June 30, 2018

Saturday Evening Movie Thread 06-29-2018 [Hosted By: TheJamesMadison]
— Open Blogger

To Be or Not To Be

68. Shakespeare Adaptations 01.jpg

Filmmakers have been making adaptations of Shakespeare for the silver screen pretty much since the advent of the medium. There are adaptations of King Lear, Richard III, The Tempest, and many others that date back to the silent era. It's ripe ground for storytelling because the stories themselves are so good, have stood the test of time, and require little financial investment to get the rights since they're all in the public domain.

Some great filmmakers have taken a stab at some kind of adaptation. Kurosawa famously made Macbeth into Throne of Blood and King Lear into Ran, but in looking back over some of the adaptations I've seen (brought on by a recent viewing of one of the two below films), I've come back some of the basic questions around adaptations. Namely: Is it better to strive for faithfulness or to use the original work as a springboard for another artist's creativity?

With so many adaptations of Shakespeare's work out there, I've focused my thoughts on two films. One of these (Kenneth Branagh's Hamlet) is slavishly faithful to the source material, and the other (Orson Welles' Othello) is not.
The Prince of Denmark

68. Shakespeare Adaptations 02.jpg

When I was an undergraduate I had a Shakespeare professor who brought up a bit of the marketing of this film in class. The film was marketed as "The Complete Hamlet", and that professor found it an amusing contention. "What complete Hamlet?" he would ask as he made references to the questionable authorship of certain sections and the different folios that Hamlet first appeared in.

However, despite that contention of "completeness", it's obvious that when Kenneth Branagh set out to make his version of Hamlet, he was going to get as much of the Bard on screen as he possibly could. And it looks like he succeeded.

The film is four hours long, contains every plot element and character, and is filled with so many movie stars as to make one gag. Some are better than others (Billy Crystal might be the single best part of the film as The Gravedigger), and some act as distractions more than anything else (Gerard Depardieu has such a tiny role as Reynaldo).

Putting aside the casting choices though, was it the film itself a good idea? Every word of the play on screen?

I'll just say that I do love the film. It's not great, though. Branagh makes some weird choices (especially with casting), and I'm not the biggest fan of him as an actor. He speaks the dialogue well, but some of his emotional choices are odd to me. That being said, though, the question at the heart of this post is: Is the film's decision to use as much of Shakespeare as possible a better choice than cutting it down? Was it a better idea to put the Bard at the center stage than the director's vision (and yeah, I know Branagh is an egomaniac, but in this film it's as much at the service of Shakespeare as it is for himself)?

I'll focus on one element: Fortinbras.


Invasion from Norway

68. Shakespeare Adaptations 03.jpg

When faced with adapting a three and a half to four hour play for either the stage or screen, one usually needs to find ways to cut that down to at most three hours if not much further. When faced with that dilemma, you have balance the importance of certain elements to the entire texture of the story against being able to tell the story intelligibly over the shrunken run time. So, what to do with someone like Fortinbras?

First, here's my take on Fortinbras. I think he's a vital point in the whole story. He provides a color to the overall theme of revenge in the play. Hamlet kills Claudius and dies himself, destroying the most obvious leadership of Denmark in the process, creating a situation where Fortinbras, Crown Prince of Norway, can just walk into the room and take up the crown. Hamlet not only died in the process of getting his revenge, perhaps a sacrifice he was willing to take to avenge his father's murder, but, in addition to that, Denmark itself as an independent nation falls. That was the greatest price of Hamlet's revenge, the loss of his nation's independence.

The inclusion of Fortinbras makes Hamlet's actions seem myopic in comparison to the damage he wrought on Denmark. No longer ruled by Danes, the country will be ruled by Norwegians. Was that worth it? Hamlet cannot answer because he died due to the poison on Laertes' sword. It's a great coloring to the overall story that I don't enjoy losing in an adaptation.

However, do you need that in order to tell the basic story? Nope. Not in the least. Adding Fortinbras adds something, but the question then becomes for the viewer, was that addition worth it? I think so.


The Moor

68. Shakespeare Adaptations 04.jpg

Orson Welles plays Othello the Moor and directs himself, in much the same way that Branagh directed himself and acted in Hamlet. However, unlike Branagh's film, Welles had a devil of a time actually making the thing. It took three years of filming that were often broken because of lack of funding. Welles would jet off to another set to take a job and then use that money to pay for the production further. He actually filmed his part in Carol Reed's The Third Man at this time.

What ends up on screen is much less elegant than what Branagh put together, but I love is just as much.

Branagh was allowed a complete schedule to make his film, and his directing style is much more standard than Welles'. In addition, where Branagh sought to film every work Shakespeare might have put into Hamlet, Welles took the three hour play of Othello and made a ninety minute movie out of it. And I think that Welles and Branagh love Shakespeare equally, but that love manifests in wildly different ways. Where Branagh was slavishly devotional to the text, Welles used the text as an excuse to make a movie.

First, take a look at the below scene from the end of the film:

The first thing that jumps out to me is Welles' uncanny ability to frame things oddly but perfectly. Off-kilter angles that highlight power imbalances between characters, fascinating compositions that draw your eye exactly where it needs to be. The man had a remarkable visual talent.

Second, you'll notice the complete disconnect between the spoken dialogue and the moving of lips. This is a problem with a lot of Welles' later work. One way he cut costs (because people with money were wary to actually give him money) was to film without sound, and he loved to move things around in editing (there are two Director's Cuts, for lack of a better term, of Othello), which ended up having the effect of a lot of what gets said just simply cannot match what the lips are doing.

Moving beyond these more technical considerations of the film and towards the adaptive aspects, it's obvious that this scene is cut down. Shakespeare takes a lot longer to let dialogue flow in scenes than what Welles' put to screen. He cut the text of the play down to its bones and then placed his stamp on top. Watching his Othello, even in its opening frames, it's primarily obvious that this is a Welles film first and foremost and a Shakespeare film second. The film is more about what Welles can accomplish with a camera and performance that what Shakespeare had accomplished 350 years prior.


Is One Approach Better than the Other?

I'm not talking about which film is better than the other. Personally, I think they both miss on greatness but are wonderful watches anyway. No, I'm talking about which approach to adapting Shakespeare do you prefer?

If I had to chose (and since I'm posing the question to you all, I consider that imposition enough to do it), then I would chose Welles' approach. I'd rather have artists fiercely making art that is their own than acting subservient to someone dead for over 300 hundred years. Shakespeare's work will endure in its original form, the written word (which I hate to read, Shakespeare should be watched not read). Do we need another adaptation of Romeo and Juliet that's exactly the text performed as it would have been performed in the 1600s but with women actually playing the roles of women? Or, do we need Baz Lurhmann to take the play and put a decidedly weird and personal stamp on it?


You decide.


Movies of Today

Opening in Theaters:
Sicario: Day of the Soldado
Uncle Drew
Sanju

Next in my Netflix Queue:
A Dangerous Method

Movies I Saw This Week:
Payback: Straight Up: The Director's Cut (Netflix Rating 3/5 | Quality Rating 2.5/4) Poster blurb: "I still don't like the first act, find the second to poorly balance between conflicting tones, but the third seems much improved." [Netflix DVD]
Othello (Netflix Rating 5/5 | Quality Rating 3.5/4) "A work of rough and determined personal artistic vision." [Personal Collection]


Contact

Email any suggestions or questions to thejamesmadison.aos at symbol gmail dot com.

I've also archived all the old posts here, by request. I'll add new posts a week after they originally post at the HQ.

And, please, visit my website.

My next collection of short stories, Mutiny! goes on sale tomorrow in both eBook and print editions!

Posted by: Open Blogger at 02:09 PM | Comments (472)
Post contains 1586 words, total size 11 kb.

1 I'd like to point out that the Strange Brew featuring Bob and Doug MacKenzie ("take off, eh?") is basically a silly retelling of Hamlet.

'Elsinore' Beer is a tell.

Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at June 30, 2018 02:11 PM (a1v7v)

2 Looked at the pictures, Counts as reading content, right?

Posted by: Blake - used scripting salesman at June 30, 2018 02:11 PM (WEBkv)

3 Hey TJM. I missed ya. Just FYI, I just got The Death Of Stalin... but on DVD. Apparently no domestic blu-ray release is scheduled; there's absolutely nothing at www.blu-ray.com about it. Only BR available looks like a foreign edition. And hey... let's talk TV! Who else here is all a-tingle waiting for the Roseanneless Roseanne? IMHO it should go over like a lead zeppelin. Oh wait a sec...

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:11 PM (eMKNe)

4 g'early evenin', 'rons

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 30, 2018 02:11 PM (KCxzN)

5 Firstest

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:11 PM (EzdLW)

6 Rats, no first. Wait, OM? Haha! No first for you, 'cause you have blog powers!

Posted by: Blake - used scripting salesman at June 30, 2018 02:12 PM (WEBkv)

7 And to think Shakespeare is becoming null and void for English literature at universities

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 02:12 PM (pHfeF)

8 Nope, skimmed the content, not firstest

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:12 PM (EzdLW)

9 2 Looked at the pictures, Counts as reading content, right? Posted by: Blake - used scripting salesman at June 30, 2018 07:11 PM (WEBkv) ====== The content isn't worth it. Trust me.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:12 PM (Jj43a)

10 Rifftrax spoofed on the German version of Hamlet, starring Maximillian Schell. it was, um, odd. Like they used an old Obsession by Calvin Klein set.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:12 PM (EhZNT)

11 I'd like to point out that the Strange Brew featuring Bob and Doug MacKenzie ("take off, eh?") is basically a silly retelling of Hamlet. 'Elsinore' Beer is a tell. Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at June 30, 2018 07:11 PM (a1v7v) No way they could be that smart. They're Canadian, after all. JK. Dave Thomas and Rick Moranis are friggin' awesome.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:13 PM (EhZNT)

12 JUST in time for movie thread! Now to read the content, TJM's advice or no...

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:14 PM (xJa6I)

13 OregonMuse, there should be another Strange Brew movie... about the life/times of the rock band, Cream. ;-) What would folks here say is the all-time best rock band movie? Some ideas for nominees: - A Hard Day's Night - Help! - Yellow Submarine - Tommy - The Song Remains The Same - Pink Floyd: The Wall ...I admit the only one I really want to see is the one I'll probably have to wait the longest for, which is, Let It Be. Supposedly it won't come out until both Paul McCartney *and* Yoko are gone.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:14 PM (eMKNe)

14 I'm a Moop!

Posted by: Othello at June 30, 2018 02:14 PM (Q9ugn)

15 Oh and I haven't watched many movies lately. Not since Infinity War. I did watch an animated direct to video movie: Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay. It was pretty good. A little too 'edgy' in ways but good.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:14 PM (xJa6I)

16 I have always enjoyed the current version of " A Midsummers Night Dream"

Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 02:14 PM (UwkGr)

17 14 I'm a Moop! Posted by: Othello at June 30, 2018 07:14 PM (Q9ugn) ===== How many times did I write and think about the word Moor and not once did that joke come to me? I'm so ashamed...

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:15 PM (Jj43a)

18 The remake of Othello, O in 2001is interesting

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 02:16 PM (pHfeF)

19 Branagh's Henry V is quite good, He makes a good Harry. Great "Band of Brothers" scene. Mel Gibson played a good Hamlet. Zeffirelli cast Mel because of his Riggs in Lethal Weapon.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 02:16 PM (pV/54)

20 Sorry, but I liked Antonini's (was that the guy?) Romeo and Juliet with Olivia Hussey as Juliet, and as much as I can't stand Ms Paltrow, Shakespeare in Love is one I can watch again and again. The ending on a Virginia beach is wonderful, with The Tempest coming to the playwright's imagination.

Posted by: Les Kinetic at June 30, 2018 02:17 PM (IDs0Z)

21 I still want to see Branagh's Hitch/DePalma mashup, Dead Again. I think I know what the twist of it is, but still...

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:17 PM (eMKNe)

22 I've always liked the killing-of-Desdemona scene from the CHEERS episode "Homicidal Ham" (1983). Diane: Help! Help! This psycho is trying is trying to kill me! Coach Ernie Pantusso: That's the first line of Shakespeare I ever understood! https://youtu.be/IkDBINb0wLg

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:18 PM (EzdLW)

23 21 I still want to see Branagh's Hitch/DePalma mashup, Dead Again. I think I know what the twist of it is, but still... Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:17 PM (eMKNe) ====== I want to see him make a King Lear.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:18 PM (Jj43a)

24 TJM, I thought Branagh already did King Lear.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:19 PM (eMKNe)

25 Well, there is that modern remake of Romeo and Juliet known as "Twilight." Or is it "The Twilight Saga?" Though, from what I've seen, it's a bit of a stretch to call "Twilight" as saga.

Posted by: Blake - used scripting salesman at June 30, 2018 02:19 PM (WEBkv)

26 The castaways put Hamlet to music if you remember, of course most of you 29 year olds don't.

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 02:19 PM (pHfeF)

27 Branagh's Henry V is very enjoyable. A number of actors from I, Claudius were in it including Derek Jacobi and Brian "Bellowing" Blessed. And it was good to see Paul Scofield in it as well

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:20 PM (SiINZ)

28 How come Stanley Kubrick never directed a Shakespeare film?

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:20 PM (EzdLW)

29 Haven't seen Welles's Othello, but I rather liked Branagh's Hamlet (except the silly costuming). It made me go back and re-read the play, which I hadn't done in ages. Something struck me: Hamlet's contemplating suicide BEFORE anyone tells him about his father's ghost. So . . . one can kind of see the whole subsequent plot as a very elaborate self-destruct plan on Hamlet's part.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 30, 2018 02:20 PM (BS1PF)

30 My favorite Gilbert & Sullivan performance will always be Kelsey Grammer's as Sideshow Bob, in that Simpsons episode.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:20 PM (eMKNe)

31 I liked Shakespeare in Love, but was deeply annoyed that it "beat" Saving Private Ryan at Oscar time. Might be the last time I bothered with that foolishness.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:20 PM (EhZNT)

32 Colleges are granting English degrees without any Shakespeare requirement. Meanwhile, most good screenwriters know Shakespeare and acknowledge that they stand on his shoulders.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 02:20 PM (pV/54)

33 Better a Moop than a Moogle. Or a Muggle for that matter...

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 02:21 PM (grzBQ)

34 Ok, on the Shakespeare question: I prefer the text, all the text, to adaptation. If you half do it, it's like half-fucking. It's a tease, it's not the full meal deal. Unless you can improve on what is in the text (good luck), speak the speech, I pray you as he pronounced it to you: trippingly on the tongue. There is always an effort to get into a Shakespeare play. Then your brain adjusts and, if the actors are worth anything, you are IN. And everything makes sense. Now, that said, I do think that using Shakespeare's plays as inspirations can result in interesting art. Where you take themes and plots and even characters from the Bard and put them in a new story, that can work. Again, assuming skill on everyone involved. But if you're going to do the play, do the play. Damn few people can improve on what Shakespeare did.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:21 PM (xJa6I)

35 Hands, good question. Probably because Kubrick knew he couldn't get away with renaming the film something like, "Stanley Kubrick's Hamlet." (I love Stanley, but he was notorious for basically trying to usurp the authorship of novels he adapted into films.)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:21 PM (eMKNe)

36 Welles would not be allowed to make Othello today.

Posted by: Trimegistus at June 30, 2018 02:21 PM (BS1PF)

37 24 TJM, I thought Branagh already did King Lear. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:19 PM (eMKNe) ===== I see no mention of one on his IMDb page. He's just now getting old enough to play Lear. Maybe he's done stage stuff, but I don't think he's touched it in film yet.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:21 PM (Jj43a)

38 I still want to see Branagh's Hitch/DePalma mashup, Dead Again. I think I know what the twist of it is, but still... Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:17 PM (eMKNe) Branagh must be a fan of I, Claudius because not only did he use a few actors from that show in his Henry V but it Dead Again, Derek Jacobi s..s..stutters like Claudius.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:21 PM (SiINZ)

39 OK, what bills did Branagh have to pay to be in " Jack Ryan, Shadow Recruit'?

Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 02:21 PM (UwkGr)

40 Oh and Shakespeare 'Truthers' are about as accurate and welcome as Never Trumpers and 9/11 Truthers are today. Some people just can't stand the idea of genius.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:22 PM (xJa6I)

41 I liked reading "Othello." "Othello" Introduced me to one of the evilest types of character to ever exist: Iago.

Posted by: Blake - used scripting salesman at June 30, 2018 02:22 PM (WEBkv)

42 I thought it was going to be about the movie(s) titled To Be or Not To Be. The one Mel Brooks did is classic!

Posted by: Rosasharn at June 30, 2018 02:22 PM (PzBTm)

43 What did you think of Joss Whedon's _Much Ado_. (In B&W, filmed in his backyard, with actor-friends...) Given that Sir Kenneth followed Whedon's overall MARVEL outline when directing _Thor_ I somehow have the idea that pair got together, had a few beers, and discussed Benedict and Beatrice ...

