March 01, 2014

Yard and Garden Thread: Make Your Bed Edition [Y-not and WeirdDave]
— Open Blogger

Good afternoon, morons & moronettes. Welcome to your Saturday Gardening Thread!

This thread brought to you by ”Thanks for the snack!”:

MooseGarden.jpg

By the way, this guy was no help at all!

YellowLabGarden.jpg

Everything you (n)ever wanted to know about raised beds below the jump.
From your host, WeirdDave:

Well, I’ve been sick for most of the week, and I’m behind on lots of stuff and I have to be up early Saturday morning, so this one’s going to be quick and dirty. Since the subject is raised beds, I have one on topic story.

Gingy and I met online. We both frequented a message board that I decline to name that was fun and interesting and also unfortunately infested with some of the most brain dead progs you’ll find on the internet. Lots of cool, fun people, but when politics came up the idiots and assholes appeared. She avoided the political stuff (which you could do, it had different forums) and I spent too much time trying to teach pigs to sing. (Funny story-I got banned from there after another poster held forth for the nth time about the warmongering Israelis and the innocent peaceful Muslims they victimized. I said “OK, asshole, here’s the deal. Lets you and I fly to Jerusalem-my treat. I’ll pick up the tab, flights, room, board, all expenses paid. All you have to do is walk around the West Bank for an hour wearing a sandwich board that says in Arabic “Allah loves the IDF”. Hell, I’ll even wear a “G-d loves the PLO” board and march in front of IDF HQ for a whole day. How about it?” For some strange reason he demurred. I kept hounding him about it, challenging him to take his free vacation, and I got banned for “Wishing death on another poster”, which, if you’re not too blinded by ideology to see (they were), kinda proved my point.). Anyhow, 10 years ago, I made a post about raised beds which I’ll copy here:

“These past couple of weeks, my wife has been complaining of dizziness because of her pregnancy. It was happening in the morning when she got out of bed, in the evenings after lying there watching TV, it was making her really uncomfortable. She said the only solution was for her to get high, and she wanted my help. Reluctantly, I agreed. I checked with some of the major dealers, but they wanted too much money, hell, the Swedish dealer wanted over $200! Luckily, I knew a place, down in the warehouse district off Grundy St. where I could get what she wanted for a lot less. This evening I went down there and scored just what the doctor ordered for only a little more than $50! I was pretty jazzed to have saved that much money. I came directly home, I'm pretty sure that nobody I know saw me. Getting it into the house was tricky, we had to make sure our young son Matthew was out of the way, but we successfully got it into the bedroom and closed the door. Now my wife is lying in there, nice and high with a smile on her face. I'm a good husband. ;-) ( Although when I finish up here, I'm going into the bedroom and you better believe that I'll be high too.) “

I titled it “Helping my wife get high”. Most people got it, but a couple didn’t and they got offended that I would give drugs to my pregnant wife (I never mentioned drugs. I didn’t actually mention raised beds either, but that’s what it was about. I got an extra box spring, it was easier for Gingy to lever her pregnant self on and off a high bed rather than a low one). “What about the baby?!??” they squealed! “Drugs could harm him!” (I didn’t think about it until later as at the time I was just in my final lap of converting from pro-abortion to pro-life, but if I had posted “We’ve decided to kill our unborn child” nobody there would have said boo.) A particularly humorless moderator closed the thread fairly quickly, but there you have it: My one and only experience with raised beds.


And now from your co-hostess, Y-not:

“Farm Report” from Zone 7a in Utah

We had a delightful warm spell for much of last week, but are now back to grey cold weather, complete with drizzles. A quick tour of the vast quarter acre estate at Casa Y-not last week reveals the following signs of Spring:

One of our aspen trees (we have six) has suddenly burst forth with lots of buds, which is exciting as there is nothing better than listening to the leaves rustle in the evening when the canyon breezes pick up.

A few of the smaller branches on our shrub roses are showing signs of greening up, so I’ll be pruning those when we get a dry day around here. Last year I pruned them back before winter and they did fine, but this time around I just cut off the excess growth and dead flowers (so the snow wouldn’t weigh them down and damage the bushes) and decided to wait until Spring to prune them. I’ll let you know how that goes.

