Democracy in Americaby Alexis de Tocqueville would be my book club suggestion, as would Brave New World.

Posted by: SARDiver at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (DzJBg)

277 CS Lewis is another great author who offers great insight of the human condition.

Posted by: Soothsayer's Lovin Spoonful at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (ye7KB)

278 Moby Dick is one of the handful of classics that I've actually read and I don't remember it being a slog.  I had done a little seafaring so maybe that made it more relate-able.  I'm a terrible novel reader because my mind tends to wander easily after awhile but I don't recall having that problem with Moby Dick.

Posted by: Hobo with a laptop at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (ljAhW)

279 Yay Poe!!! Frankenstein by Mary Shelley is also great

Posted by: ginaswo at June 30, 2015 02:04 PM (+kfYT)

280 Agreed on CS Lewis.  Have the space trilogy... only read the first one so far... great for discussions and whatnot I'm sure.

Posted by: Yip at June 30, 2015 02:05 PM (e7T6D)

281 I'd also love to re-read some Hemingway.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:05 PM (FsuaD)

282 How To Succeed in Life Without Really Trying.

Posted by: Barky McDipshit at June 30, 2015 02:05 PM (JVgzo)

283 250 We should have a moron meet-up at Poe's grave.  Posted by: Jane D'oh Baltimore? No thanks. May the Poe House in Richmond...

Posted by: steak ordering Dad at June 30, 2015 02:05 PM (zc45R)

284
Why the WNBA is not Ghey!

-The WNBA Legal Team

Posted by: WNBA Legal Team at June 30, 2015 02:05 PM (P330y)

285 For next time: http://tinyurl.com/o2urq5c Bruce Catton's "A Stillness at Appomattox." The guys at Powerline recommended it as perhaps the best narrative history ever written. I would be hard pressed to find fault in their assessment. It is absolutely lyrical in places. But not flowery. If I were king of the world, I would have this book adapted to a Netflix series. Plus, it is somewhat topical being a Civil War history. You will enjoy it immensely.

Posted by: ObjectionSustained at June 30, 2015 02:06 PM (/vphp)

286 9 Shelby Foote's "The Civil War" seems timely since we appear to be refighting it. Posted by: Wyatt's Torch at June 30, 2015 06:22 PM (DeqSC) That's about 3000 pages, and dry reading. It took me 4 years to get through it. I'm game to discuss it.

Posted by: SARDiver at June 30, 2015 02:06 PM (DzJBg)

287 Nothing that has been said here hasn't already been said in Jonah Goldberg's "Liberal Fascism" Posted by: Slapweasel (Cold1) (T) at June 30, 2015 06:57 PM ________ By "here" you mean the blog proper and not the comments, right?

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 02:06 PM (yckiS)

288 How about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, and "The Hound of the Baskervilles?" Short, simple, easy to read. And a window into a bygone era: Country doctors that walk to house calls, butlers, damsels in distress.

Posted by: LochLomondFarms at June 30, 2015 02:06 PM (vEYcI)

289 AP Source: US, Cuba to announce opening of embassies on Wednesday

Posted by: Nevergiveup at June 30, 2015 02:06 PM (/tNwW)

290 >>236 It takes a certain sophistication to read and "get" Joyce. I'd rather slam my dick in a car door than read another page of his shit.

Posted by: George Costanza at June 30, 2015 02:06 PM (p0KI9)

291
Why My Feminine Self is so Desirable!

-by Caitlyn Jenner

Posted by: Caitlyn Jenner at June 30, 2015 02:07 PM (P330y)

292 " i'd like to read that one too. " Screwtape is definitely a great intro into C.S. Lewis and an enjoyable, if depressing, read.

Posted by: Lauren at June 30, 2015 02:07 PM (MYCIw)

293 Encyclopedia Brown stories. My guess is that the Moron Horde would solve about 75% of them. dKos, BuzzFeed, HA commenters about 22%.

Posted by: BumperStickerist at June 30, 2015 02:07 PM (0MJOU)

294 Someone upthread mentioned CS Lewis. How about "The Screwtape Letters?"

Posted by: LochLomondFarms at June 30, 2015 02:07 PM (vEYcI)

295 Usher sounds good. I don't remember reading it, but other Poe works were good, so...great.

Posted by: Mama AJ at June 30, 2015 02:07 PM (0xTsz)

296 Posted by: LochLomondFarms at June 30, 2015 07:06 PM (vEYcI) Good call.

Posted by: Beavis and Butthead at June 30, 2015 02:07 PM (AkOaV)

297 oops. /sock

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 02:08 PM (AkOaV)

298 "Miracle At Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention" is a work of historical non-fiction, written by Catherine Drinker Bowen and originally published in 1966. This book changed my life in college. Even though you know the ending, it reads like a political thriller. Like you were there. That book and "Wealth and Poverty" by George Gilder formed the basis of my conservative beliefs. I have never read "The Road to Serfdom" , and I know I should, so maybe that would complete my personal trilogy. Also the book called "The First American" about Ben Franklin was the best book I've read in the last ten years.

Posted by: Buckeye Katie at June 30, 2015 02:08 PM (1M/xn)

299 Poe's "the Gold Bug" was racist! All his books should therefore be destroyed, like the Confederate Flag. I forbid the reading of FotHoU.

Posted by: Al Sharpton at June 30, 2015 02:08 PM (6qR/9)

300
Dr Jill Biden's Sexual Proclivities

-by Joe Biden

Posted by: Joe Biden at June 30, 2015 02:08 PM (P330y)

301 i've never read alice in wonderland.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:08 PM (bhepQ)

302 Why would anyone read Joyce? Posted by: Garrett at June 30, 2015 06:50 PM (p0KI9) My son is an avid reader. He read Ulysses. Says it's one of the best books he ever read. I tried. Lord knows I tried. I am naturally bent toward ADD so you can guess things went.

Posted by: ObjectionSustained at June 30, 2015 02:08 PM (/vphp)

303 I'm ashamed to say I actually slogged through some Joyce back in my high-and-mighty mouthy liberal days.

Bored me to shit, but I was *so proud* to tell everyone I'd read him.

If only I could retrieve those lost, boring, brain-dulling hours.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:09 PM (FsuaD)

304 Achieving Wealth Through Choosing the Right Uterus by Chelsea Clinton

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 02:09 PM (8ZskC)

305 99 cents for Kindle.

Posted by: Mama AJ at June 30, 2015 02:09 PM (0xTsz)

306 SockOFF

Posted by: Garrett at June 30, 2015 02:09 PM (p0KI9)

307
My Beautiful Self

-by Hussein Obama

Posted by: Hussein Obama at June 30, 2015 02:09 PM (P330y)

308 >>>How about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, and "The Hound of the Baskervilles?" Short, simple, easy to read. And a window into a bygone era: Country doctors that walk to house calls, butlers, damsels in distress. i'd be game, have not read it, always up for Holmes but isn't that a full-length novel?

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:09 PM (bhepQ)

309 I'm trying to read Ulysses (Joyce's) right now. I have no clue what is going on. I literally read pages of it and it just seems like words in a blender, sentences which (when I can actually parse them) seem unrelated to the sentences before or after. Then I'll get to a paragraph or two which I actually understand, and feel like I've accomplished something. Then it's back to the blender.

Posted by: is this some kind of elaborate Irish joke? at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (HQyvY)

310 I think we can take out these Krauts!

Posted by: logprof: USA at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (JVgzo)

311 "Annotated Alice" - Alice in Wonderland with all the cool stuff foot-noted so you understand it.

Posted by: BumperStickerist at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (0MJOU)

312 i've never read alice in wonderland. Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 07:08 PM (bhepQ) Just take the ride at Disneyland. It will tell you all you need to know.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (8ZskC)

313 "Bored of the Rings" - the Tolkein-inspired book that will finaly lay waste to the trilogiphilia of Peter Jackson.

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) [/b] [/i] [/s] at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (95CzI)

314 Resist We Much: The True Story of Raysis Rooftop Koreans and a Rogue's Gallery of Various Butt-Pirates

Posted by: Al Sharpton at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (YFw5T)

315 "Putting People First: HowWe All Can Change America"
by Govenor William Clinton and Senator Al Gore

--

What ranks higher you say?  Barry Williams' Growing Up Brady.

Posted by: Lady in Black at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (0u3uY)

316 Poe!
This calls for a glass of amontillado.

or some port. I will have some port on hand next Sunday.