Posted by: pouncer at June 30, 2018 02:22 PM (XjJoi)

44 What would folks here say is the all-time best rock band movie? Some ideas for nominees: - A Hard Day's Night - Help! - Yellow Submarine - Tommy - The Song Remains The Same - Pink Floyd: The Wall ...I admit the only one I really want to see is the one I'll probably have to wait the longest for, which is, Let It Be. Supposedly it won't come out until both Paul McCartney *and* Yoko are gone. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:14 PM Spinal Tap

Posted by: AltonJackson at June 30, 2018 02:23 PM (KCxzN)

45 36 Welles would not be allowed to make Othello today. Posted by: Trimegistus at June 30, 2018 07:21 PM (BS1PF) ===== Well, no one would let him play Othello, at least

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:23 PM (Jj43a)

46 Dangerous Liaisons is another one with many adaptions. The film of the same name with John Malkovich, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Glenn Close. Valmont with Annette Bening, Colin Firth and Meg Tilly. Cruel Intentions with Sarah Michelle Gellar, Ryan Phillippe, and Reese Witherspoon. Those are just the three I've seen (all fantastic), but that's not even half of the films made from that work.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 30, 2018 02:23 PM (1F9jV)

47 I still want to see Branagh's Hitch/DePalma mashup, Dead Again. I think I know what the twist of it is, but still... Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:17 PM That film is OK, although Branagh's attempt at an American accent leaves a lot to be desired.

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:23 PM (EzdLW)

48 Alton, of course I forgot the best one. :-)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:23 PM (eMKNe)

49 Romeo and Juliet 1996 reminds me of the line from Hot Fuzz. Nicholas Angel: You murdered him for that? Simon Skinner: Well, he murdered Bill Shakespeare.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:24 PM (SiINZ)

50 I'd say that Kubrick never did a Shakespeare because he was so visual, not verbal. There's an exhibit of Kubrick's early Look photographs at the Museum of the City of New York. Boy could frame an image.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 02:24 PM (pV/54)

51 33 Better a Moop than a Moogle. Or a Muggle for that matter... Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 07:21 PM (grzBQ) -------------------- Eeeeek! How dare you bring up Potter! The lack of lgbtqrstvwxyz characters is absolutely appalling and the books should be burned!

Posted by: Completely woke person at June 30, 2018 02:24 PM (WEBkv)

52 I saw that Sanju is opening from JMP and I instantly thought, "They're remaking Kurosawa?

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 02:24 PM (+Tibp)

53 Movies I Saw This Week: ++++ Only two? What, you were goofing off instead?

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 30, 2018 02:25 PM (1F9jV)

54 Joss Whedon may be a rotten human being with rotten politics, but his version of Much Ado About Nothing is fine. The two best points are: the setting - actually the Whedon mansion - designed by the soon-to-be-ex-wife of Joss, and Nathan Fillion, the funniest Dogberry ever.

Posted by: Pete in TX at June 30, 2018 02:25 PM (2RBkF)

55 ..I admit the only one I really want to see is the one I'll probably have to wait the longest for, which is, Let It Be. Supposedly it won't come out until both Paul McCartney *and* Yoko are gone. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:14 PM I believe I had it on VHS many moons ago. It's a very happy upbeat movie.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:25 PM (SiINZ)

56 Also, regarding Joseph Fiennes, my elder son recommended I see Risen, which is about Christ's resurrection seen from the eyes of a Roman (I forget his title, Praetor, perhaps?) Anyway, this was not some kind of earnest but cheaply produced Kirk Cameron-style movie. It was wonderfully produced. Tom Felton (Draco Malfoy) was also featured. The man who played Yeshua is a Maori from New Zealand, but was very, very good at portraying Christ. Smiling, friendly, easily likable. After all, Jesus and his message might not have taken hold had he been awkward loser like, well, me.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:25 PM (EhZNT)

57 53 Movies I Saw This Week: ++++ Only two? What, you were goofing off instead? Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 30, 2018 07:25 PM (1F9jV) ===== So much writing. And having finished reading God Emperor of Dune, I'm finding reading enjoyable again.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:26 PM (Jj43a)

58 TheQuietMan, LOL. Yeah, it had a happy ending all right...

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:26 PM (eMKNe)

59 Orson Welles did all the fun things before becoming a world famous fatass - like boinking Rita Hayworth.

Posted by: kallisto at June 30, 2018 02:26 PM (Whlww)

60 TheJamesMadison, I have a netflix recommendation for you: The Last Hour. It's an Argentinian movie about the special group (GEIN) that went after the Shining Path. Good flick.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:26 PM (242Sa)

61 There's an exhibit of Kubrick's early Look photographs at the Museum of the City of New York. Boy could frame an image. Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 07:24 PM (pV/54) ------------------- Yes, there are some directors that can really frame a scene. I've watched some marginal films where the story was very meh, yet the filming and cinematography were incredible.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:27 PM (WEBkv)

62 After God Emperor of Doom, anything by Samatha Bee might seem okay.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 02:27 PM (grzBQ)

63 O with Julia Stiles holds the story line with modern adaptation well as far as I know. Don't think I ever read Shakespeare. Battery is all but done.

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 02:27 PM (pHfeF)

64 David Lean was also supposedly great with still photography. However, I've read that by the time Lean died, pretty much nobody in his family would speak to him anymore.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:28 PM (eMKNe)

65 30 My favorite Gilbert & Sullivan performance will always be Kelsey Grammer's as Sideshow Bob, in that Simpsons episode.

Mine was Vesti La Giubba.  Awesome. 

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2018 02:28 PM (T6t7i)

66 I think Brannagh's Hamlet is brilliant.  And it's one of a handful of 90's films that seemed poised to revive 70mm, until the combination of digital sound and IMAX theaters killed it forever.

But I had this one acting teacher who swore that Robin Williams' performance was the best in the film.  I just don't see it.  If anything, it seems like the most phoned-in performance.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 02:29 PM (SN4NF)

67 54 Joss Whedon may be a rotten human being with rotten politics, but his version of Much Ado About Nothing is fine. The two best points are: the setting - actually the Whedon mansion - designed by the soon-to-be-ex-wife of Joss, and Nathan Fillion, the funniest Dogberry ever. Posted by: Pete in TX at June 30, 2018 07:25 PM (2RBkF) -------------- Whedon's "A Cabin in the Woods" was gory and funny at the same time.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:29 PM (WEBkv)

68 62 After God Emperor of Doom, anything by Samatha Bee might seem okay. Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 07:27 PM (grzBQ) Dumb as the ending of God Emperor of Dune is, it's better than Chapterhouse. Or all of his kid's output. I tell you, it's a downward slope after the first Dune book.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:29 PM (xJa6I)

69 If you have not seen it, watch Charlton Heston's "Antony and Cleopatra".  Heston said it was the movie of which he was proudest.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgB2gh0azq0

Posted by: Mutnodjmet at June 30, 2018 02:29 PM (sPJyv)

70 IMHO, Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid had a very David Lean look. Every shot, especially the outdoors shots, is so pretty and perfect.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:29 PM (eMKNe)

71 My favorite Gilbert Sullivan performance will always be Kelsey Grammer's as Sideshow Bob, in that Simpsons episode. Mine was Vesti La Giubba. Awesome. Posted by: pep at June 30, 2018 07:28 PM (T6t7i) Ah, yes. Back when The Simpsons was fooking brilliant. Thank God I have those early seasons on DVD. Also, Kelsey Grammer is a true talent. Fuck Hollywood.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:30 PM (EhZNT)

72 67 54 Joss Whedon may be a rotten human being with rotten politics, but his version of Much Ado About Nothing is fine. The two best points are: the setting - actually the Whedon mansion - designed by the soon-to-be-ex-wife of Joss, and Nathan Fillion, the funniest Dogberry ever. Posted by: Pete in TX at June 30, 2018 07:25 PM (2RBkF) -------------- Whedon's "A Cabin in the Woods" was gory and funny at the same time. Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 07:29 PM (WEBkv) Yeah but it had an ending where the stoner and the final girl destroy the earth through selfishness. Made me mad.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:30 PM (xJa6I)

73 Speaking of movies, here's my latest animation.  It's a bit over 2 minutes.  Thanks for letting me post here, and thank you if you watch it.
http://tinyurl.com/y7suyc4y

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at June 30, 2018 02:30 PM (l9m7l)

74 Namely: Is it better to strive for faithfulness or to use the original work as a springboard for another artist's creativity? Faithfulness. If someone is going to do Shakespeare then it's offensive for them to think they could improve on it. If they were that good they could write their own great stories instead of having to sponge off someone else.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:30 PM (242Sa)

75 72 Yeah but it had an ending where the stoner and the final girl destroy the earth through selfishness. Made me mad. Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at June 30, 2018 07:30 PM (xJa6I) ====== It makes me laugh.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:30 PM (Jj43a)

76 22 I've always liked the killing-of-Desdemona scene from the CHEERS episode "Homicidal Ham" (1983). Diane: Help! Help! This psycho is trying is trying to kill me! Coach Ernie Pantusso: That's the first line of Shakespeare I ever understood! https://youtu.be/IkDBINb0wLg Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 07:18 PM (EzdLW) ++++ Kirstie Alley was a first class hottie, but the show was much funnier with Shelly Long.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 30, 2018 02:31 PM (1F9jV)

77 Pug, yup. Kelsey's big, but he should have been even bigger. He just never seemed to get a foothold in movies; everything he's known for is TV.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:31 PM (eMKNe)

78 Whedon's "A Cabin in the Woods" was gory and funny at the same time. Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman I thought it was the most original idea for a horror mashup in a very long time. I did NOT see it coming, but thinking "what is going on?". Until the reveal. But Whedon's kind of a twerp.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 02:31 PM (+Tibp)

79 If you have not seen it, watch Charlton Heston's "Antony and Cleopatra". Heston said it was the movie of which he was proudest. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgB2gh0azq0 Posted by: Mutnodjmet at June 30, 2018 07:29 PM (sPJyv) I think Heston was at his best in Khartoum.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:32 PM (242Sa)

80 Did. NOT. Like. Branagh's Hamlet. The setting and the casting choices completely ruined it for me. I didn't mind his reading, though he does tend to yell his lines (like he did in Henry V) but it didn't matter since the casting and setting had taken me so far out of the mindset that I didn't really care. Modern settings of Shakespeare can work if they don't take it too literally. My Own Private Idaho was kind of sort of Henry V and Falstaff and it worked. I don't think literal modern adaptations really work, for reasons I can't really articulate.

Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 02:32 PM (1FhAQ)

81 ...'Elsinore' Beer is a tell. Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at June 30, 2018 07:11 PM (a1v7v) so was the flying dog.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 02:32 PM (9q7Dl)

82 Blackadder Back and Forth as he meets and punches Shakespeare played by Colin Firth. Blackadder gives him a kick - "Oh...that is for Ken Branagh's endless uncut 4 hour version of "Hamlet. Who is Ken Branagh? I'll tell him, you've said that. And I think he will be very hurt."

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:32 PM (SiINZ)

83 Is not the top picture from "Shakespeare in Love"?

Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 02:32 PM (UwkGr)

84 Yes, there are some directors that can really frame a scene. I've watched some marginal films where the story was very meh, yet the filming and cinematography were incredible. Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 07:27 PM

Oddly enough, it describes Dario Argento perfectly.  On one hand, the man is a genius with the camera and lighting.  Almost savant-like.  But his tastes in movies runs strictly to the blood and boobs, and he doesn't like too much story getting in the way of his plots.  He's what would have happened if Federico Fellini had decided to make exploitation films.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 02:32 PM (SN4NF)

85 Orson Welles did all the fun things before becoming a world famous fatass - like boinking Rita Hayworth. Posted by: kallisto Once on The Tonight Show, Welles had been the 1st guest. Then Robert Blake came out and when he sat down he said "Mr. Welles.....you make Wimpy look skimpy". Welles said "I'm fat and you're ugly but I can diet."

Posted by: JT at June 30, 2018 02:33 PM (1VtXD)

86 Pug, yup. Kelsey's big, but he should have been even bigger. He just never seemed to get a foothold in movies; everything he's known for is TV. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:31 PM (eMKNe) Down Periscope was hilarious.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:33 PM (242Sa)

87 80 Modern settings of Shakespeare can work if they don't take it too literally. My Own Private Idaho was kind of sort of Henry V and Falstaff and it worked. I don't think literal modern adaptations really work, for reasons I can't really articulate. Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM (1FhAQ) ====== Here's my chance to be rude and pedantic: Wouldn't it be Henry IV?

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:33 PM (Jj43a)

88 If it hasn't already been mentioned , Mel Gibson's "Hamlet" is both truncated and superb. If you haven't seen it, check it out.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 02:33 PM (9q7Dl)

89 83 Is not the top picture from "Shakespeare in Love"? Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM (UwkGr) ====== Yup.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:33 PM (Jj43a)

90 ...'Elsinore' Beer is a tell. Posted by: OregonMuse, AoSHQ Thought Leader & Contributing Editor, Vanity Fair Magazine at June 30, 2018 07:11 PM (a1v7v) so was the flying dog. Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM (9q7Dl) See, I've always loved Strange Brew. But now I have to look for Shakespearean themes? Too much pressure. Might kind of wreck it for me. or not.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:34 PM (EhZNT)

91 But Whedon's kind of a twerp. Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 07:31 PM (+Tibp) --------------- Unfortunately I think Whedon is enough of a twerp that I'm not interested in supporting anything he does any more. Really sad, because the man does have talent.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:34 PM (WEBkv)

92 44 What would folks here say is the all-time best rock band movie? Some ideas for nominees: - A Hard Day's Night - Help! - Yellow Submarine - Tommy - The Song Remains The Same - Pink Floyd: The Wall ...I admit the only one I really want to see is the one I'll probably have to wait the longest for, which is, Let It Be. Supposedly it won't come out until both Paul McCartney *and* Yoko are gone. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:14 PM ++++ Almost Famous.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 30, 2018 02:34 PM (1F9jV)

93 Who is Ken Branagh? He was excellent in the HBO movie "Conspiracy". Deliciously evil.

Posted by: JT at June 30, 2018 02:34 PM (1VtXD)

94 David Lean deserves more love. I've never seen his early Brief Encounter, which I've heard touted as the greatest chick flick ever. I've seen his big flicks multiple times.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 02:34 PM (pV/54)

95 Ken Levine, at his blog, posted a great piece about inside jokes in TV episodes: "Slipping Inside Jokes Into Shows" http://kenlevine.blogspot.com/2018/06/slipping-inside-jokes-into-shows.html You can find my comment in there. I mentioned that in A Clockwork Orange, during the scene when Alex is seducing the teenage girls at the record store, there's a 2001 soundtrack album displayed on the wall between them.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:35 PM (eMKNe)

96 Third pic from the top reminds me of 'The Grand Budapest Hotel", which was probably a better movie

Posted by: Javems at June 30, 2018 02:35 PM (xgBZ9)

97 What would folks here say is the all-time best rock band movie? Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:14 PM Velvet Goldmine. Sid and Nancy.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:35 PM (242Sa)

98 94 David Lean deserves more love. I've never seen his early Brief Encounter, which I've heard touted as the greatest chick flick ever. I've seen his big flicks multiple times. Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 07:34 PM (pV/54) ===== Lawrence on the River Kwai?