I also discovered that some of our lettuce plants in our raised beds either survived the winter or have already sprouted or self-sown. I wonder if this means I should start planting something soon?

What should/could you be planting now?

What can I plant now? Well, per Urban Farmer, apparently there are all sorts of things, including beets and broccoli. I tried broccoli last year, but the plants got too big and bolted. Maybe I’ll try beets this year. I love roasted beets in a salad.

Another resource, called Gardenate.com, allows you to enter in your plant hardiness zone and check to see what you should be planting each month.

Apparently, those of us who are still at risk of having more snow don’t have to let that stop us! The folks at GardenDesign.com provide a handy step-by-step guide for sowing in the snow. As I recall, several of our morons (and ‘ettes) swore by this technique on earlier threads as a great way to develop very hardy plants. The idea in this case is to repurpose plastic milk containers as miniature greenhouses into which you place soil and seeds. Then set them outside where they can be snowed on, rained on, and “sunshined” on until the seedlings are ready to transplant. Looks cool!

Let’s talk about raised beds

Cursed as we are with hard, root-riddled clay soil here at Casa Y-not, the mister and I quickly realized that if we were going to get anything to grow, we’d need to install raised beds. After one year’s experience all I can say is “Where WERE these when I was growing up!?!”

Being impatient to start, I did very little research into the hows and whys of this kind of gardening beforehand. Even without that preparation, we had decent success right out of the gate and are really eager to get an earlier start this year now that the beds are already built.

If you haven’t done raised bed gardening before, there are many great primers on the subject, including this one courtesy of Popular Mechanics that surveys the basic concept, considerations in locating your bed, and design ideas. I confess that jumping in as we did (and, again, being very lazy gardeners) we did not try to incorporate an irrigation system nor did we consider the idea of building the frame for a “greenhouse” structure to cover them. Both seem like good ideas to me (although, frankly, I really do enjoy standing there with the hose each day watering them).

Courtesy of DougGreensGarden.com, here’s a handy troubleshooting guide to address some of the downsides with raised beds.

Now that you have some of the basics, let’s talk a little more about designs. You can make them out of all sorts of materials, from stone to concrete to “polywood” to lumber. If I had a lot of money, I’d definitely go with something like the ones featured in this picture from Better Homes and Gardens:

BHGraisedbeds.jpg

What a gorgeous garden. I hope the greedy one-percenters who own this garden are Republicans, at least!

Not having won the (non-existent) Utah Lottery, we settled for something considerably less grand:

OurRaisedBeds.jpg

Three of our five raised beds are located in the sunniest part of our yard, on the southern side.

I looked long and hard for the tallest, largest bed I could afford. These beds are 4 foot square. The deep section is 18 inches tall and the lower level is 9 inches tall. The trellis (which was a bitch to assemble) extends 36 inches above the upper bed; it was great for our early Spring snap peas, but not much help for the tomato plants we put in later on. One thing I especially like about this particular kit was the use of long metal pins in lieu of screws for assembly. So, in theory, we can disassemble and move them, should we desire. Two of the beds (not pictured here) are under our aspen trees, so we may wind up moving them if and when we get around to that dryscaping (patio) project I mentioned a couple of weeks ago.

Sadly, they don’t seem to offer these bi-level beds for sale at present, but the single-level version seems to still be available. (I think ordering through Amazon helps the Head Ewok pay the monthly waxing bills.)

Alternatively, there are many raised bed designs available on the web. Here’s one I thought was particularly good courtesy of Sunset Magazine. This design measures 8 feet by 4 feet and costs $172 to build.

I have to say, I think most raised beds out there are simply too short. (I guess, like Gingy, a bed can never be too high for me!) What can I say? I don’t like to bend at my age. And, I’d like the option, at least, of planting things that have deep roots. Speaking of which, Earth Easy provides handy charts detailing plant heights and soil depth requirements to help you plan your garden.