May I recommend that when Ace picks a book, he also picks a drink to accompany? Or is value rite the only drink required.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (LWu6U)

317 >>> 99 cents for Kindle. someone must have a free version; it's public domain.

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (bhepQ)

318 When done reading The Fall of the House of Usher, make sure you watch the Vincent Price movie

Posted by: Ken at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (FQMPG)

319 If you want a nice, neat short novel, may I recommend something by Louis L'Amour?  His western novels are about men who are men and how they did the right thing even through excruciating circumstances.  The women in the books are also strong yet comely.  Maybe "The Daybreakers" or "Sackett."

Posted by: California Girl at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (l+qoZ)

320 250 We should have a moron meet-up at Poe's grave.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:00 PM (FsuaD)


Baltimore?

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 02:10 PM (GpgJl)

321 i want to read this one. Maybe do this one next, instead of VotA? Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 07:04 PM (bhepQ) It's an interesting period piece as well. Written in 1951, I think, so the West still hadn't gotten the full, real picture of what Stalin and Friends were up to. He makes much use of the Nazis and Hitler as prime examples of how this stuff happens, and I think it's just as well; Hitler knew a thing or two about motivating mass movements, after all.

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 02:11 PM (unjBv)

322 alice in wonderland would be a good one

Posted by: phoenixgirl, i was born a rebel at June 30, 2015 02:11 PM (0O7c5)

323 'Under the Vocano', I'd like to read that again.

Posted by: Garrett at June 30, 2015 02:11 PM (p0KI9)

324
Designing my Personal Pink Sybian

-by S E Cupp

Posted by: S E Cupp at June 30, 2015 02:11 PM (P330y)

325 ""Bored of the Rings" - the Tolkein-inspired book that will finaly lay waste to the trilogiphilia of Peter Jackson. " Ah! The Stealthy Green Toupees!

Posted by: Y-not at June 30, 2015 02:11 PM (RWGcK)

326 Try something a little unusual. One of my favorite novellas is Typhoon, by Joseph Conrad. It is about what makes a good commander. It is one of the most perfectly executed stories I have ever read. Much of it is drawn from Conrad's own experiences as a sea captain, and he knows whereof he speaks, an unusual quality in a writer... Anyway, Joseph Conrad is one of the most conservative writers you are likely to encounter in English literature. And one of the best storytellers. Another book by him you might try is The Secret Agent, which looks into the mind of a terrorist, and terrorist cells and structures, and how they operate in perfect harmony with polite society...

Posted by: eric at June 30, 2015 02:11 PM (OH6Vr)

327 ...how things went... Good Lord.

Posted by: ObjectionSustained at June 30, 2015 02:12 PM (/vphp)

328 Thomas Sowell has another good book, Conflict of Visions, which is also quite good I think.

Posted by: chemjeff at June 30, 2015 02:12 PM (2ap0X)

329 309 I'm trying to read Ulysses (Joyce's) right now. I have no clue what is going on. I literally read pages of it and it just seems like words in a blender, sentences which (when I can actually parse them) seem unrelated to the sentences before or after. Then I'll get to a paragraph or two which I actually understand, and feel like I've accomplished something. Then it's back to the blender. Posted by: is this some kind of elaborate Irish joke? at June 30, 2015 07:10 PM (HQyvY) Sounds waaaaay more coherent than our average ONT...

Posted by: Krebs v Carnot: Epic Battle of the Cycling Stars (TM) [/b] [/i] [/s] at June 30, 2015 02:12 PM (95CzI)

330 fall of the house of usher? ok.....i can re read that one!  poe is awesome

Posted by: phoenixgirl, i was born a rebel at June 30, 2015 02:12 PM (0O7c5)

331 Jimmy Carter: Obamas Foreign Policy Accomplishments Minimal The old pot kettle black thing

Posted by: Nevergiveup at June 30, 2015 02:12 PM (/tNwW)

332 op cit: Bored of the Rings. The Horde could go Meta and read all the comments of a selected post by ace. For Breitbart.

Posted by: BumperStickerist at June 30, 2015 02:13 PM (0MJOU)

333 320 250
We should have a moron meet-up at Poe's grave.


Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:00 PM (FsuaD)

Baltimore?

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 07:10 PM (GpgJl)



I have an ancestor buried there who was actually married to Napoleon Bonaparte's brother, Jerome.  She gave birth to the only American Bonaparte, before Napoleon summoned his brother home and made him divorce her. 

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:13 PM (FsuaD)

334 -by S E Cupp Posted by: S E Cupp at June 30, 2015 07:11 PM (P330y) I heard the movie was better

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 02:13 PM (unjBv)

335 >>i'd be game, have not read it, always up for Holmes Right back at you, Little Buddy.

Posted by: Zombie John Holmes at June 30, 2015 02:13 PM (p0KI9)

336 >>someone must have a free version; it's public domain. Link to Gutenberg version in comment 181. I checked Amazon just to see if it was free and it's so cheap I might just click it.

Posted by: Mama AJ at June 30, 2015 02:14 PM (0xTsz)

337 I love Wonderland/Looking Glass; beyond the absurdities, they are highly cerebral. (And kind of off-putting for some.) I remember "Baskervilles" as a novella. It's not very long for sure. All this stuff: Doyle, Carroll, Poe...Free on Gutenberg with multiple file formats.

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 02:14 PM (7zeA4)

338 The Autobiography of Loyola.

Posted by: Iblis at June 30, 2015 02:14 PM (9221z)

339 Huckleberry Finn.

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:14 PM (n3Sbm)

340 I also would recommend Churchill's "The Gathering Storm." Again, a historical read that has a lot of present day application. And even though it can be weighty, full of original source materials, it is very readable and goes down like a fine scotch. So I am told.

Posted by: ObjectionSustained at June 30, 2015 02:14 PM (/vphp)

341 Great choice. Found the whole text online for free already. I have it bookmarked. I love Poe's "The Raven", it's so musical, melancholy, and haunting, so I look forward to being "nudged" to read more.

Posted by: Aslan's Girl at June 30, 2015 02:15 PM (xetep)

342 "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Universe" anyone? I downloaded a free copy of Poe's horror stories for free on kindle.

Posted by: lindafell de Spair at June 30, 2015 02:15 PM (+P27u)

343 339 Huckleberry Finn. Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 07:14 PM (n3Sbm) ...would require too many trigger warnings

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 02:15 PM (AkOaV)

344 I demand an edition of Alice in Wonderland/Alice Through The Looking Glass in which they're all black, including the rabbit.

Posted by: Al Sharpton at June 30, 2015 02:15 PM (6qR/9)

345 The Autobiography of Loyola. Oh. I read "Lolita."

Posted by: Roman Polanski at June 30, 2015 02:16 PM (8ZskC)

346 Poe's works are overinflated.

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:16 PM (n3Sbm)

347 All this stuff: Doyle, Carroll, Poe...Free on Gutenberg with multiple file formats. I think Amazon had the Complete Sherlock Holmes for free for Kindle. They also have the John Carter series too.

Posted by: Iblis at June 30, 2015 02:16 PM (9221z)

348 "She gave birth to the only American Bonaparte, before Napoleon summoned his brother home and made him divorce her." Shit, it was the Dauphine!

Posted by: Huck Finn at June 30, 2015 02:16 PM (YFw5T)

349 Why did I read that as Ace in Wonderland?

Posted by: eyes glazing over from reading Ulysses at June 30, 2015 02:16 PM (HQyvY)

350 It's 7000 words, so it's just a short story, a mere tenth of a novel, and it's free on Kindle (and B&N, I assume). So you're saying it's like a really, really short Ewok Movie Review. Good to know.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at June 30, 2015 02:17 PM (+OXwX)

351 I demand an edition of Alice in Wonderland/Alice Through The Looking Glass in which they're all black, including the rabbit. Posted by: Al Sharpton The rabbit was black? That would explain why the cops were after him.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:17 PM (VAsIq)

352 Oh. I read "Lolita." Posted by: Roman Polanski I call it Treasure Island.

Posted by: Jeffery Epstein at June 30, 2015 02:17 PM (tgnRB)

353 If we want to understand the current intellectual zeitgeist, and to walk way infuriated, there is always "Infinite Jest" by David Foster Wallace.

Posted by: ObjectionSustained at June 30, 2015 02:18 PM (/vphp)

354 Fafherd and the Grey Mouser. _ For the Children.

Posted by: BumperStickerist at June 30, 2015 02:18 PM (0MJOU)

355 I would highly recommend Dracula, which I read for the first time just a couple of years ago. Next to The Ruins, it is the scariest novel I have ever read. The writing has a surprisingly modern feel to it.