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:35 PM (Jj43a)

99 Anon, hmmm. I've heard so many good things about that flick...

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:35 PM (eMKNe)

100 Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:31 PM (eMKNe) Down Periscope was hilarious. Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 07:33 PM (242Sa) Surprisingly funny. I watched it again just a couple months ago. what a fun movie.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:35 PM (EhZNT)

101 "Cabin In The Woods" is definitely nihilistic. "They're dicks! Let's destroy the world!" If you carry the metaphor through (of being an indictment of genre horror fans) what does that tell you about how the filmmakers feel about you? "Much Ado About Nothing" is terrific. I really had a high opinion of the Whedons when that came out. Whoops. http://moviegique.com/index.php/2013/06/27/much-ado-about-nothing/

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:36 PM (CcUfv)

102 Speaking of movies, here's my latest animation. It's a bit over 2 minutes. Thanks for letting me post here, and thank you if you watch it. http://tinyurl.com/y7suyc4y Posted by: BeckoningChasm at June 30, 2018 07:30 PM (l9m7l) Interesting. Is that what things are like on the other side?

Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 02:36 PM (T71PA)

103 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 02:36 PM (grzBQ)

104 There was a production of Coriolanus with Ralph Finnes that I really enjoyed. Although it was brought to modern times I thought it worked. Also, Richard III with Gandolph

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 02:36 PM (+Tibp)

105 If you have never watched the 3 man group " The Shakespeare Company" it is a must see because you will laugh until you pee.

Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (UwkGr)

106 qdpsteve -- "Let It Be" is a sad slog of a pic. Ringo has a moment or two. Best rock pic? Phantom of the Paradise?

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (CcUfv)

107 Primordial and Pug, I'll look for that one. Thanks.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (eMKNe)

108 I've always hated Shakespeare and probably always will. I've never understood why people make such a big deal of him. And yes, I studied him in both HS and college.

Posted by: Soona at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (zcozU)

109 Endora got her start in Orson's Mercury Theatre.

Posted by: kallisto at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (Whlww)

110 40 Oh and Shakespeare 'Truthers' are about as accurate and welcome as Never Trumpers and 9/11 Truthers are today. Some people just can't stand the idea of genius. Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at June 30, 2018 07:22 PM (xJa6I) It was Sir Francis Bacon's mistress's niece! I have proof on this strip of parchment from 1823!

Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (1FhAQ)

111 Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM I loved that!

Posted by: RedMindBlueState[/i][/b][/s][/u] at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (pew7u)

112 Laurence Olivier's Henry V and Hamlet are very good. I liked how Henry V started as a stage play morphed into a movie and ended as the stage play

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (SiINZ)

113 Heavy Metal.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (PUmDY)

114 Anna, that's easy. Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Great album, horrible movie.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:37 PM (eMKNe)

115 OT, but we are getting our sixth cloudburst of the day. No hail, this time, but plenty of rain. At least I won't have to water my lawn this week.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:38 PM (EhZNT)

116 I thought Zeffirelli did a great job with Romeo and Juliet.

Posted by: Maude at June 30, 2018 02:38 PM (EZebt)

117 Moviegique, seriously, that's what I've heard. The breakup of the Beatles, live and on stage!

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:38 PM (eMKNe)

118 I remember when I first saw 'Shakespeare in Love' at the theatre... Me and the educated Date were cracking up... there some very funny lines that, if you didn't know the Bard, you would not get... We were the only ones laughing at most of those... Was sad, really.

Posted by: Don Q at June 30, 2018 02:38 PM (NgKpN)

119 What would folks here say is the all-time best rock band movie?
Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:14 PM (eMKNe)

This is Spinal Tap.

Plenty of actual rock and rollers swear that this film is too real all too often.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 02:38 PM (SN4NF)

120 angry lib sock off

Posted by: San Franpsycho at June 30, 2018 02:38 PM (EZebt)

121 If you haven't seen the kookoobananas version of Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus", "Titus" starring Anthony Hopkins and directed by Julie Taymor- do so immediately. It is superb. Great visuals for once to go with the great wordsmithing by Shakespeare.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 02:39 PM (9q7Dl)

122 Primordial, good noms. Can't believe I forgot Sid & Nancy. I have the freakin' Criterion bluray.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:39 PM (eMKNe)

123 Coriolanus was terrific. http://moviegique.com/index.php/2012/02/10/coriolanus/

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:39 PM (CcUfv)

124 103 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time. Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 07:36 PM (grzBQ) ----------- "Hard Days Night" "Yellow Submarine"

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:39 PM (WEBkv)

125 "He was excellent in the HBO movie "Conspiracy"." For playing Reinhard Heydrich, who Hitler said had a "black heart." Anthropoid is a good recent flick about his assassination in Prague by ex-pat Chzek and Slovak commandos parachuted in by Churchill. Winston's deep game was that this would lead to harsh Nazi reprisals, and bring the locals back to the Good Side.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 02:39 PM (pV/54)

126 naturakfake, I remember that one. Heard it was bloody.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:39 PM (eMKNe)

127 Qdpsteven, have about Jem?

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 02:39 PM (grzBQ)

128 112 Laurence Olivier's Henry V and Hamlet are very good. I liked how Henry V started as a stage play morphed into a movie and ended as the stage play Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 07:37 PM (SiINZ) ===== My favorite Shakespeare film is probably Olivier's Richard III.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:40 PM (Jj43a)

129 I thought Zeffirelli did a great job with Romeo and Juliet.
Posted by: Maude at June 30, 2018 07:38 PM

Huh?  Wha?  I couldn't hear the Shakespeare over the sound of Olivia Hussey's tits knocking together.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 02:40 PM (SN4NF)

130 It is superb. Great visuals for once to go with the great wordsmithing by Shakespeare. Posted by: naturalfake THAT'S what I was trying to remember. Hannibal Lector and the Bard.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 02:40 PM (+Tibp)

131 I can definitely believe Yellow Submarine was horrible, unless you did a ton of LSD pre-show. Supposedly the band members were so lazy by that time, they wouldn't even do their own voices.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:40 PM (eMKNe)

132 If you haven't seen the kookoobananas version of Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus", "Titus" starring Anthony Hopkins and directed by Julie Taymor- do so immediately. It is superb. Great visuals for once to go with the great wordsmithing by Shakespeare. Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 07:39 PM (9q7Dl) That movie was demented. The only thing I remember about it was the chick with the twigs for hands. Then I turned it off.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:40 PM (242Sa)

133 121 If you haven't seen the kookoobananas version of Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus", "Titus" starring Anthony Hopkins and directed by Julie Taymor- do so immediately. It is superb. Great visuals for once to go with the great wordsmithing by Shakespeare. Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 07:39 PM (9q7Dl) ====== Ahhh, yes. Back when I thought Julie Taymor would develop into a quality filmmaker. That was good. She has made complete dreck ever since. Really disappointing.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:41 PM (Jj43a)

134 Anna, don't know that one. Will have to look it up. I saw The Runaways a few years ago, which was the story of Joan Jett and that band. Wasn't too bad.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:41 PM (eMKNe)

135 Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 07:40 PM (SN4NF) Since most of her outfits were low cut but rather tight there was no noise of "tits knocking together"

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2018 02:41 PM (AllCR)

136 Oh.... and have to add... Kiss me Kate... for adaptations...

Posted by: Don Q at June 30, 2018 02:42 PM (NgKpN)

137 132 That movie was demented. The only thing I remember about it was the chick with the twigs for hands. Then I turned it off. Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 07:40 PM (242Sa) ====== And it's one of the reasons some people think Christopher Marlow wrote it instead of Shakespeare.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 02:42 PM (Jj43a)

138 And who is up for watching again Forbidden Planet?

https://youtu.be/Gn1OMBK0Xfo

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 02:42 PM (grzBQ)

139 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time. Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 07:36 PM (grzBQ) What We Do Is Secret

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:43 PM (242Sa)

140 Some people just can't stand the idea of genius. Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at June 30, 2018 07:22 PM About as bad as the "[insert historical figure here] was gay!!!11!!" crowd.

Posted by: RedMindBlueState[/i][/b][/s][/u] at June 30, 2018 02:43 PM (pew7u)

141 Better a Moop than a Moogle. Or a Muggle for that matter... Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 07:21 PM (grzBQ) Or a Mook. We don't pay mooks....... Fat Richie had a mean right cross.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 30, 2018 02:43 PM (EoRCO)

142 I also recently, at FB, saw that someone did a series of comic strips: If each great/famous/infamous director was a chef, what would they serve you for dinner? Steven Spielberg's was basically Thanksgiving dinner; Tim Burton's was mystery meat where everything was coated in the same murky mysterious sauce; Uwe Boll's was pop-tarts filled with his own diarrhea. But Stanley Kubrick was missing. I guess that Kubrick's meal would be, delicious fish and chips-- drenched in salt.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:43 PM (eMKNe)

143 I plan on seeing Sicario. I just love watching Benny the Bull. He has that 'it' that cameras love.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 02:43 PM (vV/gB)

144 Endora got her start in Orson's Mercury Theatre. Posted by: kallisto Agnes Moorehead ? Hmmm... I never knew that.

Posted by: JT at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (1VtXD)

145 And who is up for watching again Forbidden Planet? Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) I'm waiting for Svengoolie. And don't call me Shirley.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (+Tibp)

146 Qdpsteve, don't worry about it. A horrible repackage of A Star is Born misusing characters from Jem and the Holograms.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (grzBQ)

147 qdpsteve -- You have not heard wrong about "Let It Be". But "Yellow Submarine" wasn't about lazy. They just weren't into it at that point. They were basically broken up by that time, just not saying anything. As for "Yellow Submarine," you just had to be a kid in the '70s when literally NOTHING ELSE WAS ON to appreciate it.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (CcUfv)

148 I think Heston was at his best in Khartoum. Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM (242Sa) Now, I love "Khartoum" but there's no denying that it does drag quite a bit. Easily could use 30 minutes. And they never show the scene where the Muslims are parading around with 'Chinese' Gordon's head anymore. BOOOOOOOO! Laurence Olivier makes a great Mahdi as well.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (9q7Dl)

149 73. I will check it out when I'm on a real computer. this phone is terrible.

Posted by: kallisto at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (Whlww)

150 Since most of her outfits were low cut but rather tight there was no noise of "tits knocking together" Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2018 07:41 PM

There was though... in my mind.  So loud I couldn't concentrate on anything.  Being in Junior High and having a thing for large gazongas may have played a small part.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (SN4NF)

151 Anna, oh yuck. Sounds even worse than Mariah Carey's Glitter. (Which, interestedly enough, came out on 9/11.)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:44 PM (eMKNe)

152 But Stanley Kubrick was missing. I guess that Kubrick's meal would be, delicious fish and chips-- drenched in salt. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:43 PM (eMKNe) Nah... Kubrick would be an 87 course meal... with every course Looking different, but tasting exactly the same...

Posted by: Don Q at June 30, 2018 02:45 PM (NgKpN)

153 'I'm waiting for Svengoolie.' It's "Leech Woman" again. Now there's a movie that cries out for a remake.

Posted by: f'd at June 30, 2018 02:45 PM (UdKB7)

154 And they never show the scene where the Muslims are parading around with 'Chinese' Gordon's head anymore. BOOOOOOOO! Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 07:44 PM (9q7Dl) Damn! I never saw a version with that.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:45 PM (242Sa)

155 I can definitely believe Yellow Submarine was horrible, unless you did a ton of LSD pre-show. Supposedly the band members were so lazy by that time, they wouldn't even do their own voices. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:40 PM (eMKNe) I agree, it's not a good movie but I think they just didn't want anything to do with the cartoon. When it was done and they saw it they decided to film a brief bit at the end of it. The only part of the movie worth watching

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:45 PM (SiINZ)

156 Supposedly the band members were so lazy by that time, they wouldn't even do their own voices. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:40 PM (eMKNe) ----------------- Heard an interview with one of the Monkees, years ago, I want to say it was Peter Tork, who talked about being invited to a studio session with the Beatles. He said he thought, "Beatles, cool" so, went to the studio wearing beads, hippy clothing, dropped some acid..arrives...and the Beatles are all wearing suits, very professional and working their way through recording various tracks of their upcoming album. Interview was hilarious.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:46 PM (WEBkv)

157 Offbeat stuff worth seeing: "The Ipcress File", mid 60s spy movie, Michael Caine's first starring role. Holds up pretty well except for some brief special effects. Available on DVD from Amazon. "Good for nothing", recent indy western, memorable main characters. Visually beautiful. Available on Amazon. "Twin Peaks" the 2017 Showtime continuation. Watched all 16 episodes. Fast forwarded through some hokey special effects, but otherwise worth at least 14 of the 16 hours.

Posted by: Frankly at June 30, 2018 02:46 PM (OZAbV)

158 movieguiqe, sounds about right. :-) That's how I discovered Mad Monster Party. Back in the good ol' pre-cable days, independent stations used to specialize in playing family movies on weekends.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:46 PM (eMKNe)

159 Anna Puma -- Any time, any day. "What's a bathing suit?" http://moviegique.com/index.php/2016/10/11/forbidden-planet-1956/

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:46 PM (CcUfv)

160 Leslie Nielsen gives the most wooden performance of all time in Forbidden Planet. But I'd be wooden too, hanging around Anne Francis.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 02:46 PM (pV/54)

161 *scrubs assiduously, but fruitlessly, at spot*

Posted by: Lady MacBeth at June 30, 2018 02:46 PM (TO2gJ)

162 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time. Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 07:36 PM Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:46 PM (EzdLW)

163 Don Q, sounds like you're not a fan of Stanley's?

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:47 PM (eMKNe)

164 velvet goldmine was very good

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 02:47 PM (PUmDY)

165 But Stanley Kubrick was missing. I guess that Kubrick's meal would be, delicious fish and chips-- drenched in salt. -------------------------- Kubrick was a master. I would suggest something more involved. Maybe a roasted swan. David Lean would offer you eight gourmet courses. Dinner would last forever.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 02:47 PM (vV/gB)

166 TQM, I didn't know about that. Blake, that sounds like a great comedy sketch. Wow. :-)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:47 PM (eMKNe)

167 Puddin Head, agreed about David Lean. *He* would be the guy with 87 courses.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:48 PM (eMKNe)

168 Rosenkrantz and Gildenstern Are Dead *drops mic*

Posted by: Sharkman at June 30, 2018 02:48 PM (fRQju)

169 144. Yes, she was a serious actress and then did quite a bit of work on the great radio dramas before landing that sweet TV gig.