Once you’ve set up your beds, you’ll need to fill them. The good people at Gardeners.com provide this handy calculator for estimating your soil needs. (I realize this is child’s play for 99% of morons and moronettes, but based on what I’ve seen from the current administration, “Math Is Hard!”).

Flying blind last year, we filled our beds with a mix of garden soil, peat moss, and vermiculite, which turns out to be not too different from what some people recommend. There was some soil settling over the winter, but we expected that and will be adding to the beds before planting again. Make sure to follow that link for other soil mix recommendations.

What sort of experience do you folks have with raised bed gardening?


Blog of the Week

While I was cruising the internet this week learning about winter sowing, I stumbled across A Garden for the House by blogger Kevin Lee Jacobs who lives in the Hudson Valley (zone 5-b). I loved the mix of gardening, food, and lifestyle posts, so it’s my Blog of the Week.


To wrap up this week, how about a gardening-related song? Here’s comedic song-meister Heywood Banks performing “The Weasel” (an ode to the garden weasel):




Happy gardening!

Posted by: Open Blogger at 11:55 AM | Comments (166)
Post contains 1937 words, total size 13 kb.

1 Have at it, gardeners!

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 11:57 AM (zDsvJ)

2 I'll go get the others.

Posted by: The (Other) Others at March 01, 2014 11:57 AM (SCB1g)

3 Hope the links all work. I gotta go feed The Man, but I'll bbl.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 12:00 PM (zDsvJ)

4 That horse looks a little on the skinny side.

Posted by: Ronster at March 01, 2014 12:01 PM (puNd6)

5 Afternoon all,

Wondering if anyone has suggestions for stopping suckers? from popping up around an oak tree? The tree is pretty large and we have grass down underneath. The past year or so the suckers have been popping up all over the yard. I usually just mow them down, but they come back up. The grass is uncomfortable to walk on barefoot now since it has the stems still poking out.

I dont want to kill the tree, so I wasnt sure what else I could do

Posted by: Brewer at March 01, 2014 12:01 PM (WjMgb)

6 We came close to having the gardening thread on the news thread this morning.  Lot of people talking about dogwoods in their area blooming already.  Here the Bradford Pears are just budding out and they are normally the first to bloom.  I have a red camellia that is just starting to bloom though.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 12:01 PM (T2V/1)

7 Are those female mooses?

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 12:02 PM (T2V/1)

8 Or possibly mules.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 12:02 PM (T2V/1)

9 5  Posted by: Brewer at March 01, 2014 05:01 PM (WjMgb)


Clip them off at ground level with pruning shears.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 12:03 PM (T2V/1)

10 Vic, they're moose. The smaller could be a juvenile male.

Posted by: Gingy @GingyNorth at March 01, 2014 12:04 PM (N/cFh)

11 Kill my rose bush, Kill my rose bush. Dogs' chain keeps gettin' wrapped around it, Kill my rose bush.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Rounding Error Extraordinaire at March 01, 2014 12:04 PM (4mQWw)

12 10 Vic, they're moose. The smaller could be a juvenile male.

Posted by: Gingy @GingyNorth at March 01, 2014 05:04 PM (N/cFh)


The one on the left looks like she is starving.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 12:08 PM (T2V/1)

13 Thanks Vic

Any idea if the suckers are a sign of a sick tree or is this something they normally do?

Posted by: Brewer at March 01, 2014 12:08 PM (WjMgb)

14 13 Thanks Vic

Any idea if the suckers are a sign of a sick tree or is this something they normally do?