Posted by: NCC at June 30, 2015 02:18 PM (F8Iv/)

356 Is Vincent Price in the book version?

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:18 PM (n3Sbm)

357 I've been watching (and am addicted to) "A Place to Call Home" by Aussie Deborah Smith on PBS.

The show is incredible.  Move over boring Downton Abby.  I am literally barely able to wait for the next installment. 

I'm curious how her book reads.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:18 PM (FsuaD)

358 'Rochele, Rochele' is a fetching read.

Posted by: George Costanza at June 30, 2015 02:19 PM (p0KI9)

359 Usher is either a Vincent Price tales from the crypt or an incredibly deep metaphor for Poe's cosmology an yes i mean cosmology : The physics of vibrations and split halves seeking to resolve into unity . To wit " If ever a man had painted a picture of an idea , it was Roderick Usher " As an entry into Poe's mind , it works quite well and Poe's mind was a trip . You also might like his " The Philosophy of Furniture " . And BTW for those of us in apocalyptic mode Mac Carthy's Blood Meridian rocks .

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at June 30, 2015 02:20 PM (uvj0z)

360 What about "The Liberty Amendments" by Mark Levin. We could have a quality Article V Convention discussion. It gets bandied about, but the dreams, nightmares and limitations should be discussed rationally. ...One might 'follow it up' by actually reading Article V of the Constitution.

Posted by: Slapweasel (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i][/b][/u][/s] at June 30, 2015 02:20 PM (OQ9R7)

361 So, have we decided yet?

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 02:20 PM (GpgJl)

362 J'Accuse

Posted by: Emma Sulkowicz at June 30, 2015 02:21 PM (6qR/9)

363 ...One might 'follow it up' by actually reading Article V of the Constitution. That old thing?

Posted by: Ezra Klein at June 30, 2015 02:21 PM (8ZskC)

364 "So, have we decided yet?" I'll let you know when you've decided.

Posted by: Anthony Kennedy at June 30, 2015 02:21 PM (YFw5T)

365 I've been turning a bunch of people on to "Red Rising." Suffers from a bit of a limp beginning, but it's a rousing, ultra masculine, ultra violent space opera. Really, this is not the kind of book anyone writes anymore. Part of a trilogy, soon to be a major motion picture type thing (Mark Forster is attached to direct). It's a very cinematic book. Author love to misdirect the reader and then bust out some killer action set piece.

Posted by: dude guy at June 30, 2015 02:21 PM (q177U)

366 House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski

Posted by: Pastorius at June 30, 2015 02:22 PM (gMAUH)

367 "A Canticle for Leibowitz," by Walter M. Miller Jr.

Posted by: davidt at June 30, 2015 02:22 PM (yYOXd)

368 361 So, have we decided yet? Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 07:20 PM (GpgJl) comment 163

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 02:22 PM (AkOaV)

369 J'Accuse Posted by: Emma Sulkowicz at June 30, 2015 07:21 PM (6qR/9) Not funny.

Posted by: Alfred Dreyfus at June 30, 2015 02:22 PM (8ZskC)

370 J'Accuse Posted by: Emma Sulkowicz at June 30, 2015 07:21 PM (6qR/9) Gesundheit

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at June 30, 2015 02:22 PM (+OXwX)

371 Mark Forster...Machine Gun Preacher...

Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 02:23 PM (7zeA4)

372 I'm trying to read Ulysses (Joyce's) right now. I have no clue what is going on. I literally read pages of it and it just seems like words in a blender, sentences which (when I can actually parse them) seem unrelated to the sentences before or after. Then I'll get to a paragraph or two which I actually understand, and feel like I've accomplished something. Then it's back to the blender. Posted by: is this some kind of elaborate Irish joke? at June 30, 2015 07:10 PM (HQyvY) Supposedly you are supposed to read it as if it were an impressionistic painting. It is a recording of all the senses of a day in the life of the protagonist, and the more you back off the details, the more the book and the narrative comes into focus. I did not have the patience.

Posted by: ObjectionSustained at June 30, 2015 02:23 PM (/vphp)

373 288 How about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes, and "The Hound of the Baskervilles?" Short, simple, easy to read. And a window into a bygone era: Country doctors that walk to house calls, butlers, damsels in distress. Posted by: LochLomondFarms at June 30, 2015 07:06 PM (vEYcI) See? You sOcOnS just want to take us back into the 50's. The hip kids I hang with on my 700 foot yacht, just laugh at you, in their gayness. House calls? Pfffft..... I just bought a hospital this morning as Jeeves was serving me breakfast.

Posted by: Mr. Poo Poo at June 30, 2015 02:23 PM (CFcIt)

374 I guess we can do Old Man and The Sea some other time , esse. http://southpark.cc.com/clips/155575/writing-eses

Posted by: @PeeteySDee at June 30, 2015 02:24 PM (DjII2)

375 Mark Forster...Machine Gun Preacher... Posted by: blake at June 30, 2015 07:23 PM (7zeA4) On the other hand..... Marc Forster....Quantum of Solace

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at June 30, 2015 02:24 PM (+OXwX)

376 >>>If you want a nice, neat short novel, may I recommend something by Louis L'Amour? His western novels are about men who are men and how they did the right thing even through excruciating circumstances. The women in the books are also strong yet comely. Maybe "The Daybreakers" or "Sackett." i'd give that kind of a western a try... but him or zane gray?

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:24 PM (bhepQ)

377 I'm off to watch baseball. -Later, gators.

Posted by: Slapweasel (Cold1) ([b]T[/b]) [/i][/b][/u][/s] at June 30, 2015 02:24 PM (OQ9R7)

378 I'd suggest "The Flying Inn" by Chesterson. It's a fun read while also delving into a lot of issues we face now. An overly vocal minority subjecting common people to their interpretation of progressive values. The elite SJW members of society limiting thought and speech and freedom of will to appease Islamists. And how a few people persevere this oppression and ultimately win. Also a saucy ship captain and his mate racing through the English countryside with a barrel of rum and a giant wheel of cheese. I've read it before but I think I missed a lot of the hidden meanings that Chesterton packs into his works and have been thinking about reading it again because it is so prescient for today and the past week.

Posted by: bananaDream at June 30, 2015 02:24 PM (ZctfO)

379 "A Canticle for Leibowitz," by Walter M. Miller Jr. Posted by: davit "A Cankle for America," by Hillary!

Posted by: Hillary Rodham-Rodham at June 30, 2015 02:25 PM (tgnRB)

380 "The Lathe of Heaven," by Ursula K. LeGuin.

Posted by: davidt at June 30, 2015 02:25 PM (yYOXd)

381 Dracula is my favorite epistolary style novel.

It really is a fun book. After all this queer vampire crap lately, i reread it to see if I could find evidence that the count was light in the loafers, but not a word. I am glad to say thatDracula is straight as Liberace's carpenter.

Posted by: Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest at June 30, 2015 02:25 PM (LWu6U)

382 Personally, I think you should read my new book, Margie's Revenge, about envy and murder in the faculty lounge. Usher's fall will seem mild by comparison.

Posted by: Caliban at June 30, 2015 02:25 PM (3GFMN)

383 >>>House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski I read three quarters of this. I usuall finish a book after getting that far. I have to pick it up again. It's just... well, you know. it's all over the page, isn't it?

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 02:25 PM (bhepQ)

384 doesnt elizabeth warren have a book? we might be able to defeat her presidency if someone actually reads her book. lord knows the MSM wont. How about some kind of crowd-sourcing oppo research from the horde? eh?

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 02:26 PM (AkOaV)

385 I've been turning a bunch of people on. Posted by: dude guy :0

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:27 PM (VAsIq)

386 doesnt elizabeth warren have a book? You're not referring to the one with the yummy Native American crab recipe, are you?

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 02:27 PM (8ZskC)

387 If you want a nice, neat short novel, may I recommend something by Louis L'Amour? His western novels are about men who are men and how they did the right thing even through excruciating circumstances. The women in the books are also strong yet comely. Maybe "The Daybreakers" or "Sackett." i'd give that kind of a western a try... but him or zane gray? Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 07:24 PM (bhepQ) Or Last Of The Breed, which has an interesting take on multiculturalism (the interrogation scene near the beginning of the book).

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at June 30, 2015 02:27 PM (+OXwX)

388 I call it Treasure Island. Posted by: Jeffery Epstein at June 30, 2015 07:17 PM (tgnRB) Spare seat on the next flight?