Posted by: kallisto at June 30, 2018 02:48 PM (Whlww)

170 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time. Head (196 (unless you're totally wasted, or a Monkees completist, I suppose )

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:49 PM (EzdLW)

171 Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 07:46 PM (EzdLW) ----------------- I completely forgot about that one. I remember the part where they got their talisman to float toward them...and you could see the freaking strings. That was some awful movie making. And, considering time in which the film was made, that's really saying something.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:49 PM (WEBkv)

172 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time.


200 Motels

Posted by: tu3031 at June 30, 2018 02:49 PM (O5Q3r)

173 (196 = (1968 ) far out

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:49 PM (EzdLW)

174 qdpsteve -- Oh, lord I remember MMP. "Francesca!" The guy, now that I think about it, was kind of doing a Jimmy Stewart voice. I got that for The Boy as a kid but by 2000 there wasn't much appeal in a cheesy stop-motion fest.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:49 PM (CcUfv)

175 Hands, I actually want to see Head. :-) tu3031, hmm, interesting. I've read various things about 200 Motels.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:50 PM (eMKNe)

176 "The Ipcress File", mid 60s spy movie, Michael Caine's first starring role. Holds up pretty well except for some brief special effects. Available on DVD from Amazon. I love that movie and can never remember which one is the double agent in it. Michael Caine had 3 solid movies in a row at that time. Zulu 1964, Ipcress File 1965 and Alfie 1966. I even liked the second Harry Palmer movie, Funeral in Berlin from 1966 too but it's not as good as Ipcress File

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:50 PM (SiINZ)

177 Also....you can get this one at B&N's Criterion Collection sale going on now. "MacBeth" directed by Roman Polanski. Yes, yes, I know but this was made right after Polanski's wife, Sharon Tate, was horribly murdered by Charles Manson's psycho cult members- and, man, did he have some demons to exorcise. A bloody, gorey, old nekkid witch horror show. Excellent version.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 02:50 PM (9q7Dl)

178 I just saw Roadie, which must have been Meat Loaf's first movie. It was pretty good. Kind of hokey but I liked it.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:51 PM (242Sa)

179 Polanski did a vampire flick I quite liked. Can't remember the name, but it was a romp.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 02:51 PM (vV/gB)

180 Ask the average man who wrote the plays entitled Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, King Lear, and Othello, and in most cases he'll snap confidently back with, "The Immortal Bard of Stratford on Avon." Ask him about the authorship of the Shakespearean sonnets and see if you don't get the same illogical reply. Now put these questions to certain literary detectives who seem to crop up every now and again over the years and don't be surprised if you get answers like Sir Francis Bacon, Ben Jonson, Queen Elizabeth and possibly even the Homestead Act. The most recent of these theories is to be found in a book I have just read that attempts to prove conclusively that the real author of Shakespeare's works was Christopher Marlowe. The book makes a very convincing case, and when I got through reading it I was not sure if Shakespeare was Marlowe or Marlowe was Shakespeare or what. I know this, I would not have cashed checks for either one of them - and I like their work. Now, in trying to keep the above mentioned theory in perspective, my first question is: if Marlowe wrote Shakespeare's works, who wrote Marlowe's? The answer to this lies in the fact that Shakespeare was married to a woman named Anne Hathaway. This we know to be factual. However, under the new theory, it is actually Marlowe who was married to Anne Hathaway, a match which caused Shakespeare no end of grief, as they would not let him in the house. -Woody Allen, Without Feathers

Posted by: J. J. Abrams at June 30, 2018 02:51 PM (/qEW2)

181 naturalfake, thanks for reminding me of that. Think I might pick up Criterion's edition of Election for 20 bucks at B&N.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (eMKNe)

182 121 If you haven't seen the kookoobananas version of Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus", "Titus" starring Anthony Hopkins and directed by Julie Taymor- do so immediately. It is superb. Great visuals for once to go with the great wordsmithing by Shakespeare. Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 07:39 PM (9q7Dl) I saw that on hotel cable while down with a nasty fever (which has my gall bladder telling me it was time to part ways). That was a hallucinogenic experience.

Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (1FhAQ)

183 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time. 200 Motels Posted by: tu3031 at June 30, 2018 07:49 PM (O5Q3r) Head. Hey Monkees, here's an idea make a movie knocking the TV show that made you famous and make it really boring

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (SiINZ)

184 Hands, I actually want to see Head. :-) Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:50 PM[/i I showed a clip from Head in my class project in Introduction to Music class in junior college!

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (EzdLW)

185 Out, out, damned sock.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (/qEW2)

186 172 Lets flip that one of its head - Worst Rock Band Movies of All Time. 200 Motels ----------------------- Come on, watching Frank torture the lead guitarist about wanting to be RnRoller was perfect.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (vV/gB)

187 .

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (EzdLW)

188 I suggest that we expand things a bit.  How about best soundtrack of all time.  IMHO, I think The Mask has one of the best ever made.

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2018 02:52 PM (T6t7i)

189 Moorehead got her first Oscar nom for Welles "The Magnificent Ambersons"--but she got her =fourth= nomination contemporaneously with "Bewitched" for "Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte".

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:53 PM (CcUfv)

190 Some say that the basic plot of Forbidden Planet is lifted from Shakespeare's Tempest.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 02:53 PM (pV/54)

191 How aboat "The Idiot" staring Donold Truump !!!!!

Posted by: Mary Clogginstien from Brattleboro, VT at June 30, 2018 02:53 PM (qM84C)

192 Polanski did a vampire flick I quite liked. Can't remember the name, but it was a romp. Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 07:51 PM (vV/gB) The Fearless Vampire Killers

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 02:53 PM (SiINZ)

193 179 Polanski did a vampire flick I quite liked. Can't remember the name, but it was a romp. Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 07:51 PM (vV/gB) ------------------- without looking it up, I want to say, "Fearless Vampire Killers" and Sharon Tate was in it.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:53 PM (WEBkv)

194 87 80 Modern settings of Shakespeare can work if they don't take it too literally. My Own Private Idaho was kind of sort of Henry V and Falstaff and it worked. I don't think literal modern adaptations really work, for reasons I can't really articulate. Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM (1FhAQ) ====== Here's my chance to be rude and pedantic: Wouldn't it be Henry IV? Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 07:33 PM (Jj43a) Dang. Google tells me you're absolutely right. I stand corrected.

Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 02:53 PM (1FhAQ)

195 TQM, that's the down side. I've read Head was pretty much plotless, plus the Monkees were sick of being the Monkees by that time.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:53 PM (eMKNe)

196 190 Some say that the basic plot of Forbidden Planet is lifted from Shakespeare's Tempest. Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 07:53 PM (pV/54) Some are right.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:54 PM (xJa6I)

197 Roman Polanski's "vampire romp" was "The Fearless Vampire Killers". Keep in mind he was cheating on Ms. Tate when she was murdered.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:54 PM (CcUfv)

198 I think same director, but the I'm Not There Dylan movie was very good.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 02:54 PM (PUmDY)

199 Polanski did a vampire flick I quite liked. Can't remember the name, but it was a romp. Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 07:51 PM The Fearless Vampire Killers

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 02:55 PM (EzdLW)

200 I suggest that we expand things a bit. How about best soundtrack of all time. IMHO, I think The Mask has one of the best ever made. Posted by: pep at June 30, 2018 07:52 PM (T6t7i) The best soundtrack (score) of all time was clearly Gladiator.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 02:55 PM (242Sa)

201 plus the Monkees were sick of being the Monkees by that time.

Well, given how big they all were post-Monkees, can you blame them?

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2018 02:55 PM (T6t7i)

202 Ringo and Keith Moon are in 200 Motels. Also Theodore Bickle. I don't know that it's the worst but it is definitely the oddest

Posted by: f'd at June 30, 2018 02:55 PM (UdKB7)

203 Hands: groovy, man. ;-) I very much wish I could show my co-workers some classic flicks. I'd especially like to show them Picnic At Hanging Rock, and The Conversation. I just showed my sister and bro-in-law The Conversation, btw. I can't believe it but THEY DIDN'T LIKE IT VERY MUCH. Thought it was too slow, among other things. Aaarrgghh!

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:55 PM (eMKNe)

204 Muse I'm a yuuge fan of Olivier's Richard III (1955), which includes certain bits from Henry VI. I think it's a masterpiece. On a different topic, I've discovered I can get far more movies I want to watch on Amazon Prime than on Netflix. Good luck finding John Ford's films Stagecoach & The Informer on Netflix! Or most of the recent Academy Award nominees for Best Foreign Film. Amazon has everything, although many are not included in the basic AP membership-- most cost $4 to view.

Posted by: strawdog at June 30, 2018 02:55 PM (Cssks)

205 pep, oh yeah. They set the world on fire! ;-)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:56 PM (eMKNe)

206 I watched Hot Fuzz last night...the Romeo and Juliet play within a play was pretty good. I dig Lucy Punch, she looks like a girl i had a crush on in high school. And now I just realized the genius of Hot Fuzz, what with the death toll.

Posted by: Big Fat Meanie at June 30, 2018 02:56 PM (2DbS4)

207 The best soundtrack (score) of all time was clearly Gladiator.

That is a very good one.  For classical music, it's 2001.  Clockwork Orange also had some very good stuff.

Posted by: pep at June 30, 2018 02:56 PM (T6t7i)

208 The best soundtrack (score) of all time was clearly Gladiator. Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 07:55 PM (242Sa) I concur. Black Hawk Down was another personal favorite.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 02:56 PM (EhZNT)

209 Just saw "From Dusk Till Dawn" (1996) in the theater again. Holds up surprisingly well. I mention it because I LOVE that soundtrack.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:56 PM (CcUfv)

210 For a great, tremendously fun movie inspired by Shakespeare's plays, check out- "Theater of Blood" starring Vincent Price as Edward Lionheart, a demented Shakespearean actor who is using the murders in Shakespeare's plays to muder the critics who scorned him. Also, starring a delicious Diana Ring as his daughter. Great script. Great Fun. Loaded to the gills with great English actors. Price is a hoot. A great, truly great horror comedy.

Posted by: naturalfake at June 30, 2018 02:57 PM (9q7Dl)

211 pep, yep, by Walter-- oops, make that Wendy Carlos. :-P

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 02:57 PM (eMKNe)

212 Also, I think a modern-day version of Much Ado (like Whedon's) works better than modern-day versions of other Shakespeare plays, because it's actually written in prose. Fancy, late 16th century prose, but prose nonetheless.

Posted by: Pete in TX at June 30, 2018 02:57 PM (2RBkF)

213 Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, and Agnes Moorehead in Mrs. Parkington.

https://youtu.be/DuGrmgOD16k

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 02:57 PM (grzBQ)

214 The best soundtrack (score) of all time was clearly Gladiator. I always think of Last of the Mohicans and Black Hawk Down.. Plus Patton.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 02:57 PM (+Tibp)

215 Did anyone see Satyricon by Fellini? That was some weird but enjoyable shit there. Then, as memory serves, there was Behind the Green Door. I have these two movies connected because I saw them at the same theater. It had a very sticky floor.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 02:58 PM (vV/gB)

216 Another excellent rock movie is Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii. But, make sure you watch the original 62 minute version. There are two other versions, 85 and 92 minutes. Both have extra added crap that just slows the film down. The original contains all of the material that was recorded at Pompeii. The added crap in the other two is lame stuff from the studio, interviews, etc.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 30, 2018 02:58 PM (1F9jV)

217 Please, best soundtrack, by far, was "Amadeus." With "Immortal Beloved" a close second.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 02:58 PM (WEBkv)

218 140 Some people just can't stand the idea of genius. Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at June 30, 2018 07:22 PM About as bad as the "[insert historical figure here] was gay!!!11!!" crowd. Posted by: RedMindBlueState at June 30, 2018 07:43 PM (pew7u) Agreed

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:58 PM (xJa6I)

219 thought it was going to be about the movie(s) titled To Be or Not To Be. The one Mel Brooks did is classic! Posted by: Rosasharn at June 30, 2018 07:22 PM Which was a remake of the Jack Benny version.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 30, 2018 02:58 PM (IqV8l)

220 142 I also recently, at FB, saw that someone did a series of comic strips: If each great/famous/infamous director was a chef, what would they serve you for dinner? Steven Spielberg's was basically Thanksgiving dinner; Tim Burton's was mystery meat where everything was coated in the same murky mysterious sauce; Uwe Boll's was pop-tarts filled with his own diarrhea. But Stanley Kubrick was missing. I guess that Kubrick's meal would be, delicious fish and chips-- drenched in salt. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 07:43 PM (eMKNe) I'll box that faggit anywhere, anytime... Even on the baseball ground.

Posted by: Uwe Boll at June 30, 2018 02:58 PM (Q9ugn)

221 There is a marvelous Yugoslav (yes, Yugoslav) film entitled "The Village Production of Hamlet." Real life intrudes into the quaint production of Hamlet!

Posted by: strawdog at June 30, 2018 02:59 PM (Cssks)

222 Behind the Green Door is still pretty hot.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards [/b][/i] at June 30, 2018 02:59 PM (xJa6I)

223 Modern settings of Shakespeare can work if they don't take it too literally. My Own Private Idaho was kind of sort of Henry V and Falstaff and it worked. I don't think literal modern adaptations really work, for reasons I can't really articulate. Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM (1FhAQ) I really enjoy Much Ado About Nothing which is set in modern times. I couldn't watch the Leonardo DiCaprio version Romeo & Juliette set in modern times. I don't know why I hate it but I do.

Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 02:59 PM (T71PA)

224 "Hot Fuzz" is terrific. Strawdog, the "included" movie packages for the major services are terrible, no doubt. Amazon is better than Netflix in terms of classics and oddities but Amazon isn't great. Both suck for finding things. Amazon just wants to sell, sell, sell. I don't know what Netflix's excuse is. TCM claims to be working on a channel.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 02:59 PM (CcUfv)

225 I couldn't watch the Leonardo DiCaprio version Romeo & Juliette set in modern times. I don't know why I hate it but I do. Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 07:59 PM (T71PA) -------------- I think I've isolated the problem.

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 03:00 PM (WEBkv)

226 Purple Rain was awesome

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 03:00 PM (PUmDY)

227 And I thought wrong. Curses pixy!

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 03:01 PM (WEBkv)

228 If each great/famous/infamous director was a chef, what would they serve you for dinner? Roger Corman would serve one of those dishes the waiter has to light on fire.

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 03:01 PM (EzdLW)

229 Ace has been ghost writing again.

Posted by: Dick at June 30, 2018 03:01 PM (SRarZ)

230 I saw a clip of Keith Moon accepting some award on behalf of the Beatles not sure for what. Any way he tells the audience there is an open invitation to anyone of their (the Beatles) houses and that the best looking in the audience will be selected to go there for a late luncheon and early breakfast. He then rolls head over heels on the stage and runs off

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 03:01 PM (SiINZ)

231 Just saw that Midnight Express is on TCM late tonight. That movie scarred me.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 03:01 PM (+Tibp)

232 Cosmic, uh okay. I admit I like the album much better.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:01 PM (eMKNe)

233 207 The best soundtrack (score) of all time was clearly Gladiator. That is a very good one. For classical music, it's 2001. Clockwork Orange also had some very good stuff. ---------------------- How about Barry Lyndon?