Posted by: Brewer at March 01, 2014 05:08 PM (WjMgb)


No I get them all the time with my apple trees.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 12:09 PM (T2V/1)

15 >>Wondering if anyone has suggestions for stopping suckers? from popping up around an oak tree? I have a lot of aspens that pop up, including in my neighbor's yard. I hope to heck whatever she does to get rid of them doesn't hurt my trees. Vic, the tree I miss the most from my days growing up in Maryland is the dogwood, especially those wild ones with the white flowers. So pretty.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 12:09 PM (zDsvJ)

16 You know who uses a lot of raised beds? The people of the Ukraine, and look what that got them.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:12 PM (hn70M)

17 15  Vic, the tree I miss the most from my days growing up in Maryland is the dogwood, especially those wild ones with the white flowers. So pretty.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 05:09 PM (zDsvJ)


My road here has a ton of them.  When everything is in full bloom I'll take a picture and send it to CDB and he can forward it to you for the gardening thread.  This road is really beautiful in the Spring.



Shame we can't just post out e-mail address due to slugs.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 12:13 PM (T2V/1)

18 Awesome garden/raised beds, Y-not. I simply cannot wait to move from Floriduh to Utah in a couple of years!

Also, WeirdDave, loved your raised bed story and the part about if you'd said you were going to abort is so true. Don't smoke pot but pay Gosnell! as Roe vs Wade! Unreal.

My gardening this year may consist of only planting on back and front porches due to growing fear of snakes and/or annoying bugs. I just can't deal with the whole jungle thing anymore without my doggie protecting me (not that he would have, but I was braver when he was a live). So, succulents I don't seem to kill with neglect and it gets hot. Also for a few planters in my bathroom where I randomly kill things as I am, apparently, a plant murderer. I blame this administration for my moods.

 Also going to plant seeds in peat pots to plant near back porch and pool as, stupid squirrels watch me plant and steal seeds...as if it were not bad enough here. *you may hate the feet of snow in  your yard right now, morons, but, you do not have the degree of hatred I have for gardening on an island....ok, you say, palm trees! hibiscus!  Which are all well and good...but not when  you want tulips. Bite moi.

I do have to admit it is quite lovely here in January and February through May and then! hurricane season! bah.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 12:15 PM (baL2B)

19 My road here has a ton of them. When everything is in full bloom I'll take a picture and send it to CDB and he can forward it to you for the gardening thread. This road is really beautiful in the Spring. --- I bet! I also loved Houston around this time of year. Azaleas there are spectacular. We used to go to the iirc Hogg Mansion Gardens to enjoy them. Around these parts our best spring displays are probably from the lilac bushes, which grow really well here.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 12:16 PM (zDsvJ)

20 Here's a raised bed tip: Drainage. One thing raised beds can't handle well is overwatering. A week of unexpected rain can lead to soggy beds and root rot.

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:17 PM (ZMFtH)

21 Actually ran out to pick up soil, peat, and vermiculite from our garden center today. Got some seed packets while I was at it. I might see if the snap peas will happily start from seed. The starts we planted early last year did really well.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 12:17 PM (zDsvJ)

22 Damn, mooses in the garden. And I complain about the deer! While the pesky white-tailed deer in the SF Bay Area will chomp on ANYTHING left unprotected in a garden, their appetites and mouth size just don't compare to the majestic moose. Even so: A goddamn deer tore a major limb off my Satsuma tangerine tree a few days ago, practically killing it. Also just ate half the tangerines, one bite each, gobble-gulp! Grrrrrrrr!!!!! I admit the deer are entertaining to look at, but they are fearsome garden pests. And the only way to keep them out is a minimum 8-foot-high impenetrable fence entirely surrounding your garden area. Anything less and they will go over or through it.

Posted by: zombie at March 01, 2014 12:18 PM (mizYg)

23 I have a raised bed 40' long that has 7 foot deer fencing for our raspberries. 
This is located in Idaho just South of the Canadian border zone 5a because of a microclimate influenced by the adjacent river. Otherwise pushing a 4.

We raised the bed because the ground was too wet, and raspberries hate wet feet.
We lined the raised beds with screening to keep out the voles and ground squirrels.
We fenced it because of deer, but it was the beaver who ultimately got our goat prior to the fencing.

One morning in the fall I looked out and saw my entire set of canes for next years fruit floating in mounds all the way across the river toward their dam. Bah. vermin.