Posted by: Bill Clinton at June 30, 2015 02:27 PM (CFcIt)

389 You're not referring to the one with the yummy Native American crab recipe, are you? Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2015 07:27 PM (8ZskC) No. At least, I don't think so. Who knows what's in her NY Times best selling book? Guarantee you less than 10 people in America have read her book, and 2 of them were paid to read it.

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (AkOaV)

390 Smoking Tuna in My Sweat Lodge

Posted by: Elizabeth Warren at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (YFw5T)

391 We're used to paying attention to tropes, but watch for schemes in Fall of the House of Usher.  And one in particular: the last half of the book becomes one long, extended sick groan with Poe's use of oo, uh and related phonemes.  It's like the story starts moaning.  Kind of sickening.

Posted by: rdbrewer at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (Iyg03)

392 Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 07:24 PM (bhepQ) L'Armour. His writing it tighter

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (SyKbw)

393 So, what's the decision?  Gotta go serve late husband home our dinner. 


Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (FsuaD)

394 Native Americans have crabs?

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (n3Sbm)

395 376  i'd give that kind of a western a try... but him or zane gray?

Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 07:24 PM (bhepQ)


LL is (was) much better than Zane Grey in both stories and writing style.

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (GpgJl)

396 Just like how it took 4 years in to his presidency for someone to read Obamas book and say, "hey guys! Guess what? Obama ate a dog. A FRICKING DOG!" and other revelations.

Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 02:28 PM (AkOaV)

397 Kraut babes not as hawt as the Americans.

Posted by: logprof: USA! at June 30, 2015 02:29 PM (JVgzo)

398 Posted by: mynewhandle at June 30, 2015 07:26 PM (AkOaV) Yes. It's called "A Fighting Chance" But its Indian name is Sits By Remaindered

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 02:29 PM (unjBv)

399 Arthur and the Lost Kingdoms, by Alexander Moffat
Swords of Exodus, by Larry Correia and Mike Kupari

These are my 2 recent orders from Amazon, the bookstore that doesn't suck or patronize me for my choices. *stares at sole remaining Barnes and Noble in Cincinnati area*

Arthur and the Lost Kingdoms was Moffat's first foray into Scottish history, and the Celtic Fringe in general. It is a short but masterful piece which proposes that Arthur existed, but lived and fought in a place where no one had been previously looking for him. Arthur (per Moffat) was the chosen general for a Romano-British kingdom north of Hadrian's Wall, and the area he defended was part of a larger set of British states speaking a form of Old Welsh that existed up to the first millennium AD. His proofs for this include the linguistics of place-names, Roman military and civic culture, old monastic records, and Old Welsh epic poetry. You will learn a great deal about the so-called Dark Ages in Britain beyond Arthur, who did exist even if he was not a king.

Swords of Exodus is Correia and Kupari's sequel to Dead Six, their first joint novel. (Number 3 might be out by Christmas; Correia is a hard-writing man.) A professional white hat outfit needs the two surviving heroes from Dead Six to help them take down an international rat bastard named Sala JiIhan. The problem is, one is retired and the other is in a secret Federal prison in Montana. Will that stop Exodus from trying to get the two men back together again to achieve their goal? Oh hell no! Correia is the current king of action writing and red-state action heroes, so all AOSHQ dudes should be reading his stuff. 


Posted by: exdem13 at June 30, 2015 02:29 PM (ry4ab)

400 Edmund: A Butler's Tale by E. Blackadder.

A huge, roller coaster of a novel in four hundred sizzling chapters. A searing indictment of domestic servitude in the eighteenth century, with some hot gypsies thrown in.

Posted by: Stu Podaso at June 30, 2015 02:29 PM (mJzia)

401 "Bored of the Rings" - the Tolkein-inspired book that will finaly lay waste to the trilogiphilia of Peter Jackson. Line by line, could be the funniest book ever written. It does require familiarity with Tolkien.

Posted by: rrpjr at June 30, 2015 02:29 PM (s/yC1)

402 Dracula is an amazing book. Ace, you have to finish it. I guarantee that everyone who hasn't read it would be confident they'd be able to guess in three tries how Dracula dies (well, "dispatched," I suppose, since he's dead already), and I guarantee they'd all be wrong. Hint: Once again, Texas is awesome.

Posted by: Doctor Cynic at June 30, 2015 02:29 PM (rzggC)

403 I agree with whoever said Dracula is the scariest novel he or she ever read.

Posted by: Northernlurker at June 30, 2015 02:30 PM (Sf7oH)

404 Ace, First time through, I read it 3/4 of the way too ... even though I really liked it. Recently, I finished it, and I liked it the whole way through to the end. In retrospect, I did get a bit bored there in the middle as the exploration probably just went on a little too long. Thing is, from my skewed perspective, House of Leaves is the best Postmodern novel this side of the Bible. And the best thing about it's "Postmodernism" is that it is a satire of Postmodernism, at the same time as it is a passionate expression of philosophical questions and human emotion in an age of "no truth" and too many truths. Or, that's the way I see it anyway.

Posted by: Pastorius at June 30, 2015 02:30 PM (gMAUH)

405 Finally, for something joyful and uplifting, Henry Miller's "Tropic of Cancer." Just kidding. So "House of Usher" it is.

Posted by: ObjectionSustained at June 30, 2015 02:30 PM (/vphp)

406 Why didn't they just ride the eagles to Fort Doom and toss in the ring and head home?

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:31 PM (n3Sbm)

407 Lizzy Warren's cookbook was not weird because of Indian crab recipes, but because of Indian crab recipes from *Oklahoma*.

Posted by: logprof: USA! at June 30, 2015 02:31 PM (JVgzo)

408 By the way, since you are wont to pick up a novel like that, check out the first 20 pages of The Familiar, Danielewski's latest tome.

Posted by: Pastorius at June 30, 2015 02:31 PM (gMAUH)

409 With apologies to the Horde if these have been read and had their virtues extolled:

The Martian by Andy Weir, The Croning by Laird Barron, House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski, Hell House by Richard Matheson, The Exorcist (obviously) by William Peter Blatty, Ghost Story by Peter Straub, and both 14 and The Fold by Peter Clines.

Some are older, some are newer, all are either Horror, Sci-Fi, or both.

Posted by: The Obsidian Owl at June 30, 2015 02:31 PM (2Uoun)

410 Lizzy Warren's cookbook was not weird because of Indian crab recipes, but because of Indian crab recipes from *Oklahoma*. Posted by: logprof: USA! I've seen crab-riddled people in Guthrie, OK.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:32 PM (VAsIq)

411 Interesting factoid:

Robert Louis Stevenson wrote "Treasure Island" in Savannah, while boarding in a house across the street from what is now known as the Pirate House (restaurant).  The Pirate House is so named because of tunnels that led to the river, and men were shanghaied after getting drunk and woke up on board ships at sea.  And he based a character or two on pirates who boarded there.

The old building is creepy as hell.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:32 PM (FsuaD)

412 i have this idea that history appeals chiefly to men and i'm going for a mixed-sex thing here. Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:36 PM (bhepQ) Microagression!!!! Seriously, I love history. I was going to recommend anything by David Hackett Fisher, who writes about colonial and early American history. "Paul Revere's Ride" and "Washington's Crossing" are great. Lighter reading for summer, but still quite informative and interesting: anything by Bill Bryson. "One Summer: America, 1927" and "At Home" are both very good.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 02:33 PM (+XMAD)

413 It's fairly easy to catch crabs in Lawton.

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:33 PM (n3Sbm)

414 Hmm...what book to read? Have you tried...the BIBLE?

Posted by: Smaug the Smug at June 30, 2015 02:33 PM (VAsIq)

415 Anything (text books included) by Issac Asimov.

Posted by: rld77 far far away at June 30, 2015 02:33 PM (P7ECb)

416 I'm in!

Posted by: @votermom at June 30, 2015 02:33 PM (Pmyq5)

417 J'Accuse

Posted by: Emma Sulkowicz at June 30, 2015 07:21 PM (6qR/9)


J'acuzzi

Posted by: French Spa Salesman at June 30, 2015 02:34 PM (oVJmc)

418 We are proud, so proud of our Presdent of Color for bringing down the unemployment rate fron 40% under Bush to 5% now. Good Job Sir and we love you !!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro, VT at June 30, 2015 02:34 PM (lNSdJ)

419 Another recommendation: Lilith by George MacDonald. It wast favorite book iny university English course and played a part in the restoration of my faith. I believe both C.S. Lewis and Tolkien cited MacDonald as influential.