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 03:01 PM (vV/gB)

234 I enjoyed the Branagh Hamlet. IMO, the commentary is well worth listening to; he discusses character choices and scene settings a great deal, which sheds a good deal of light on why he made the film the way he did. And Derek Jacobi as Claudius is a master class in how to speak Elizabethan blank verse.

Posted by: Brian Swisher at June 30, 2018 03:02 PM (82KP/)

235 224 "Hot Fuzz" is terrific. Strawdog, the "included" movie packages for the major services are terrible, no doubt. Amazon is better than Netflix in terms of classics and oddities but Amazon isn't great. Both suck for finding things. Amazon just wants to sell, sell, sell. I don't know what Netflix's excuse is. TCM claims to be working on a channel. Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 07:59 PM (CcUfv) ====== Because studios want their own streaming services. Because Netflix is now in the original programming business, not the distribution business. I've never been a huge fan of the streaming service, but I still love their DVD service. 10,000 ish movies versus a few hundred steamed.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:02 PM (Jj43a)

236 Theater of Blood is certainly a trip... a very mod trip in some ways.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 03:03 PM (grzBQ)

237 How about rock movie you desperately want to see but can't?

Cocksucker Blues.

Google it.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 03:03 PM (SN4NF)

238 Purple Rain actually had a compelling story.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (PUmDY)

239 TJMP-- I don't own a DVD player. I buy DVDs and then download them, torrent-style.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (CcUfv)

240 Rusty Nail, I believe that was one of Mick Jagger's productions. Could be wrong though.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (eMKNe)

241 "Rude Boy" was confusing, but fun. England 1978-80. They didn't realize that they were documenting the last vestiges of a now defunct country.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (EoRCO)

242 I always loved Zorba the Greek. B&W. Can't even imagine it being made in color.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (vV/gB)

243 Purple Rain was awesome Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 08:00 PM (PUmDY) ------ Yes, yes it was. Apollonia was hotter than the Sun in that.

Posted by: Calm Mentor at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (I16G8)

244 Best soundtrack ... Superfly. My man Curtis.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (pV/54)

245 The soundtrack for The Third Man lingers... that zither music, you know. moviegique Thx. Netflix is truly irritating. I don't mind paying up, but I very much mind not being able to FIND famous films at all. I would be interested in the TCM service.

Posted by: strawdog at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (Cssks)

246 237 How about rock movie you desperately want to see but can't? Cocksucker Blues. Google it. Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 08:03 PM (SN4NF) ++++ It's available on the torrent sites.

Posted by: Anon Y. Mous at June 30, 2018 03:04 PM (1F9jV)

247 I always loved Zorba the Greek. B&W. Can't even imagine it being made in color. Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter I think that about America, America.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 03:05 PM (+Tibp)

248 Roger Corman would serve one of those dishes the waiter has to light on fire.

What everyone wants as their main dish - Screaming Audrey... watch those tendrils flail until they are nice and crisp. Don't forget the vinaigrette. And tip the waitress.

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 03:05 PM (grzBQ)

249 I like Branaugh's "Much Ado About Nothing" and the 1996 "Twelfth Night or What You Will" - haven't seen any of the Hamlet movies (hangs head in shame).

Posted by: Lizzy[/i] at June 30, 2018 03:05 PM (W+vEI)

250 "Hot Fuzz" is terrific. Simon Pegg does good movies, for the most part. My son told me that Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and The World's End are a trilogy. I'll take his word for it. I am far less inclined to seek out deeper themes in movies, just as in art in general. I like what I like, and that's as deep as it goes. When I was taking art classes, the worst part of any assignment was trying to deliver some kind of fucking theme or emotion as to why I created the piece. "I dunno. I like ants. And drawing it really big made it easier to do detail work. Gall! Leave me alone!" Lord I hate talking art.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 03:05 PM (EhZNT)

251 247 I always loved Zorba the Greek. B&W. Can't even imagine it being made in color. Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter I think that about America, America. -------------------- The Last Picture Show? Left me a sweet and sour timeless feeling.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 03:06 PM (vV/gB)

252 Anna: you eat it... and then it eats you. ;-)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:06 PM (eMKNe)

253 239 TJMP-- I don't own a DVD player. I buy DVDs and then download them, torrent-style. Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 08:04 PM (CcUfv) ===== To each his own, but I'll never stop wanting to actually have and use the physical media. You already rely on so much technology to watch a movie, that adding either internet connections or a hard drive is just one step too far for me. I guess I'm the kind of guy who would rent 35mm prints if I had the means.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:06 PM (Jj43a)

254 And what would John Waters serve? Why, a shit sandwich, of course.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 03:07 PM (pV/54)

255 Trump at a rally mentioned that David Lynch is saying good things about his administration. Trump joked he'll never work again.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 03:07 PM (+Tibp)

256 The best musical scores are those that perfectly support the action on screen without drawing too much attention to themselves.  If a score becomes a "character" in the movie, it's usually a marginal movie that had to be "saved" by an obviously manipulative score.

My favorite scores are just about anything from Jerry Goldsmith (RIP).  The guy was a musical chameleon and could score anything while sounding nothing like what he had done before.  He is missed.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 03:07 PM (SN4NF)

257 **getting off TJM's lawn**

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 03:07 PM (EzdLW)

258 Qdpsteve, circle of life man...

Posted by: Anna Puma (HQCaR) at June 30, 2018 03:07 PM (grzBQ)

259 TJM, I'm the same way. I want something I can hold in my hands. I believe pre-video/VHS/Beta, it wasn't uncommon for wealthy people to buy 35mm prints of films. I've read that Carol Burnett had her own print made of Citizen Kane.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:07 PM (eMKNe)

260 A Shakespearian movie I've just seen recently (it was not available for many years) is "The Chimes at Midnight", directed and arranged by Orson Welles. It is the story of Shakespeare's anti-hero Falstaff, and is a very interesting approach because Welles weaves together pieces of Henry IV, parts 1 & 2, Henry V, and bits from other plays. Nevertheless, his arrangement is perfect, and it is almost unheard of to see someone do a complete rearranging of Shakespeare and have it work so well. (He does use all Original dialogue, though, he doesn't mess with that) I'm going to say that I think this is the best film adaptation of Shakespeare that I've ever seen, and is arguably the best film Orson Welles ever directed, even though few have seen it.

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 30, 2018 03:08 PM (V2Yro)

261 Ignoramus, I fear you are correct about that.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:08 PM (eMKNe)

262 Thanks, Don Q, for the nod to "Kiss Me Kate." For the unititiated, check out the lyrics to "Brush Up Your Shakespeare." A sample-- With the wife of the British ambassida Try a crack out of "Troilus and Cressida" If she says she won't buy it or like it Make her tike it, what's more As You Like It If she says your behavior is heinous Kick her right in the Coriolanus Brush up your Shakespeare And they'll all kow-tow On the full vs. edited version of Shakespeare, I can't answer definitively. Love Strange Brew, Henry V and Hamlet (Branagh), plus all kinds of other adaptations of the basic story lines. IMO, Shakespeare is so timeless, only the quality of the adaptation matters--not the faithfulness.

Posted by: Art Rondolet of Malmsey at June 30, 2018 03:09 PM (S+f+m)

263 231 Blutarski It is a brilliant film! As a result of seeing Midnight Express, I read a lot about the real William Hayes. He turned out OK! He wrote, "After my experience, I joined AA & Triple A, & I go through life now double-knit!"

Posted by: strawdog at June 30, 2018 03:09 PM (Cssks)

264 I've read that Carol Burnett had her own print made of Citizen Kane. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 08:07 PM (eMKNe) -------------- Good grief, talk about added value as a collectors item!

Posted by: Blake - used bridge salesman at June 30, 2018 03:09 PM (WEBkv)

265 As a kid I watched Journey to the Center of the Earth three full times and was yanked out of the theater on the fourth showing cuz my mom called the theater. Man, I was seven and was I ever impressed by a movie. Tried to watch the remake and couldn't do it. Cheesy. The other movie that blew my mind at seven was Spartacus. Is it gay to like a gladiator flick?

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 03:09 PM (vV/gB)

266 259 TJM, I'm the same way. I want something I can hold in my hands. I believe pre-video/VHS/Beta, it wasn't uncommon for wealthy people to buy 35mm prints of films. I've read that Carol Burnett had her own print made of Citizen Kane. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 08:07 PM (eMKNe) ====== I know that Tarantino does it.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:11 PM (Jj43a)

267 Pug Mahon -- The Cornetto Trilogy is a trilogy only in the sense that it's the same director and main stars (as well as some recurring secondary cast). They are completely different in theme, tone, and the characters the actors play. And they all eat "cornettos" at some point. Cornettos are what Americans call "drumsticks" ice cream.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 03:11 PM (CcUfv)

268 256 The best musical scores are those that perfectly support the action on screen without drawing too much attention to themselves. If a score becomes a "character" in the movie, it's usually a marginal movie that had to be "saved" by an obviously manipulative score." I'll give you one score that becomes a "character" in the movie, and is so outstanding that it not only makes the entire movie, it inspires me to sit down and watch it all the way through whenever I run into it - lost count of how often I've seen it, and it's for the music alone - O Brother, where Art Thou?

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 30, 2018 03:11 PM (V2Yro)

269 237 How about rock movie you desperately want to see but can't? Cocksucker Blues. Google it. Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 08:03 PM (SN4NF) Part 1 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FQeZPrQFwlk Part 2 https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qayYbvrPaRI Yes they work. You're welcome!

Posted by: MC Honey Mustard at June 30, 2018 03:11 PM (Q9ugn)

270 Is it gay to like a gladiator flick? Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 08:09 PM

Have you ever spent time in a Turkish prison?

Posted by: Captain Over at June 30, 2018 03:11 PM (SN4NF)

271 The other movie that blew my mind at seven was Spartacus. Is it gay to like a gladiator flick? Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 08:09 PM (vV/gB) Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmm......No.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 30, 2018 03:12 PM (EoRCO)

272 260 A Shakespearian movie I've just seen recently (it was not available for many years) is "The Chimes at Midnight", directed and arranged by Orson Welles. It is the story of Shakespeare's anti-hero Falstaff, and is a very interesting approach because Welles weaves together pieces of Henry IV, parts 1 & 2, Henry V, and bits from other plays. Nevertheless, his arrangement is perfect, and it is almost unheard of to see someone do a complete rearranging of Shakespeare and have it work so well. (He does use all Original dialogue, though, he doesn't mess with that) I'm going to say that I think this is the best film adaptation of Shakespeare that I've ever seen, and is arguably the best film Orson Welles ever directed, even though few have seen it. Posted by: Tom Servo at June 30, 2018 08:08 PM (V2Yro) ====== I think it's Welles' best film. For those with long memories, I highlighted it in a thread about a year ago.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:12 PM (Jj43a)

273 How about rock movie you desperately want to see but can't? Cocksucker Blues. Google it. Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 08:03 PM (SN4NF) I'm pretty sure that one of the MTV stations runs it. But it's retitled Ladies and Gentlemen the Rolling Stones...

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 03:12 PM (SiINZ)

274 Puddin Head: it's not gay to love a gladiator flick as long as it's directed by Stanley fcukin' Kubrick. ;-)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:13 PM (eMKNe)

275 "The Hollow Crown" was really good. Ben Wishaw is a brilliant actor despite being Q.

Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 03:13 PM (UwkGr)

276 TJMP -- I have all the physical media. My oldest is brain-injured and I cannot keep her from destroying the physical media, if it's out. The studios are absolutely certain about their rights to keep you from copying anything and have zero interest in replacing any copy that might be damaged for anything less than the full retail price so...I adapt. Personally, my video consumption is almost exclusively limited to "what's in the theater" so my motivation is basically for things to be available for others to view. Otherwise, I too would run 35mm cans out of a clackety-clack projector.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 03:13 PM (CcUfv)

277 I guess I'm the kind of guy who would rent 35mm prints if I had the means. Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 08:06 PM (Jj43a) *fistbump* I have an embarrassingly large DVD collection. I am currently running a game of sorts where I watch a movie, then use an actor in that movie to move on to the next. the rule is it has to be a movie I currently possess on DVD or BluRay. I am nearing 300 movies, and have 200 more to go. (again, embarrassingly large collection). Funny thing is I find myself stuck in types, or genres. Right now I am hip deep in Judd Apatow-land. Lots and lots of Jason Segel, Leslie Mann, and Jonah Hill. I shall power through.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 03:14 PM (EhZNT)

278 275 "The Hollow Crown" was really good. Ben Wishaw is a brilliant actor despite being Q. Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 08:13 PM (UwkGr) ====== I've been wanting to watch that for a while. Maybe I should just break down and go to the "library" to get myself a copy.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:14 PM (Jj43a)

279 'Is it gay to like a gladiator flick?' Did a tingle run up your leg?

Posted by: Chris Matthews at June 30, 2018 03:14 PM (UdKB7)

280 As a kid I watched Journey to the Center of the Earth three full times and was yanked out of the theater on the fourth showing cuz my mom called the theater. Man, I was seven and was I ever impressed by a movie. That was the first movie I ever saw at an indoor theater.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 30, 2018 03:14 PM (IqV8l)

281 Touch of Evil is the best Orson Welles movie

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 03:14 PM (PUmDY)

282 Has anyone mentioned that the best musical adaptation of a Shakespeare play, by far, is West Side Story?

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 30, 2018 03:15 PM (V2Yro)

283 No one's mentioned "Spice World" as a rock movie - good or bad (or so bad it's kinda good?!? LOL - - - - I stumbled onto Taymor's "Titus:' one night of insomnia and had no clue about the story. Ho-lee shiiit, that was bananas and trippy.

Posted by: Lizzy[/i] at June 30, 2018 03:15 PM (W+vEI)

284 272 Madison Haven't seen those. I'll check them out. Even Welles' unsuccessful films are at least interesting.

Posted by: strawdog at June 30, 2018 03:15 PM (Cssks)

285 Pug, sounds like you and I have something in common :-)

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:15 PM (eMKNe)

286 Tom Servo: no, you're first to mention it. Spooky fact: Spielberg wants to do a *remake* of West Side Story. Shudders at how much he'll SJW it up...

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:16 PM (eMKNe)

287 277 I guess I'm the kind of guy who would rent 35mm prints if I had the means. Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 08:06 PM (Jj43a) *fistbump* I have an embarrassingly large DVD collection. I am currently running a game of sorts where I watch a movie, then use an actor in that movie to move on to the next. the rule is it has to be a movie I currently possess on DVD or BluRay. I am nearing 300 movies, and have 200 more to go. (again, embarrassingly large collection). Funny thing is I find myself stuck in types, or genres. Right now I am hip deep in Judd Apatow-land. Lots and lots of Jason Segel, Leslie Mann, and Jonah Hill. I shall power through. Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 08:14 PM (EhZNT) ====== I have almost that many Blu-rays. I have double that in DVDs. And I don't think my collection is that big. I remember seeing ebert's once on his show. It was a living room sized closet. I'll get there some day.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:16 PM (Jj43a)

288 For those with long memories, I highlighted it in a thread about a year ago." In fact, your thread is what inspired me to track it down and watch it!

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 30, 2018 03:16 PM (V2Yro)

289 Looked at the pictures, Counts as reading content, right? Posted by: Blake - used scripting salesman at June 30, 2018 07:11 PM (WEBkv) Yes.

Posted by: The Publishers of Children's Books at June 30, 2018 03:17 PM (tA/XW)

290 >>Spooky fact: Spielberg wants to do a *remake* of West Side Story. Shudders at how much he'll SJW it up... Pretty sure I read that it will play up the current immigration politics. Naturally.