Posted by: Northernlurker at June 30, 2015 02:34 PM (Sf7oH)

420 I think Ace will enjoy The Fall of the House of Usher.

Posted by: The Obsidian Owl at June 30, 2015 02:34 PM (2Uoun)

421 Off to dinner.  I'll check in later to see what the book club choice is.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:34 PM (FsuaD)

422 Can we please refer to the book as "The Autumn of the House of Usher"? That way it's more surprising.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:35 PM (VAsIq)

423 Edmund: A Butler's Tale by E. Blackadder. A huge, roller coaster of a novel in four hundred sizzling chapters. A searing indictment of domestic servitude in the eighteenth century, with some hot gypsies thrown in. Posted by: Stu Podaso at June 30, 2015 07:29 PM (mJzia) I'm kind of chilled. Can someone start a fire?

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at June 30, 2015 02:35 PM (+OXwX)

424 My favorite LL book is Reilly's Luck.  Or the Sackett series that they made the TV movie from. Flint is also good.  And for one with some humor "Fallon".  I like many more but those are my favorites.

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 02:35 PM (GpgJl)

425 I read three quarters of this. I usuall finish a book after getting that far. I have to pick it up again. An album by his sister POE: "Haunted" might help get you back in the mood. It's a set of songs that go along with the book. Actually I liked POE first and her album led me to her brother's book. The book is a hard read though, most of it a distraction.

Posted by: bananaDream at June 30, 2015 02:35 PM (ZctfO)

426 I'm trying to read Ulysses (Joyce's) right now. I have no clue what is going on. I literally read pages of it and it just seems like words in a blender, sentences which (when I can actually parse them) seem unrelated to the sentences before or after. Posted by: is this some kind of elaborate Irish joke? at June 30, 2015 07:10 PM (HQyvY) ________ America, not to be outdone in any regard, produced William Faulkner.

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 02:35 PM (yckiS)

427 Something that's on tape would be good.

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:35 PM (n3Sbm)

428 Boks? Five Letters to the King of Spain by Hernan Cortes. Flywheel - Memories of the Open Road, by Tom Swallow and Arthur H. Pill and the Members of the Muhlberg Motor Club, Stalag IVB, Germany, 1944-1945. How to Mix Drinks Or The Bon Vivant's Companion by Jerry Thomas. Just for starters....

Posted by: Skookumchuk at June 30, 2015 02:36 PM (/WPPJ)

429 319 If you want a nice, neat short novel, may I recommend something by Louis L'Amour? His western novels are about men who are men and how they did the right thing even through excruciating circumstances. The women in the books are also strong yet comely. Maybe "The Daybreakers" or "Sackett."
----------------
I recommend these L'Amour stories: Shalako, The Key-Lock Man, The Tall Stranger, The Man Called Noon, Hondo, Bowdrie and Bowdrie Passes Through, The Iron Marshal, Last Stand at Papago Wells, Down the Long Hills, The Walking Drum. Just about everything dealing with the Sacketts is good too.

Posted by: exdem13 at June 30, 2015 02:36 PM (ry4ab)

430 In the Movie the house actually falls. I saw it in Elementary School.

Posted by: Boss Moss at June 30, 2015 02:37 PM (n3Sbm)

431 319 If you want a nice, neat short novel, may I recommend something by Louis L'Amour? His western novels are about men who are men and how they did the right thing even through excruciating circumstances. The women in the books are also strong yet comely. Maybe "The Daybreakers" or "Sackett." Posted by: California Girl at June 30, 2015 07:10 PM (l+qoZ) He also wrote a book called "The Last of the Breed" that was great.

Posted by: SARDiver at June 30, 2015 02:37 PM (DzJBg)

432 57 Amity Shales "The Forgotten Man" Hit Coolidge too. She does a great job with them.

Posted by: PassablyAffable at June 30, 2015 02:37 PM (343vT)

433 376 >>>If you want a nice, neat short novel, may I recommend something by Louis L'Amour? His western novels are about men who are men and how they did the right thing even through excruciating circumstances. The women in the books are also strong yet comely. Maybe "The Daybreakers" or "Sackett."

i'd give that kind of a western a try... but him or zane gray?

One cool thing about L'Amour is that he is accurate when describing geography; it's all real--places you can find.  He's also quite conservative in his outlook.  I haven't read any Gray for years; I've just started getting into L'Amour as a way to connect to my dad. 

"Hound of the Baskervilles" is a great read; although, it's been since eighth grade since I read it.  Made me love mystery books.

Haven't read Usher in decades either.  It'll be interesting to see how much comes back to me as I read it because I don't remember much. 


Posted by: California Girl at June 30, 2015 02:38 PM (l+qoZ)

434 Gulag, A History, by Anne Applebaum Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 06:52 PM (VAsIq) Gulag is excellent, but one of the most depressing books ever.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 02:38 PM (+XMAD)

435 "Or we could just do 'I am Legend'." I Am Legend is fantastic, and the title fits into the story in a way different and way cooler way than the meh Will Smith film. Pride and Prejudice is great too. Good book, agree it's very funny, "for chicks" only in the sense that it does have several chicks in it. Both short.

Posted by: Doctor Cynic at June 30, 2015 02:38 PM (rzggC)

436 "Bored of the Rings" - the Tolkein-inspired book that will finaly lay waste to the trilogiphilia of Peter Jackson. Line by line, could be the funniest book ever written. It does require familiarity with Tolkien. Posted by: rrpjr at June 30, 2015 07:29 PM (s/yC1) ---- "In his hand he carried an ancient and trusty weapon, called by the elves a Browning semi-automatic."

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 30, 2015 02:39 PM (jR7Wy)

437 The old building is creepy as hell. Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:32 PM (FsuaD) At least two of the character names-- John Silver and Israel Hands-- are lifted straight from historical pirates. Dunno if those are the guys you meant, though

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 02:39 PM (unjBv)

438 Damn. Was really hoping for Lovecraft's The Shadow Over Innsmouth.

Posted by: Sharkman at June 30, 2015 02:40 PM (72D6h)

439 My all time favourite book title: A Scent of New Mown Hay by John Blackburn. Math book: Against The Gods: the story of Risk by Peter Bernstein.

Posted by: Northernlurker at June 30, 2015 02:41 PM (Sf7oH)

440

Ace, I'm happy to nudge you on Dracula.  One of my all time favorites.  I always liked very much how the structure of the book (letters, diaries, etc) not only told the story but developed the characters.  I like "collection of records" books like that.

Those who recommend Tom Wolfe I can go with too--some of his earliest stuff is something I'd like to revisit, particularly Candy-Coated Tangerine Flake Streamline Baby, and the discussion of the relationship between bootlegging, stock car racing, and a tradition of personal physical courage.  I have enjoyed most of his stuff.

I need my own nudges on the political stuff, but probably needn't be nudged too hard to read Sowell--his columns are always a source of interest.

Yes, do Dracula! (please)

Posted by: barbarausa at June 30, 2015 02:41 PM (DyGWm)

441 I was pulling for William S Burroughs' "Naked Lunch".

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 30, 2015 02:42 PM (jR7Wy)

442 Just started "Ready Player One"; seems good in the first 20 pages. RE--Political books: The great thing about "The Road to Serfdom" is that you get different things out of it with successive readings. One passage that I had not picked up on my first 2 readings is Hayek's attack on crony capitalism as well as his solution to the problem of rent-seekers. "The Vision of The Anointed" pretty much predicts the rise of the SJW crowd and it too is worth multiple readings. $.02 kicked in.

Posted by: KingShamus at June 30, 2015 02:42 PM (vROHw)

443 Time for me to do disk cleanup and get ready to hit the sack.  I guess I'll check back or ask tomorrow what the final decision was

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 02:42 PM (GpgJl)

444 Some good hard boiled crime thrillers would be really cool down the road

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 02:42 PM (SyKbw)

445 "Was really hoping for Lovecraft's The Shadow Over Innsmouth."

Huge Lovecraft fan. I don't think I'd even need to reread this one for a book club. It's one of my favorites.

Posted by: The Obsidian Owl at June 30, 2015 02:43 PM (2Uoun)

446 Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 07:42 PM (GpgJl) Fall of the House of Usher was chosen

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 02:43 PM (SyKbw)

447 Vonnegut's "Slaughterhouse Five"

Posted by: MaxMBJ at June 30, 2015 02:44 PM (Uq9ly)

448 I will say of the film "House of Usher" that it is my favorite of the several Edgar Allan Poe films that Roger Corman made back in the 60's. Very chilling, which took me by surprise for how old the movie was.

Posted by: Time Rat at June 30, 2015 02:44 PM (mM/Om)

449 Number one must-read short story of all time: Harrison Bergeron. Then watch the 30-minute movie version, 2084. Stunning.

Posted by: MaxMBJ at June 30, 2015 02:45 PM (Uq9ly)

450 333 320 250 We should have a moron meet-up at Poe's grave. Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:00 PM (FsuaD) Baltimore? Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at June 30, 2015 07:10 PM (GpgJl) I have an ancestor buried there who was actually married to Napoleon Bonaparte's brother, Jerome. She gave birth to the only American Bonaparte, before Napoleon summoned his brother home and made him divorce her. Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:13 PM (FsuaD) There was a Horatio Hornblower episode about this. Great series of books (and A&E shows).

Posted by: SARDiver at June 30, 2015 02:45 PM (DzJBg)

451 Kim by Rudyard Kipling. Harry Potter of the 19th century. Great classic that you won't have to be coerced to read a second time.

Posted by: TheOtherJay at June 30, 2015 02:46 PM (lCxFJ)

452 Interesting factoid: Robert Louis Stevenson wrote "Treasure Island" in Savannah, while boarding in a house across the street from what is now known as the Pirate House (restaurant). The Pirate House is so named because of tunnels that led to the river, and men were shanghaied after getting drunk and woke up on board ships at sea. And he based a character or two on pirates who boarded there. Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:32 PM ________ Another factoid, albeit less interesting: Robert Louis Stevenson wrote "The Master of Ballantrae" in a cure cottage in Saranac Lake, New York, where he lived briefly due to his bad health. Anyone can tour the house, which isn't creepy at all.

Posted by: FireHorse at June 30, 2015 02:46 PM (yckiS)

453 Shutting out the Krauts for a half? I'll take that.

Posted by: logprof: USA!! at June 30, 2015 02:46 PM (JVgzo)

454 " CBD suggested Poe's "Fall of the House of Usher," which I always wanted to read. I have no idea what it's about, though I suppose there's a house involved, and some substandard foundation work. Spoiler Alert: It's fan fiction, based upon the scene where Dorothy arrives from Kansas (second spoiler alert: the mood is in black & white because the story ends when the film scene turns to Techicolor).

Posted by: Arbalest at June 30, 2015 02:46 PM (FlRtG)

455 "For Us the Living" by Heinlein. It's interesting to me, because he discusses some economic concepts including one that suggest credit/debt is bad, and that at some point, all nations decided to just forgive each others debt. I was surprised to read that by Heinlein, and like many books of the era from great writers; it seems now to be a manual of operations for Progressives rather than a warning; although Heinlein's book is not a diopic.

Posted by: Leland at June 30, 2015 02:47 PM (5wUny)

456 Intermittent fasting, cessation of tanline porn consumption, giving up smoking, etc. are all signs of a budding stoic. Read these and then read them again. And then keep reading them. Letters from a Stoic Seneca Meditations Marcus Aurelius

Posted by: Gristle Encased Head at June 30, 2015 02:47 PM (1RNgT)

457

Harrison Bergeron should be required reading in all public schools, but most are too busy making it happen. 

best Vonnegut (IMO):  Slapstick.

My absolute favorite

Posted by: barbarausa at June 30, 2015 02:47 PM (DyGWm)

458 It's all dark like its going to rain. I check the weather rpt and it says chance of thundershowers but the hourly forecast is zero precipitation for the rest of the day/night. Weather forecast for SoCal is worthless.

Posted by: Mrs. Ace of Spades with a Wang! at June 30, 2015 02:47 PM (iQIUe)

459 Posted by: Time Rat at June 30, 2015 07:44 PM (mM/Om) Good but man, Masque of the Red Death was a better flick

Posted by: The Dude at June 30, 2015 02:48 PM (SyKbw)

460 Posted by: Arbalest at June 30, 2015 07:46 PM (FlRtG) Stan Lee's cameo was lame, too

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 02:48 PM (unjBv)

461 Freedom Betrayed by Herbert Hoover. And the correct title from my post above is Five Letters from Mexico by Hernan Cortes. Garrison's Who's Who in Woodhouse - indispensable for keeping everything straight.

Posted by: Skookumchuk at June 30, 2015 02:48 PM (/WPPJ)

462 At least two of the character names-- John Silver and Israel Hands-- are lifted straight from historical pirates. ------ "One more step, Mr. Hands, and I'll blow your brains out." That line has stayed with me since I read the book as a seven(?)-year-old.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:49 PM (VAsIq)

463 An album by his sister POE: "Haunted" might help get you back in the mood. It's a set of songs that go along with the book. Actually I liked POE first and her album led me to her brother's book. The book is a hard read though, most of it a distraction. Posted by: bananaDream at June 30, 2015 07:35 PM (ZctfO) --- Me too. I loved that she incorporated recordings of her late father's voice taken from a box of audio tapes she found. Talk about being haunted from beyond the grave. Also, "Hello" is one of my favorite albums.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 30, 2015 02:49 PM (jR7Wy)

464 Stan Lee's cameo was lame, too Yeah, they really needed to get the timing of the red smoke down.

Posted by: Arbalest at June 30, 2015 02:49 PM (FlRtG)

465 Perhaps we should read "Gone With the Wind" while it's still available (although I never liked either Scarlett or Melanie very much - I thought Scarlett was a cold-hearted bitch and Melanie was too much of a goody two-shoes. And Ashley was a wuss. Really, the only main character I liked was Rhett.)

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 02:51 PM (+XMAD)

466 Without Vodka by Aleksandr Topolski.

The book is about a Polish teenager drafted into the Polish Army at the beginning of WWII and taken prisoner by the Soviets. He discusses the cruelties of the labour camps with sangfroid and the book is generally free of opprobrium, which comes as some surprise under the circumstances. After all, some of the guards carting the Poles and other flotsam of the Soviet invasions of Europe in 1939-40 (and retreats from the same from1941-1942) are as ragged and bare-arsed as their charges. The stoicism and good humour of his account is a welcome departure from the weak hearts and thin skins that typify these, the Obama years.

He spends time in the gulag before signing up with the Free Polish Army.

Posted by: Jarl at June 30, 2015 02:51 PM (SApvt)

467 In the Movie the house actually falls. I saw it in Elementary School. Wrong movie.

Posted by: The Wicked Witch of the East at June 30, 2015 02:53 PM (8ZskC)

468 I was really hoping to read "Profiles in Courage" by conservative darling John F. Kennedy.

Posted by: no one at June 30, 2015 02:53 PM (VAsIq)

469 Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:13 PM (FsuaD) So you have some Bonaparte blood in you? That's quite interesting.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 02:53 PM (+XMAD)

470 For those with kids:

Turtledove's The Gladiator
and Punching Stalin in the Nose.

Posted by: Jean at June 30, 2015 02:54 PM (ztOda)

471 My favorite depiction of Napoleon is from Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.

Posted by: Turd Ferguson at June 30, 2015 02:54 PM (VAsIq)

472 So you have some Bonaparte blood in you? That's quite interesting. Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 07:53 PM (+XMAD) Now you know why she hates Obama so much. "Pfft. Nouveau riche trash."

Posted by: Secundus at June 30, 2015 02:55 PM (unjBv)

473 >>465 Perhaps we should read "Gone With the Wind" while it's still available (although I never liked either Scarlett or Melanie very much - I thought Scarlett was a cold-hearted bitch and Melanie was too much of a goody two-shoes. And Ashley was a wuss. Really, the only main character I liked was Rhett.) Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 07:51 PM (+XMAD) I read it in high school. I like Melanie and scarlet but yes Ashley sucks. It's a thousand pages long though. It looks like house of usher has already been picked though which should be easy. Probably read it a long time ago.

Posted by: Lea at June 30, 2015 02:55 PM (vmMMi)

474 469 Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:13 PM (FsuaD)

So you have some Bonaparte blood in you? That's quite interesting.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 07:53 PM (+XMAD)



Nope.  My ancestor was a known slutty acting wealthy young woman in Baltimore.  Her blood runs through my veins.  Heh. 



Her son, by Jerome Bonaparte, has ancestors here in the U. S. 

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 02:56 PM (FsuaD)

475 My favorite depiction of Napoleon is from Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure. Posted by: Turd Ferguson My favorite depiction of him is from the "Napoleon Bunnyparte" Bugs Bunny cartoon.