Posted by: Lizzy[/i] at June 30, 2018 03:17 PM (W+vEI)

291 Susan Sarandon arrested at an immigration protest. Asking the important questions. Is she still a 1 on the binary scale?

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 03:18 PM (pV/54)

292 276 TJMP -- I have all the physical media. My oldest is brain-injured and I cannot keep her from destroying the physical media, if it's out. The studios are absolutely certain about their rights to keep you from copying anything and have zero interest in replacing any copy that might be damaged for anything less than the full retail price so...I adapt. Personally, my video consumption is almost exclusively limited to "what's in the theater" so my motivation is basically for things to be available for others to view. Otherwise, I too would run 35mm cans out of a clackety-clack projector. Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 08:13 PM (CcUfv) ======= Makes sense. I still just want my actual media. I ripped a bunch of my DVDs because Dolley wanted to put the discs in the attic. I don't think the image looks that great on the hard drive, and the files are all 2+ gbs. Probably how I told the program to encode the files, but that's my personal experience. The image looks a step down from DVDs.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:18 PM (Jj43a)

293 No one's mentioned "Spice World" as a rock movie - good or bad (or so bad it's kinda good?!? LOL Spice World was a very funny movie. It's definitely a good movie.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 03:18 PM (242Sa)

294 TJM, re Tarantino: yep, QT likes to show flicks from his 35mm collection at the LA theater he personally owns, the Beverly Cinema. Also, I read at another website that Quentin Tarantino is shooting his Charles Manson pic, and yes, sadly, it *will* be along the lines of 'alternative history' and/or Inglourious Basterds. He's already getting a lot of groans from the critical community for that.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:18 PM (eMKNe)

295 BREAKING: Kathleen Kennedy to command Shakespeare franchise for Disney. Much Ado About Soy Romeo and Romeo The HERchant of Venice Othello, the Otherized Minority of Venice Hamlette, Princess of Denmark

Posted by: Hands at June 30, 2018 03:19 PM (EzdLW)

296 'Is it gay to like a gladiator flick?' Did a tingle run up your leg? Posted by: Chris Matthews at June 30, 2018 08:14 PM (UdKB7) Yes.

Posted by: Shemp at June 30, 2018 03:19 PM (tA/XW)

297 Thanks, Tom Servo, for the praise of "Chimes at Midnight." I've recorded it before, but for various reasons lost it before viewing. TCM runs it periodically. I'll make a point to finally watch it.

Posted by: Art Rondolet of Malmsey at June 30, 2018 03:19 PM (S+f+m)

298 Susan Sarandon arrested at an immigration protest. Asking the important questions. Is she still a 1 on the binary scale? Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 08:18 PM (pV/54) No.

Posted by: ThePrimordialOrderedPair at June 30, 2018 03:19 PM (242Sa)

299 Ready Player 1 was better than I thought it would be.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (PUmDY)

300 Susan Sarandon arrested at an immigration protest.

Asking the important questions.

Is she still a 1 on the binary scale?
For 70 years old...yeah.

Posted by: tu3031 at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (O5Q3r)

301 Pug, sounds like you and I have something in common :-) Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 08:15 PM (eMKNe) I remember seeing ebert's once on his show. It was a living room sized closet. I'll get there some day. Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 08:16 PM (Jj43a I like having the physical medium. I also have more music CDs than I do movies. I insist on buying CDs. I do rip them to my iTunes library, but I also have the CD. My sons make fun of me. But, whatever.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (EhZNT)

302 Well, I found "The Adams Family" double feature in the $5 discount bin at Walmart. I swear I had it once before but I'm thinking it got borrowed along with "The Patriot". It was painfully hot and humid all day today. Impossible to work outside. I just hope I can get the house to cool down so I can sleep.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse[/i] at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (roQNm)

303 281 Touch of Evil is the best Orson Welles movie Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 08:14 PM (PUmDY) ====== Really, when you throw Touch of Evil, Chimes at Midnight, The Trial, and Citizen Kane up on a wall, I'm just happy that all four exist.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (Jj43a)

304 291 Susan Sarandon arrested at an immigration protest. ---------------------- Shouldn't she be shamed for modeling lesbian cliff car crash suicide? At least in her movie there weren't four kids involved.

Posted by: Puddin Head Teh Chef and Knitter at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (vV/gB)

305 Rusty -- Goldsmith was amazing. I also can't get over Elmer Bernstein, having just seen "Airplane!" What a great score. From the guy who did "10 Commandments" and would go on to do, heh, "Wild, Wild West". Tom Servo -- Seconded on "O! Brother" Puddin Head -- Season 11 (last year's) of MST3K did "Journey". I was 10 when I saw it and was bored out of my skull...

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (CcUfv)

306 Sonny Gray stinks up the joint again.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (LsBY9)

307 TJM: wow, that's a big collection. I've seen the pictures of John Nolte's blu-ray/DVD/VHS collection. It's pretty big too. I can definitely believe Ebert's is huge, but he kind of cheated in that he got a ton of free 'screeners' from the studios to review, even of re-released classics. It's actually next to illegal to ever sell or even share screeners from the studios, they're so paranoid about piracy.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (eMKNe)

308 'Is she still a 1 on the binary scale?' Hell no she is repulsive

Posted by: Chris Matthews at June 30, 2018 03:20 PM (UdKB7)

309 288 For those with long memories, I highlighted it in a thread about a year ago." In fact, your thread is what inspired me to track it down and watch it! Posted by: Tom Servo at June 30, 2018 08:16 PM (V2Yro) ====== Nice. *High fine* Spreading movie love. It's my sole objective. Oh, and buy my books!

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:21 PM (Jj43a)

310 very old joke: first actor: "do you think Hamlet sleeps with Ophelia?" second actor: "Well...he did in Chicago!"

Posted by: strawdog at June 30, 2018 03:21 PM (Cssks)

311 Spooky fact: Spielberg wants to do a *remake* of West Side Story. Shudders at how much he'll SJW it up...


Maybe the Sultry Soviet Senorita can get cameo?

Posted by: tu3031 at June 30, 2018 03:21 PM (O5Q3r)

312 Rosencranz and Guildenstern are Dead is one of my favorite movies. Among other things, I want a house like that.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at June 30, 2018 03:21 PM (87ijN)

313 I found a fingernail in my Drumstick the other day. I think it was a human fingernail, clearly not my own by flavor or texture. Yum. Although I imagine I've eaten a few bushels of rat turds, snot, and insect legs in my 29 plus years of eating processed foods. Don't know if anyone mentioned the Hollow Crown from BBC (Henry IV Part I and II, Henry V) since I don't scroll up, but it's outstanding. Tom Hiddleston is definitely a man crush.

Posted by: Big Fat Meanie at June 30, 2018 03:22 PM (2DbS4)

314 306 Sonny Gray stinks up the joint again. Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at June 30, 2018 08:20 PM (LsBY9) ====== Bet you wish he was still in Oakland, huh?

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:22 PM (Jj43a)

315 Pug: hey, same here with CDs! Agreed about liking having the physical media. Apple can't screw around your music that way. Doesn't hurt that most CD prices keep going down now that it's considered an obsolete medium.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:22 PM (eMKNe)

316 T-storm brewing up in the west, here at stately Peon Manor. Second one today.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at June 30, 2018 03:22 PM (a2xQ5)

317 Lizzy: exactly.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:22 PM (eMKNe)

318 "The Hollow Crown" was really good. Ben Wishaw is a brilliant actor despite being Q. Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 08:13 PM (UwkGr) Very good. Tom Hiddleston is good in it.

Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 03:23 PM (T71PA)

319 I think the lawyer in the Leech Woman is the Incredible Shrinking Man.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 03:24 PM (+Tibp)

320 Bet you wish he was still in Oakland, huh? Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone No, I'm delighted he's with the Yankees.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at June 30, 2018 03:25 PM (LsBY9)

321 319 - Grant Williams, yes, good spot. He seemed to transcend the material, didn't he?

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 03:25 PM (CcUfv)

322 tu3031, oh of course. Maybe Spielberg can get Joe Biden to play Officer Krupke.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:25 PM (eMKNe)

323 Wasn't Sonny Gray in Donnie Brasco? You'd think he'd want to stay in Oakland, wherever that is.

Posted by: Big Fat Meanie at June 30, 2018 03:26 PM (2DbS4)

324 Weather update: Rain is done. Blues skies overhead. God speed Nebraska.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 03:26 PM (EhZNT)

325 tu3031, oh of course. Maybe Spielberg can get Joe Biden to play Officer Krupke. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 08:25 PM (eMKNe) Biden would make a perfect Dogberry.

Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 03:27 PM (T71PA)

326 Pug, yeah I've read that in the midwest, the saying is: "don't like the weather? Wait for 10 minutes"

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:27 PM (eMKNe)

327 There's a lawyer in the leech woman? A leech leech?

Posted by: f'd at June 30, 2018 03:28 PM (UdKB7)

328 My imagination cannot do justice to considering the ways Spielberg might screw up "West Side Story" but here's one. The Jets will now all be Trump supporters. It will be Tony and Andy (rather than Anita) in love

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2018 03:28 PM (AllCR)

329 The newest Ghostbusters movie is at Dollar Tree. I'm not joking.

Posted by: Moron Robbie - I choose to live my life as a black woman at June 30, 2018 03:28 PM (VgKNm)

330 Bah. My lawn, off it. Best score of all time is Erich Korngold's work for the 1938 Adventures of Robin Hood.

Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 03:28 PM (BJdPM)

331 Keanu Reeves makes an appearance in another really good movie . Much Ao About Nothing. What ever you think about his acting, you can't deny he is one of the best script pickers in the business.

Posted by: Lancelot Link Secret Agent Chimp at June 30, 2018 03:29 PM (2DOZq)

332 Fenelon, LOL.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:29 PM (eMKNe)

333 I think it is time for a movie about Bill Cosby's adventures with a Shakespearian setting.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 30, 2018 03:29 PM (EoRCO)

334 Doesn't hurt that most CD prices keep going down now that it's considered an obsolete medium. Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 08:22 PM (eMKNe) I'm just glad I can still find stuff at the little independent music stores in Denver. Best Buy once had a monster collection. Now it's an end-piece near the smart speakers.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 03:29 PM (EhZNT)

335 330 Bah. My lawn, off it. Best score of all time is Erich Korngold's work for the 1938 Adventures of Robin Hood. Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 08:28 PM (BJdPM) ===== Patrick Doyle's work in Henry V is really good.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:29 PM (Jj43a)

336 Pug, same here in SoCal. Best Buy's music and movie selection is a pale shadow of what it once was. Sad.

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:30 PM (eMKNe)

337 It will be Tony and Andy (rather than Anita) in love Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2018 08:28 PM (AllCR) You've been hanging around here too long.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 03:31 PM (EhZNT)

338 I think they can dress it up in new clothes with a little (very little) adaptation to civic norms.

I have always found Will tough to read in the original.

Very convoluted. The audiences had longer attention spans in those days so they got all jokes and plot lines.

Me? not so much.

Still looking for a version of Shakespeare that uses colloquial English without tearing apart all the subtleties.

Posted by: jakee308 at June 30, 2018 03:32 PM (jG5Dt)

339 Speilberg has Tony Kushner adapting the screenplay. Yeah, there will be jabs.

Posted by: Lizzy[/i] at June 30, 2018 03:32 PM (W+vEI)

340 I watched TCM while I was away. It is good I do not have TCM because I'd probably watch it way too much. Saw-among other things- "M" a German murder movie from the 1930's with Peter Lorre. It was great. I didn't know that before that movie was made and before he fled the Nazis and got cast in America as they villain all the time. Lorre had played mainly comic parts. I also saw "Funny Girl" which I had never seen before. It had some comic bits but was too long and I didn't really enjoy Barbara Streisand. I know that I'm "supposed" to, but I just didn't.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2018 03:32 PM (AllCR)

341 Bah. My lawn, off it. Best score of all time is Erich Korngold's work for the 1938 Adventures of Robin Hood. Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 08:28 PM (BJdPM) The Sea Hawk. Korngold was a child prodigy and an incredibly accomplished composer. After his stint in Hollywood he wasn't taken seriously again, as the musical world was taken over by the seriarist totalitarians. His Violin Concerto - derided as "more Corn than Gold" - is a masterpiece, widely recorded.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at June 30, 2018 03:33 PM (LsBY9)

342 You'd think he'd want to stay in Oakland, wherever that is. Posted by: Big Fat Meanie at June 30, 2018 08:26 PM (2DbS4) Have you ever been to Oakland?

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2018 03:33 PM (hq7zy)

343 338 I think they can dress it up in new clothes with a little (very little) adaptation to civic norms. I have always found Will tough to read in the original. Very convoluted. The audiences had longer attention spans in those days so they got all jokes and plot lines. Me? not so much. Still looking for a version of Shakespeare that uses colloquial English without tearing apart all the subtleties. Posted by: jakee308 at June 30, 2018 08:32 PM (jG5Dt) ====== Shakespearean dialogue requires attention, but once you give it I find it to be very easy to understand, even borderline natural sounding. It's about getting into the groove. You can't go in and out.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:33 PM (Jj43a)

344 The newest Ghostbusters movie is at Dollar Tree. I'm not jok... Oh. Nevermind

Posted by: Amy Schumer at June 30, 2018 03:35 PM (hq7zy)

345 Personally, my video consumption is almost exclusively limited to "what's in the theater" Interesting - my video consumption is almost exclusively limited to what was in the theater between 25 and 80 years ago.

Posted by: Tom Servo at June 30, 2018 03:35 PM (V2Yro)

346 Why do we have to have a new version of "West Side Story" anyway"? Aside from the fact that-I think- Tony and Anita's voices were both dubbed it was a fine film.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2018 03:35 PM (AllCR)

347 Shakespearean dialogue requires attention, but once you give it I find it to be very easy to understand, even borderline natural sounding. It's about getting into the groove. You can't go in and out. Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 08:33 PM (Jj43a) Much like jive, yo.

Posted by: Beaver's Mom at June 30, 2018 03:36 PM (hq7zy)

348 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Herrmann

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 30, 2018 03:36 PM (IqV8l)

349 De lurking... Has anyone mentioned the classic... Moonlighting Atomic Shakespeare ...back to lurking

Posted by: popcorn at June 30, 2018 03:37 PM (pE1qT)

350 I will grant you that The Sea Hawk score is also excellent. I've sought out Korngold's non-Hollywood work and been impressed. He also adapted the Robin Hood score into a suite; I've heard it on the classical stations once or twice but been unable to find it for purchase.

Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 03:37 PM (BJdPM)

351 Pretty sure I read that it will play up the current immigration politics. Naturally. Posted by: Lizzy at June 30, 2018 08:17 PM (W+vEI) The local TV stations running stories on the protests for illegals today were nothing but propaganda pieces for the lefty turds.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 03:38 PM (SiINZ)

352 Still looking for a version of Shakespeare that uses colloquial English without tearing apart all the subtleties. Posted by: jakee308 at June 30, 2018 08:32 PM (jG5Dt) ====== Shakespearean dialogue requires attention, but once you give it I find it to be very easy to understand, even borderline natural sounding. It's about getting into the groove. You can't go in and out. Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 08:33 PM (Jj43a) ^This. I don't think it is possible to modernize the English and keep the subtleties.

Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 03:38 PM (T71PA)

353 Why do we have to have a new version of "West Side Story" anyway"? Aside from the fact that-I think- Tony and Anita's voices were both dubbed it was a fine film. Posted by: FenelonSpoke at June 30, 2018 08:35 PM (AllCR) No heroic trannie subplot in the old one.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2018 03:39 PM (hq7zy)

354 I often wonder how much of Shakespeare's plays the "Groundlings" and the common/poor people understood. Did they go because they had nothing better to do, or did they actually appreciate his word play? And was Shakespeare actually the Jethro Tull looking guy with the earring that we are shown in paintings and woodcuts, or was he someone like Edward de Vere? Speaking of Kenneth Branagh: I felt his Henry the Fifth was a much better movie than his production of Hamlet. It seemed to suit his character more.

Posted by: Anonymous White Male at June 30, 2018 03:39 PM (9BLnV)

355 I also have to say that Michael Giacchino's work on the Incredibles and Incredibles2 is the best James Bond soundtrack I've ever heard.

Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 03:40 PM (BJdPM)

356 The local TV stations running stories on the protests for illegals today were nothing but propaganda pieces for the lefty turds. Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 08:38 PM Most news "stories" are just that.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 30, 2018 03:40 PM (IqV8l)

357 Agreed as far as "getting into the groove" of Shakespeare language. Took me about 20 minutes for Whedon's "Much ado" (noted in my review) but a good hour for the recent Scottish-brogue heavy "MacBeth" which actually doesn't have much dialogue at all in it! =P

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 03:40 PM (CcUfv)

358 Baz Lurhmann is the cinematic equivalent of cancer.

Posted by: Bear with Assymetrical Balls at June 30, 2018 03:40 PM (H5knJ)

359 Just learned at Quora that Gavin McLeod is "deep into Christianity."

Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 03:40 PM (eMKNe)

360 Shakespearean dialogue requires attention, but once you give it I find it to be very easy to understand, even borderline natural sounding. It's about getting into the groove. You can't go in and out. Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 08:33 PM (Jj43a) Hearing Shakespeare is far more fulfilling than trying to read his stuff. When I do read his words I read them aloud. Just works better.

Posted by: Pug Mahon, Gentleman Drunkard at June 30, 2018 03:41 PM (EhZNT)

361 keanu was great in Dangerous Liasons.

Posted by: vivi at June 30, 2018 03:41 PM (11H2y)

362 "178 I just saw Roadie, which must have been Meat Loaf's first movie. It was pretty good. Kind of hokey but I liked it."
He was in Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at June 30, 2018 03:41 PM (l9m7l)

363 Just learned at Quora that Gavin McLeod is "deep into Christianity." Posted by: qdpsteve at June 30, 2018 08:40 PM (eMKNe) He needs to convince Isaac to stop selling alcohol.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at June 30, 2018 03:41 PM (hq7zy)

364 Last Waltz is stupendous

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 03:41 PM (PUmDY)

365 Tom Servo -- Actually, me, too. Seriously, more than half of my recent watches are classics. Probably half of what remain are Asian or foreign. Can't hardly find anything new (in English) worth watching.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 03:42 PM (CcUfv)

366 358 Baz Lurhmann is the cinematic equivalent of cancer. Posted by: Bear with Assymetrical Balls at June 30, 2018 08:40 PM (H5knJ) ===== I like him. Strictly Ballroom is weird. I genuinely love Moulin Rouge. I wish he had made his movie about Alexander. Could have been interesting.

Posted by: TheJamesMadison's Phone at June 30, 2018 03:42 PM (Jj43a)

367 I often wonder how much of Shakespeare's plays the "Groundlings" and the common/poor people understood. Did they go because they had nothing better to do, or did they actually appreciate his word play? ... Posted by: Anonymous White Male at June 30, 2018 08:39 PM (9BLnV) The common people were his audience. His plays are bawdy and violent. They loved it.

Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 03:42 PM (T71PA)

368 Greetings:

Back in the last '69, I was taking a malaria vacation at a hospital at Cam Ran Bay as part of my all-expense-paid tour of somewhat sunny Southeast Asia. The hospital had an outdoor amphitheater where movies would be shown after dark.  Some knucklehead thought Franc Zefferelli's "Romeo and Juliet" would like totally meet the needs of the assembled young soldiers and whatevers.

As the cherry on top of this evening's entertainment, my army division and the Marines weren't exactly getting along organizationally and cans of beer were allowed with like totally predictable results.

Posted by: 11B40 at June 30, 2018 03:42 PM (evgyj)

369 Korngold scores are fantastic! Korngold combined with a sudden influx of talented Europeans on the run from the Nazis made for some amazing film scores from about 1944 onward.

Posted by: backbeatbaby at June 30, 2018 03:42 PM (w7KSn)

370 He also adapted the Robin Hood score into a suite; I've heard it on the classical stations once or twice but been unable to find it for purchase. Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 08:37 PM (BJdPM) https://tinyurl.com/y99pbtam https://tinyurl.com/ya94xhzp

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at June 30, 2018 03:43 PM (LsBY9)

371 358 Bear with Assymetrical Balls I found his Strictly Ballroom to be a great life-affirming story and quite a romantic movie. Have not seen any others of his movies.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 30, 2018 03:43 PM (hyuyC)

372 Bernard Hermann was one of the greats.  Danny Elfman sure must think so, since every one of his scores is a Hermann rip-off in one way or another.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 03:44 PM (SN4NF)

373 The Wall or Quadrophenia Tommy Kids are Alright Rust Never Sleeps

Posted by: MAxIE, mentioned in dispatches at June 30, 2018 03:45 PM (9TR2V)

374 Zachariah (1971) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068011 Gunfights and electric guitars in the Old West? You bet! Zachariah gets a mail order gun, practices a little, and kills a man in the local saloon. He and his friend Matthew set out to become gunfighters, joining with the Crackers, a rock band who are also (pitifully inept) stage robbers. Having quickly outgrown that gang, Zachariah and Matthew set out to become bigtime gunslingers. Before long, they part company and a rivalry grows between them. Has The James Gang, Country Joe and the Fish, Doug Kershaw and Don Johnson.

Posted by: Bertram Cabot, Jr. at June 30, 2018 03:46 PM (IqV8l)

375 My wife also likes Strictly Ballroom. I've not seen it, but based on her description it sounds like Lurhmann's one normal film.

Posted by: Bear with Assymetrical Balls at June 30, 2018 03:47 PM (H5knJ)

376 Hadrian, much obliged but I already have the Robin Hood full soundtrack. It was one of my first purchases from iTunes, lo these many years ago.

Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 03:49 PM (BJdPM)

377 Bear with Assymetrical Balls I would not say normal about that movie, but it captures small-group dynamics, small towns and dreams pretty well. With a great finale. What dancing!

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 30, 2018 03:50 PM (hyuyC)

378 You've not experienced Shakespeare until you have read him in the original Klingon.

Posted by: Chancellor Gorkon at June 30, 2018 03:51 PM (DMUuz)

379 The Leech Woman is a little culturally insensitive.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 03:51 PM (+Tibp)

380 Posted by: Darles Chickens at June 30, 2018 08:49 PM (BJdPM) OK, good. Just trying to be helpful for once in my wretched life.

Posted by: Hadrian the Seventh at June 30, 2018 03:52 PM (LsBY9)

381 Bear with Assymetrical Balls See Strictly Ballroom together when the kids are at the grandparents.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 30, 2018 03:53 PM (hyuyC)

382 There's a "loudness" or "flashiness" about his films that rubs me wrong; his work produces a very negative, visceral reaction for me.

Posted by: Bear with Assymetrical Balls at June 30, 2018 03:53 PM (H5knJ)

383 Warriors was great. In the City, particularly.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 03:53 PM (PUmDY)

384 i guess i'd have to say zefferelli's romeo and juliet. just beautiful and engaging. and olivia hussey is just transcendently beautiful as juliet. i know, she's no bababoom bababoom bababoom, unlike rose ellen lunsky who i had an unrequited thing for. and then, at wendy pfeiffer's party, the first party with slow dancing i was invited to, i was sitting on a piano bench and rose ellen plunked herself down on my lap, put her arms around me and gave me a kiss! wow! but then she just got up and left and i turned around and there she was with her friends laughing at me!. heartbroken i wandered outside and stared up at the starry night sky - how could there be such cruelty in the universe? but somehow, i got over it.

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at June 30, 2018 03:54 PM (Pg+x7)

385 People are starting to over-share, here.

Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 03:55 PM (SN4NF)

386 I have rewatched "Dickensian" at least three times now.

Posted by: Ben Had at June 30, 2018 03:57 PM (UwkGr)

387 Car Wash had a pretty good soundtrack.

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 03:57 PM (PUmDY)

388 i guess i'd have to say zefferelli's romeo and juliet. just beautiful and engaging. Posted by: musical jolly chimp I see what you mean. I saw it recently and finally got the "I am a grave man" reference. Also, Michael York was punchable as Tybalt.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 03:58 PM (+Tibp)

389 Guilty pleasure: "10 Things I Hate About You" It's a charming take on "The Taming of the Shrew".

Posted by: UDM at June 30, 2018 03:59 PM (cuC7S)

390 385 People are starting to over-share, here. Posted by: Rusty Nail at June 30, 2018 08:55 PM (SN4NF) I have sweaty balls today.

Posted by: Oversharer at June 30, 2018 03:59 PM (2CQCl)

391 The Leech Woman's Old Malla looks like Maxine Whatshername.

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 30, 2018 04:02 PM (EoRCO)

392 The Leech Woman's Old Malla looks like Maxine Whatshername. Posted by: Hairyback Guy But far more dignified.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 04:02 PM (+Tibp)

393 Saw Midnight Express many times but not in 20 years, made me never want to go to Turkey, well that and Lawrence of Arabia.

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 04:02 PM (pHfeF)

394 Was watching the Leech Woman but got tired of seeing clips of Mutual of Omaha' s Wild Kingdom

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 04:04 PM (pHfeF)

395 Best Shakespeare I ever saw was Hamlet the musical on Gilligan's Island.

Just thought I'd share that.

Posted by: Fritz at June 30, 2018 04:06 PM (J7XgW)

396 I love movies and love making them even more! My personal favorite was "Big Sausage Pizza - Double Congressional Delivery" I played myself, naturally. And don't believe the lies about the casting couch - its actually a table, beanbag chair, or maybe a futon. Whatever's nearby actually.

Posted by: Ali Watkins - bent over a table at June 30, 2018 04:07 PM (PTA8E)

397 Take that back, very great... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3v8I5egzoMo&app=desktop

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 04:08 PM (PUmDY)

398 I really prefer Branagh's version of Hamlet for a variety of reasons. One of the main reasons is because it didn't come across as "Shakespeare" because it wasn't overacted like how Shakespeare adaptations almost always are. Putting the setting in the 18th Century helped with this. Of course, my favorite example of doing this and getting away with it is "Richard III" set in a fascist 1930's Britain (the King even has an American Queen...). One of the main reasons is that they used top-bill actors in even the minor roles. The stand-out example is when Charlton Heston's character does nothing but recite verse while Judi Dench and John Gielgud's characters acted (almost) silently. Honestly, they did so much with so little to give one of the most powerful and moving scene in any movie I've seen.

Posted by: The Danish Hat at June 30, 2018 04:09 PM (itfg0)

399 Lara Trump is hot.

Posted by: logprof at June 30, 2018 04:09 PM (e7oj4)

400 The scene in Branagh's "Hamlet" with Heston, Dench, and Gielgud. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ta9_16_um1k

Posted by: The Danish Hat at June 30, 2018 04:09 PM (itfg0)

401 Most of what I know of Hamlet I learned from Gilligan's Island And opera from Bugs Bunny

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 04:10 PM (pHfeF)

402 "Midnight Express" should have been called "Deliverance II: Turkey Time".

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at June 30, 2018 04:11 PM (EoRCO)

403 >> Best Shakespeare I ever saw was Hamlet the musical on Gilligan's Island. I remember that well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKMOClN9ITg Phil Silvers was guest starring in that, as famed producer Harold Hecuba.

Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at June 30, 2018 04:11 PM (8O3HH)

404 A local channel is showing Seven Brides For Seven Brothers followed by The Thin Man. I always enjoy Seven Brides except for the scenes with Jane Powell. She never did much for me although I like the movies she's in. When I first saw Seven Brides as a kid I thought Howard Keel had such a deep voice. Now I know he was an F'ing baritone. When I sing along (yeah, I'm one of those people) I have to drop down an octave. The Thin Man is one of the great fun movies of all time.

Posted by: JTB at June 30, 2018 04:12 PM (V+03K)

405 361 keanu was great in Dangerous Liasons. Posted by: vivi at June 30, 2018 08:41 PM (11H2y) I was surprised by that. He really is a good script picker. But Valmont is a better rendition, particularly because Meg Tilly is heartbreakingly beautiful in that one.

Posted by: joncelli, delivering his speech at June 30, 2018 04:12 PM (1FhAQ)

406 I watched Harper on TCM this afternoon. I have never seen it. Great cast and Newman was perfect. Good Lord than man was gorgeous.

Posted by: Jewells45 at June 30, 2018 04:13 PM (dUJdY)

407 Hanlan Ellison has died https://youtu.be/75n4px-A-zY A legend in science fiction.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at June 30, 2018 04:16 PM (rnAwa)

408 The Rabbit of Seville: https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2o5y7d

Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at June 30, 2018 04:16 PM (8O3HH)

409 The Thin Man is one of the great fun movies of all time. Posted by: JTB at June 30, 2018 09:12 PM (V+03K) It really is. William Powell was just perfect in it

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 04:18 PM (SiINZ)

410 Annette Benning is deliciously wicked in Valmont.

Posted by: davidt at June 30, 2018 04:20 PM (oj0PH)

411 393 Saw Midnight Express many times but not in 20 years, made me never want to go to Turkey, well that and Lawrence of Arabia. Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 09:02 PM (pHfeF) Worked several years in NW KSA. Made the trip up near the Jordanian border to see the wreck of the train Lawrence blew up.

Posted by: Iron Mike Golf at June 30, 2018 04:20 PM (di1hb)

412 Phil Silvers was guest starring in that, as famed producer Harold Hecuba. Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear I watched A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum this week on TCM. Phil Silvers was great in it, but I can't imagine why he was cast. I only ever knew him from American TV and always playing the same unctuous character. It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, not withstanding.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 04:21 PM (+Tibp)

413 Phil Silvers was pretty flamboyant

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 04:21 PM (PUmDY)

414 If you like William Powell, track down "The Senator Was Indiscreet." Terrific political comedy. "Hello, Theodore? This is You Know Who."

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 30, 2018 04:21 PM (a4DII)

415 Spooky fact: Spielberg wants to do a *remake* of West Side Story. Shudders at how much he'll SJW it up... Posted by: qdpsteve At the end, Maria runs for Congress.

Posted by: Bozo Conservative....outlaw in America at June 30, 2018 04:21 PM (S6Pax)

416 To answer TJM's question, I think there is a case to be made that film is inherently a different medium than books, so adaptations of books can deviate from the text. I don't think that case is as strong when we are talking about a play. But I will say that whichever the director is doing - faithful or their own take - they need to commit to that and execute. If you're going to be faithful, BE FAITHFUL.

Posted by: Mrs. Peel at June 30, 2018 04:21 PM (H78XB)

417 Wrote a paper in college back in the day that contrasted two different versions of "Hamlet" -- Branagh's verson and a BBC production (both had Jacoby, abet in different roles). I considered that Branagh's version was "action without thought" while the BBC version was "though without action". Interesting how the same play could be interpreted in such contrasting ways.