Posted by: Prince Ludwig the Indestructible at June 30, 2015 02:56 PM (tgnRB)

476 Free Polish Army. Posted by: Jarl at June 30, 2015 07:51 PM (SApvt) Get rhythm when you get the blues, cmon...

Posted by: obscure johnny cash reference at June 30, 2015 02:56 PM (AkOaV)

477 Letters from a Stoic Seneca Meditations Marcus Aurelius Posted by: Gristle Encased Head at June 30, 2015 07:47 PM (1RNgT) --- Enchiridion - Epictetus (Not that I've incorporated any of it into my personal comportment, but I've enjoyed reading it.)

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 30, 2015 02:57 PM (jR7Wy)

478 I was really hoping to read "Profiles in Courage" by conservative darling John F. Kennedy. Posted by: no one at June 30, 2015 07:53 PM (VAsIq) Ahem.

Posted by: Zombie Ted Sorensen at June 30, 2015 02:57 PM (+OXwX)

479 Hawkins: My husband and I just ditched our cripplingly expensive insurance for a Christian Health Share - a different one from yours. So far we love it. We love the opportunity to pray for people and help them out if they need it. God bless you, prayers said. For books, decent historical fiction: Mika Waltari

Posted by: Actinide at June 30, 2015 02:58 PM (0mwvC)

480 Also, "Hello" is one of my favorite albums. Same here. I was hooked on female rock/pop soloists for a while with her being the best.

Posted by: bananaDream at June 30, 2015 02:58 PM (ZctfO)

481 And, and - Bunny Berigan: Elusive Legend of Jazz by Robert Dupuis.

Posted by: Skookumchuk at June 30, 2015 02:58 PM (/WPPJ)

482 Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:56 PM (FsuaD) Ah, I see. More than one possible 19th century baby daddy there....

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 02:59 PM (+XMAD)

483 Free Polish Army. Posted by: Jarl at June 30, 2015 07:51 PM (SApvt) With purchase of blini plate of equal or greater value.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at June 30, 2015 02:59 PM (+OXwX)

484 Same here. I was hooked on female rock/pop soloists for a while with her being the best. Posted by: bananaDream at June 30, 2015 07:58 PM (ZctfO) --- Second bestest: Vanessa Daou (Zipless and Plutonium Glow)

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at June 30, 2015 03:00 PM (jR7Wy)

485 482 Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 07:56 PM (FsuaD)

Ah, I see. More than one possible 19th century baby daddy there....

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 07:59 PM (+XMAD)




They were married, and apparently the toast of Baltimore (I have the family histor(ies).  Jerome encouraged her to dress in nearly see-through clothing, and they were apparently very much in love.  Then Big Brother summoned little brother home, ordered him to divorce her (baby had already been born), and ordered his brother to marry someone more "proper."



She never recovered from the divorce.  Her own father dis-owned her for her previous "scandalous" behavior, and she died in old age alone.

Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 03:03 PM (FsuaD)

486 Hey, why didn't we see this option on the menu?

Posted by: Russian Uranium Interests at June 30, 2015 03:08 PM (8ZskC)

487 Any of Jacob Abbott's "Makers of History" series. Well written histories from Romulus to Peter the Great. Done well before PC history re-writes. Most are free at Amazon.

Posted by: Anchovy at June 30, 2015 03:10 PM (BqtNO)

488 Being as we are in a sad state with regards the complete collapse of the constitutional order, I would suggest we read the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution and Bill of Rights in their entirety. I would suggest Waterdhip Down, it contains a great contrast between tyranny and freedom that is applicable today. I would also suggest The Lost Art of Walking, it's a fascinating read and has a lot to teach us about ourselves.

Posted by: Kreplach at June 30, 2015 03:11 PM (RfwXt)

489

If somebody hasn't suggested it already:

The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt

Posted by: wth at June 30, 2015 03:13 PM (wAQA5)

490 Jerome encouraged her to dress in nearly see-through clothing, and they were apparently very much in love. Posted by: Jane D'oh at June 30, 2015 08:03 PM (FsuaD) Those Regency-era dresses were pretty revealing - the material was very sheer and, in Europe, at least, I've read that the more dissolute aristocrats would dampen their bodices for a "wet T-shirt" effect. So it could be that he was encouraging her to act more "European" and since she was in Baltimore and not Paris, it was held against her. Sad story.

Posted by: Donna &&&&&& V. (brandishing ampersands) at June 30, 2015 03:20 PM (+XMAD)

491 I haven't read FotHoU (because all book titles must be acronymed these days) in about 15 years. I got one of those big Complete Works Of books for Poe and went through almost everything he wrote.

Be damned if I can remember what it was about. But I do love a lot of 19th century writing. I look forward to cracking that book back open.

Posted by: Burn the Witch at June 30, 2015 03:20 PM (xSCb6)

492 Road to Serfdom vote here. Almost bought it on Amazon on Sunday night, actually.

Posted by: Dave S. at June 30, 2015 03:25 PM (mhkbv)

493 Looks as if the choice has already been made, but in case there's still a chance of any last-minute reconsiderations, if you're going with Poe, why not one of the M. Auguste Dupin stories, like Murders in the Rue Morgue, or The Purloined Letter? A certain author with the initials A.C.D. got a major bit of inspiration from those, and it's rather compelling to see the literary equivalent of ground zero for an entire genre.

Posted by: A. Pendragon at June 30, 2015 03:31 PM (Lrzm4)

494 USA up a goal after PK

Posted by: logprof --USA!! at June 30, 2015 03:31 PM (JVgzo)

495 I echo the suggestion for something by Tom Wolfe. I propose his Radical Chic and Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers. It's political and short, which seem to be two prerequisites for getting anyone around here to finish something by the deadline.

Posted by: C.T. at June 30, 2015 03:32 PM (N9zlS)

496 If you want to be all smarty-pants: Heretics by G.K. Chesterton is under 200 pages. It's so brilliant that it takes your breath away. If you want a long book, The Count of Monte Cristo is the most satisfying plot in the history of satisfying plots.

Posted by: BunnyFooFoo at June 30, 2015 03:35 PM (fdjeU)

497 Dracula is worth reading, by the way. It's funny to see the contrast (Countrast?) between the book, where Dracula is an absolute monster, the embodiment of corruption and evil, and the sympathetic modern take on vampires.

Posted by: BunnyFooFoo at June 30, 2015 03:37 PM (fdjeU)

498 Ill-tempered cur, 375--I wouldn't blame Forster for QoS. That was during a writer's strike and apparently he and Daniel Craig had to...kind of wing it, I guess. =P

Posted by: Blake at June 30, 2015 03:39 PM (m3P2y)

499 Cynic, 435--In fairness to Wil(l?) Smith, he did want the original ending in there, and I believe it was actually shot. The studio changed it to...the mess it was.

Posted by: Blake at June 30, 2015 03:44 PM (m3P2y)

500 O.K., here goes. 5...29...40...124...153. A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson The Anabasis by Arrian Cicero by Anthony Everitt Anything by John McPhee Anything by Mark Bowden We Were Soldiers Once and Young by Joseph Galloway

Posted by: I.C.Nielsen at June 30, 2015 03:48 PM (PsLqF)

501 Anything by VDH.
But I highly recommend: Hoplites: The classical Greek battle experience.
Most excellent book on hoplite tactics, life and strategies.
http://tinyurl.com/o4h7ra5

Posted by: exsanguine at June 30, 2015 03:48 PM (V0oj4)

502 499 Cynic, 435--In fairness to Wil(l?) Smith, he did want the original ending in there, and I believe it was actually shot. The studio changed it to...the mess it was. Didn't know that, Blake. Good for Will Smith. I'm stretching my self-control to its limit by not spoiling what "I am legend" really means for people who don't know. Probably my favorite lightbulb moment in anything I've ever read.

Posted by: Doctor Cynic at June 30, 2015 03:59 PM (rzggC)

503 Word of advice from an avid reader and English Lit. major -- skip Moby Dick (watch one of the movies); read Billy Budd -- it's Melville's best (and much shorter!).

Posted by: L.D. at June 30, 2015 04:02 PM (SipA3)

504 The fall of the house of Usher read on Youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSKAaV-Vv8Y

Posted by: Robinson at June 30, 2015 04:04 PM (1SHv1)

505 Second #123's Dostoyevsky, with my vote going to "Crime And Punishment." It's a great story, very readable and full of truth about human psychology. Has an interesting backstory about its writing, too -- FD was dealing with serious adversity towards the end of his career when he churned out this masterpiece.

Posted by: Octopus at June 30, 2015 04:08 PM (gnD2y)

506 And, hey, Dr. Cynic--All three movies have exactly NO spoilers in them. So there's that. =P

Posted by: Blake at June 30, 2015 04:14 PM (m3P2y)

507 How about a book that --if the manuscript were submitted to Dell Books' editors today-- would never have been published: Alex Haley's "Roots."

Posted by: Manolo at June 30, 2015 04:15 PM (Z+kHZ)

508 Rudyard Kipling's "Kim."

Posted by: Manolo at June 30, 2015 04:16 PM (Z+kHZ)

509 The Sports Gene It'll make you re-think a lot about the things you thought you knew about sports and athleticism.

Posted by: Warden at June 30, 2015 04:18 PM (wHAYQ)

510 Read the Saxon Chronicles in order by Bernard Cornwell. Nobody does medieval battles better. Puts the Game of Thrones crap to shame.

Posted by: Barry at June 30, 2015 04:22 PM (4cEdi)

511 Usher is a great suggestion; it's been a while since I read it but I think it might just parallel our time in spooky ways, hah. Love Poe. Always wanted to read Road to Serfdom and Forgotten Man. If dystopian fiction isn't too throat slitting, animal farm or brave new world. Or Fahrenheit 451? Anything Bradbury really is a good bet. Classics are good. Frankenstein would be an excellent one. There is a lit of Classic Russian lit I have never read but hope to get to one day. Or Fahrenheit 451? Anything Bradbury. Scarlet pimpernel? We might need lessons on resistance after the modern guillotiners start guillotining each other. They seek him here they seek him there, those frenchies seek him everywhere...

Posted by: LizLem at June 30, 2015 04:27 PM (3sozU)

512 505 re ostoyesky The Brothers Karamarov

Posted by: Ken at June 30, 2015 04:29 PM (FQMPG)

513 There was a novel in the 80's written by a general about WW3, August 1984. Technical, gripping, very long, but an excellent work.

Posted by: Ken at June 30, 2015 04:32 PM (FQMPG)

514 506 And, hey, Dr. Cynic--All three movies have exactly NO spoilers in them. So there's that. =P Posted by: Blake at June 30, 2015 09:14 PM (m3P2y) This is very true. If Ace does do Dracula, I do think we should do a "how does Dracula die" pre-test. My favorite literary trivia question, tied with "What's Winnie-the-Pooh's real name?" (Edward Bear)

Posted by: Doctor Cynic at June 30, 2015 04:34 PM (rzggC)

515 Whoops I said Bradbury twice. Well I like Bradbury. I'd love the book club to be new books or ones I haven't read in a while, but I really do love watership down. And I mentioned this in a garden thread once, but the book Founding Gardeners is great. A look at the founding fathers through their love of plants. Get it before it is banned! ( I'm kidding. Sorta.)

Posted by: LizLem at June 30, 2015 04:35 PM (3sozU)

516 I read Gulliver's Travels a few months ago, very good, so was Candide. Medium-length classics I'd like to read include Faust, Scarlet Pimpernel, Treasure Island. Would like to read some longer works like Fountainhead, Middlemarch, Don Quixote and many others.

Posted by: waelse1 at June 30, 2015 04:44 PM (DaHr6)

517 Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy

Posted by: Papa Rod at June 30, 2015 04:55 PM (EEAs2)

518 Late to the thread, as usual. Fall of the House of Usher, is free on kindle along with other AEP stories. Just ordered it. Might I suggest Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein" for future consideration ? It tells of what happens when men want to play God. And the results that ensue. Sound familiar ?

Posted by: seamrog at June 30, 2015 04:56 PM (uLY8B)

519 Fall of the House of Usher is great, and I haven't read it for a couple of decades. I can't believe someone actually recommended Great Expectations. Horrible, horrible book. Wouldn't wish it on anybody. For Hayek, I'd suggest The Constitution of Liberty instead of RtS. It's easier to sell the case for liberty than the case against totalitarianism.

Posted by: Luke at June 30, 2015 04:57 PM (8pLmV)

520 Brackenstein. I will play god. I will lower the ocean levels. I will change marriage. I will reform health of humans. I will stop war by giving weapons to the enemy. Cameo appearance by Joe "Ygor" Biden

Posted by: seamrog at June 30, 2015 05:04 PM (uLY8B)

521 You might consider "Days of Rage," by Bryan Burrough, starring Bill Ayers, Bernardine Dohrn, Assata Shakur and other charmers, and featuring Bill Clinton in a cameo role, pardoning the FALN bombers.

Posted by: Veritas at June 30, 2015 05:16 PM (uI4W1)

522 I recommend Vanity Fair by Wm. Makepeace Thackeray. Witty, subtle, and chock full of karma.

Posted by: Strictly from apathy at June 30, 2015 06:10 PM (VQea+)

523 I hear Green Eggs and Ham is a good read and if you have time try Are You My Mother?

Posted by: Driz at June 30, 2015 06:36 PM (RRa0Q)

524 I see it was Poe in the end after all.  OK

Posted by: Vic[/i] We Have No Party at July 01, 2015 12:21 AM (GpgJl)

525 Ah, Poe. I thought I had this laying around somewhere, and I found this in my library this morning, in The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. Old edition. Tiny, tiny text versus my Kindle, but I will go old-style and hold the book in my hand with a looking hand glass.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at July 01, 2015 03:34 AM (qCMvj)

526 I'm reading that pop-science writer, the one with the initials MK, japanese name, on wormholes and the fifth dimension and super-string theory right now. Posted by: ace at June 30, 2015 06:25 PM (bhepQ) It takes a lot of reading on quantum, physics, etc to even find some associations and links that give you that "a-ha" moment. The feeling like you are finally understanding how it is all connected. I've done the same. Including a lot of books on the brain, and many other areas of "science." I've not been one for political books, especially the fervor of what is now being dumped in the marketplace. Some oldies I thought I would toss out there. I have shelves of this stuff, when physical books were a thing. In particular order, I just came across some while looking for the Poe book. The Life of the Cosmos, Smolin The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory, Greene The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, Kurzweil And, some classics that should not be missed: Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas R. Hofstadter (one of my all time fav's) The Society of Mind by Marvin Minsky Marvin Minsky -- one of the fathers of computer science and cofounder of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT -- gives a revolutionary answer to the age-old question: "How does the mind work?" Minsky brilliantly portrays the mind as a "society" of tiny components that are themselves mindless. Mirroring his theory, Minsky boldly casts The Society of Mind as an intellectual puzzle whose pieces are assembled along the way. Each chapter -- on a self-contained page -- corresponds to a piece in the puzzle. As the pages turn, a unified theory of the mind emerges, like a mosaic. Ingenious, amusing, and easy to read, The Society of Mind is an adventure in imagination. old stuff, but goodies It's interesting to see what has changed from their theories. So, of course I read, later, the fiction: Society of the Mind by Eric Harry *Nowadays, there is always The Art Of War by Sun Tzu that is worth a few chapters now and again. It's next to my hiking/camping survival guides.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at July 01, 2015 03:52 AM (qCMvj)

527 I know people will mock me for this, but, Proust, which I also ran across in my library. Heady stuff, however. Translations are tough, too. Probably best for personal consumption, but tossing it out there.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at July 01, 2015 04:00 AM (qCMvj)

528 So many great suggestions here. I'm going to save this thread. My pick, one I'd really like to discuss with the horde, is One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

Posted by: Emily at July 01, 2015 04:18 AM (7Rn+/)

529 I would recommend any of the Cornwell's historical Fiction books. Specifically the Sharpe series & The Viking Chronicles. Though I love the rest of it too. http://www.amazon.com/Bernard-Cornwell/e/B000APAB68/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1 I am working my way through the Aubrey/Maturin Series right now too which is excellent. http://www.amazon.com/Patrick-OBrian/e/B002BLL3ZC/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1435770267&sr=1-1-spell

Posted by: ASH at July 01, 2015 08:05 AM (GvBPn)

530 Pair Crime and Punishment by Dostoyevsky with The Heart of Midlothian by Sir Walter Scott; they both have hard-working heroines, deal with the effects of crime and philosophy and show the differing effects of different religious views. I feel the pairing gives a good window into the differences of their societies and why Scotland contributed so much to the enlightenment and the making of the modern world and Russia was just a hanger-on. Old Curmudgeon

Posted by: Old Curmudgeon at July 01, 2015 11:59 AM (JHqZ9)

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