Posted by: The Being Hat at June 30, 2018 04:22 PM (itfg0)

418 Annette Benning is deliciously wicked in Valmont. Posted by: davidt at June 30, 2018 09:20 PM (oj0PH) ------- The first movie I saw her in was Grifters. Yowza!

Posted by: Calm Mentor at June 30, 2018 04:22 PM (I16G8)

419 411 on TMP someone recently posted pictures of it, neat to see that and was amazed it wasn't scrapped.

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 04:23 PM (pHfeF)

420 Korngold's score for Kings Row was one of his best and inspired John Williams score for the first Star Wars. Anvil of Crom was another great movie score and honorable mention for the score of The Magnificent Seven.

Posted by: Larsen E. Whipsnade at June 30, 2018 04:24 PM (bML9A)

421 You have not experienced Shakespeare until you have read him in the original Klingon.

Posted by: Chancellor Gorkon at June 30, 2018 04:24 PM (itfg0)

422 Hanlan Ellison has died https://youtu.be/75n4px-A-zY A legend in science fiction. Posted by: BourbonChicken at June 30, 2018 09:16 PM (rnAwa) I was just reading about that on the Me TV site

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 04:24 PM (SiINZ)

423 hey TJM, I checked amazon this morning, they have 3 of your books going live tomorrow?

Posted by: votermom pimping NEW Moron-authored books! at June 30, 2018 04:25 PM (hMwEB)

424 Here is Brian Blessed in Hamlet https://youtu.be/IBQucj2hea4 Not shouting for once.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at June 30, 2018 04:25 PM (rnAwa)

425 Elizabeth Warren is the newest to grab hold of Abolish ICE as a platform. Keep that going, pretty please with sugar on top

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 04:25 PM (pHfeF)

426 A local channel is showing Seven Brides For Seven Brothers followed by The Thin Man. I always enjoy Seven Brides except for the scenes with Jane Powell. She never did much for me although I like the movies she's in.

--

Seven Brides was on TCM last week.  Julie Numar is beautiful in it. 

Posted by: Lady in Black - Death to the Man Bun at June 30, 2018 04:26 PM (mQ0Mc)

427 taH pagh taHbe'

Posted by: General Chang at June 30, 2018 04:26 PM (itfg0)

428 The Thin Man is one of the great fun movies of all time. Posted by: JTB at June 30, 2018 09:12 PM (V+03K) It really is. William Powell was just perfect in it Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 09:18 PM (SiINZ) ======== I love that movie. Powell had panache. Like Tom Baker or Sean Connery, you felt like a co-conspirator, in on the fun. I hope the SJWs don't try to remake it.

Posted by: Steve and Cold Bear at June 30, 2018 04:26 PM (/qEW2)

429 >> I only ever knew him from American TV and always playing the same unctuous character Yep, Phil Silvers played Phil Silvers most of the time, a slick talking, money grubbing con man. He played "Honest John" on the Beverly Hillbillies, who sold Uncle Jed the Brooklyn Bridge (or something like that).

Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at June 30, 2018 04:27 PM (8O3HH)

430 ... and myrna loy, the great ethereal beauty. my fav actress of the golden age of the silver screen, in addition to the thin man she was in one of my favorite comedies, "mr. landings builds his dream house" - one of the champs. she could do it all!

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at June 30, 2018 04:27 PM (Pg+x7)

431 Mmmmmmmmmm, Pam Bondi

Posted by: logprof at June 30, 2018 04:29 PM (e7oj4)

432 ... i love the scene where she's describing the colors she wants for the rooms to the house painters who nod at every nuanced detail - and when she leaves, one says to the other "got that, mack? red, yellow blue."

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at June 30, 2018 04:29 PM (Pg+x7)

433 I need to turn out the light before the ONT comes up. Good night all, and if your up at 4am stop on in.

Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 04:30 PM (pHfeF)

434 Watching a Baz Luhrmann movie is like having ADHD. It is unbearable. However the movie Australia is decent melodrama. It is probably the only good movie he will ever make.

Posted by: BourbonChicken at June 30, 2018 04:30 PM (rnAwa)

435 ..." if it ain't wham, it ain't ham!"

Posted by: musical jolly chimp at June 30, 2018 04:30 PM (Pg+x7)

436 They're doing a Cary Grant double-feature at the local bijoi. They announced this and said "Charade..." [everyone claps] I'm sitting there goin' "MrBlandingsMrBlandingsMrBlandingsMrBlandingsMrBlandings" "...and Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House." "YES! ...oh, sorry..."

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 04:31 PM (CcUfv)

437 Elizabeth Warren is the newest to grab hold of Abolish ICE as a platform. Keep that going, pretty please with sugar on top Posted by: Skip at June 30, 2018 09:25 PM (pHfeF) ----------- I happen to agree, as it reflects badly on Libtards everywhere. However, like Mad Maxscene, Nanzi, Shiela Jackson Lee and all the others, they are playing to their base to keep themselves in office. As they are in batshit cray cray Leftard areas, this assures they will keep their jobs.

Posted by: Calm Mentor at June 30, 2018 04:31 PM (I16G8)

438 Saw "The Thin Man" very close on hand to "Mr Blandings" the first time...14 years difference and Myrna Loy is just as radiant.

Posted by: moviegique at June 30, 2018 04:32 PM (CcUfv)

439 I enjoyed the modern setting of Romeo and Juliette that had Brian Dennehy in it.

Posted by: Grump928(C) at June 30, 2018 04:33 PM (yQpMk)

440 Shakespeare in Love was the only movie that I went back to, and watched in the theater, several times -- the last time with my daughter, upon her graduating from USMC basic at Parris Island. I loved that version, mostly because as an English major, I got all the sly references! Also loved the Branaugh Henry V, and Much Ado About Nothing. When in high school, my daughter took my old VHS copy of the Zeffirelli Romeo and Juliet to her English class, where the girls were permitted to watch it - and of course, most of the girls in class fell instantly in love with Leonard Whiting, and were crushed to be informed afterwards that it was a very old movie, and that Leonard Whiting was about the age of their father, or perhaps grandfather. The thing about Shakespeare, is that you have to see it performed. Just reading it, the dry words on the page ... it doesn't work. One has to see it performed, in a movie or live, for it to really live. One of my cherished experiences as a publisher, though - was to publish a play by a local literary light; John Igo, who taught English for many years at one of our universities in San Antonio. (He was so distinguished that he had a library branch named after him, and he was a dear friend of the founder of Watercress Press.) He had done - sometime in the late 1960s, a re-working of Hamlet, where Claudius was the tragic hero, and Hamlet was a sullen, spoiled emo youth. It was a magnificent re-working, and was performed by a local company to fantastic effect. The language was perfect, the characterizations on-point, and the production so awesome that Professor Igo was kind of put off doing drama for some time, feeling that his subsequent works could not equal it. http://watercresspress.com/?page_id=96

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at June 30, 2018 04:34 PM (xnmPy)

441 However the movie Australia is decent melodrama. Is that the one with Nicole Kidman?

Posted by: Grump928(C) at June 30, 2018 04:34 PM (yQpMk)

442 "Seven Brides was on TCM last week. Julie Numar is beautiful in it." Yep. She has an improbable Jessica Rabbit body. Can you say Hourglass.

Posted by: Ignoramus at June 30, 2018 04:35 PM (pV/54)

443 Ah, Phil Silvers. He had only one role, but he played it for all it was worth. When he appears in "Mad ... World," the film immediately peeks up.

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 30, 2018 04:35 PM (a4DII)

444 439 ... "I enjoyed the modern setting of Romeo and Juliette that had Brian Dennehy in it." Did Dennehy play Verona?

Posted by: JTB at June 30, 2018 04:36 PM (V+03K)

445 Pam Bondi, Judge Jugs, and Michelle Malkin . . . off to rub one out.

Posted by: logprof at June 30, 2018 04:38 PM (e7oj4)

446 Did Dennehy play Verona? Fairly well.

Posted by: Grump928(C) at June 30, 2018 04:39 PM (yQpMk)

447 The common people were his audience. His plays are bawdy and violent. They loved it. Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 08:42 PM (T71PA) Oh, so you're that 17th century journalist that interviewed them! Dr. WTF? That doesn't sound very Elizabethan. Some of his plays were bawdy. Some were violent. Some had elements of bawdy and violent. All his plays did not. And again, did they have any understanding of the meaning of his word smithing or did they just come for the fencing and double entendres?

Posted by: Anonymous White Male at June 30, 2018 04:39 PM (9BLnV)

448 Myrna Loy? See "The Bachelor and the Bobbysoxer." I doubt than teens were ever like that, but it's another fun flick. Ray Collins for garnish.

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 30, 2018 04:41 PM (a4DII)

449 Pam Bondi, Judge Jugs, and Michelle Malkin . . . Posted by: logprof I'll be in my bunk.

Posted by: Blutarski at June 30, 2018 04:41 PM (+Tibp)

450 Adding my vote to the "Hamlet" with Mel Gibson over Branagh's.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at June 30, 2018 04:42 PM (THS4q)

451 Here is Brian Blessed in Hamlet https://youtu.be/IBQucj2hea4 Not shouting for once. Yah, he has a pretty powerful sonic attack when he wants.

Posted by: Thing From Snowy Mountain at June 30, 2018 04:43 PM (87ijN)

452 The Bard was a Moron. His dirty jokes and double entendres (and sometimes triple entendres) were some of the best. The language has changed enough that the dirty jokes go right over most people's heads today. High school students being forced to read it just don't know what is going right past them. For example, "Hoist by his own petard" is a fart joke.

Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at June 30, 2018 04:43 PM (8O3HH)

453 LMAO, Judge Jeanine just pantsed that asshat Chris Hahn.

Posted by: logprof at June 30, 2018 04:43 PM (e7oj4)

454 An old B&W movie I love. Five Graves To Cairo with Franchot Tone.

Posted by: mpfs, Super Elite at June 30, 2018 04:43 PM (wL0Xf)

455 NOOD. ONT

Posted by: DR.WTF? at June 30, 2018 04:43 PM (T71PA)

456 See "The Bachelor and the Bobbysoxer." I doubt than teens were ever like that, but it's another fun flick. Ray Collins for garnish. Posted by: Weak Geek at June 30, 2018 09:41 PM (a4DII) Fun movie. Cary Grant was very good in comedies.

Posted by: TheQuietMan at June 30, 2018 04:44 PM (SiINZ)

457 Nood Weird Dave ONT. A good one. With a guy going for boobs.

Posted by: NaCly Dog at June 30, 2018 04:45 PM (hyuyC)

458 give me the night,,, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_JgRtv50fs&app=desktop

Posted by: Cosmic Charlie at June 30, 2018 04:45 PM (PUmDY)

459 I saw a high school production of "Hamlet" a few years ago. Original dialogue, modern sets -- offices instead of castle chambers, and the like. It really worked.

Posted by: Weak Geek at June 30, 2018 04:46 PM (a4DII)

460 And if you haven't seen "Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)", it's on Youtube.  I still snicker at Titus Andronicus as a cooking show.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at June 30, 2018 04:48 PM (THS4q)

461 Humans aren't the only primates that dig homo sapie boobies: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3687670 You can find many more monkey grabbing boobies videos.

Posted by: publius, Rascally Rapscallion of a Poperin Pear at June 30, 2018 04:50 PM (8O3HH)

462 TL;DR all but I would disagree that The Words don't work on paper, with a caveat: I think they do if you have heard them or seen them before and go to read them later. If you can hear the rhythms and pacing in your head you can create some stirring words in your head almost as beautiful as seeing them. Or perhaps I'm just lucky that the voices in my head all love Shakespeare... An entire thread someday on Midsummers Nights Dream film versions would be lovely. I think I have all the common ones. Each is amazing and most are Originalist Shakespeare rather than Living Breathing Shakespeare. I love artistic intrepretation - to a point. Seeing Much Ado About Nothing performed entirely on trapeze swings in raincoats - as I did once - REALLY detracts from the material! And let us not forget the hilarious The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) ...

Posted by: In Vino Veritits at June 30, 2018 04:50 PM (UFLLM)

463 All of Shakespeare's plays in five minutes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3dQFR8oWb4

Posted by: The Infinite Hat at June 30, 2018 04:51 PM (itfg0)

464 I don't see any comments on Joseph Mankiewicz's 1953 "Julius Caesar," in which Marlon Brando made such a breathtaking Antony. His "dogs of war" prophecy over Caesar's corpse is one of the high points in Shakespearean cinema. See what I mean at: https://youtu.be/tY1ezMyRV9w

Posted by: William Befort at June 30, 2018 06:18 PM (hJFOo)

465
When my girls were about ten and twelve I brought home a video of Branagh's "Much Ado About Nothing".  They loved it, and it was their first exposure being 16th century English and to William Shakespeare. 

Subsequently, Shakespeare was perceived by them as approachable and engaging, a perspective that few Millennials share. 

Posted by: Levin at June 30, 2018 06:30 PM (kk8TL)

466 Speaking of Julie Newmar, I can't say I cared much for "Lil Abner" but the Morons would like seeing her as Stupefyin' Jones.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at June 30, 2018 06:56 PM (THS4q)

467 'Guardians of the Galaxy' Director Blames Trump, Sans Proof, for Newspaper Massacre https://bit.ly/2Kyu4Pf

Posted by: Trigger Warning at June 30, 2018 07:19 PM (YRXy3)

468 Shakespeare in Love was my first exposure to Geoffrey Bean. I just love his character. And his Captain Barbosa is a thing of beauty. Put a scruffy beard and hair on him, and he just takes over the whole thing. I don't know who was more fun in the first Pirates of the Caribbean -- Johnny Depp or Geofrey Bean.

Posted by: Deplorable Lady with Only Two Deplorable Cats at June 30, 2018 07:32 PM (ZDagw)

469 "Scotland, PA", with the lovely and charming Maura Tierney, was an amusing re-telling of "Macbeth". If memory serves, it's the story without the precise dialogue, set in modern-ish times. The plot revolves around a fast food restaurant, and it's played for laughs. But it works. The genre of modern timeframe but with precise dialogue, like the not too old "Coriolanius" doesn't work. A moderni retelling of "Coriolanius" could work very well, but the dialogue should be used a a starting point, a reference. Otherwise, stick to the original.

Posted by: occam's brassiere at June 30, 2018 09:08 PM (lu06V)

470 Over the years, I have read and reread and never really though of Fortinbras, other than the sheer exhaustion of the ending leaving everyone dead. But, yours in an interesting take of a revenge so complete that Denmark as an independent state is yet another death. I do remember the immediate run up to the crowning of Fortinbras in Brannagh's version of Hamlet. The utter distraction in the Danish court with the deaths of Cluadius, Hamlet, Laertes and Gertrude. The scene was stark with Fortinbras' soldiers running through was seems an empty and neglected palace to take possession, symbolically, of Denmark. But then, all of Shakespeare's tragedies end in destruction not of the main protagonists but of many innocents caught in the wrong place at the wrong time. Shakespearian unintended consequences?

Posted by: Eugene Podrazik at July 01, 2018 03:37 AM (reKAM)

471 468, think you mean Geoffrey Rush.

Posted by: roamingfirehydrant at July 01, 2018 04:12 AM (THS4q)

472 The new Sicario opens with a shocking scene ... shocking by Hollywood standards. We see an Islamic terrorist enter the country through the U.S. Mexico border. Now that's subversive storytelling in 2018!

Posted by: Christian Toto at July 01, 2018 06:58 AM (GppXG)

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