Anyhoo, raised beds or not, grass tends to invade, and we have a particularly strong (think basket weaving strength) grass native to the river and it insists upon itself.  Two years ago my husband helpfully used roundup to kill the grass around the borders of the bed.  Raspberries sucker and wander anywhere.  Unfortunately little shoots hidden in the grass also got hit and since they are attached to the main plant, they suffered greatly.  Don't do this. 

I thought that since they were leafed out, perhaps hitting the area with round up while the canes were dormant (no green leaves, no bud break) in early spring when the grass greens up might solve the problem.

So I called the local garden personality on the radio this am, and she said
since the new canes from last year for fruiting this year are green, no go.  Theyll take it up and die. 

Your only option is to hand paint or sponge on the roundup selectively on the offending grass, very deliberately, to avoid touching any part of the plant. 

Phooey is all I have to say about that.


Posted by: Derak at March 01, 2014 12:19 PM (xEkHi)

24 I'd be willing to do a garden like that. For a moose in the freezer.

Posted by: Erowmero at March 01, 2014 12:21 PM (OONaw)

25 Was I supposed to chase them away?

Posted by: Doggie at March 01, 2014 12:21 PM (YgTB4)

26 last year was my first attempt at a raised bed. The only plants that came up were tomatoes and celery. Any advice for a gardener that has to deal with vicious wind storms?

Posted by: L, elle at March 01, 2014 12:21 PM (0xqKe)

27 last year was my first attempt at a raised bed. The only plants that came up were tomatoes and celery. Any advice for a gardener that has to deal with vicious wind storms? Posted by: L, elle at March 01, 2014 05:21 PM (0xqKe) Fixed Row Covers over 3/4" PVC Frames.

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:22 PM (ZMFtH)

28 Also, wind rows of trees and or berries.

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:24 PM (ZMFtH)

29 Bands with flowers/plants in their name :

Guns N' Roses.

The Wallflowers

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:24 PM (hn70M)

30 This year I'm having tremendous success with lacinato kale. Growing like wildfire! Super-delicious, super-healthy too. Sauteed' raw salad, cole slaw-ized, any ol' thang: can't go wrong with it. I eat half a pound per day and more keeps growing, more than I can even handle! I can feel the healthiness, oozing through my veins.

Posted by: zombie at March 01, 2014 12:26 PM (mizYg)

31 Bands with flowers/plants in their name : Nashville Pussy The Slits

Posted by: Zombie O'Keefe at March 01, 2014 12:26 PM (ZMFtH)

32 Red Hot Chili Peppers

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:26 PM (hn70M)

33 Our azaleas (yes, one normal bush that we have here) has been blooming since Christmas they are so confused. They have enjoyed all of the rain. Seattle has moved here. If we have a drought this summer I will be shocked as the sun is most welcome. So, I lied. We have azaleas that I somehow forgot about and are still blooming.

 My son, on mainland and in an oak wood, has one camellia bush that has flowers in the winter. bah. I come from the deep South where those bushes grew as high as the roof.

In fact, I missed camellias so much my late grandmother sent me some buds in a cardboard dress box with moistened cotton, blooming, through the US mail. It was deja vu to read an Eudora Welty book about her mother doing the same thing whe she was living in NYC (and this is no lie: my grandmother and aunt had their hair done weekly with Eudora and her mother at the beauty shop in Jackson...so guess maybe that is where my grandmother got the idea. One of my former students was doing a paper on Miss Eudora and I had her call "Fannie Mae's" on a Friday and she got an interview with her). Back then the ladies had their hair washed and set weekly and somehow it stayed that way until the next time they met up at the beauty shop. I have not yet figured this out as it would drive me insane.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 12:27 PM (baL2B)

34 How about just the guitarist? Poison Ivy

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:28 PM (ZMFtH)

35 Thanks Garret. I live on a rocky hillside so the soil is no good. The year before last I stupidly tried to grow tomatoes and flowers in big planters. The wind cut them all down.

Posted by: L, elle at March 01, 2014 12:29 PM (0xqKe)

36 22 I admit the deer are entertaining to look at, but they are fearsome garden pests. And the only way to keep them out is a minimum 8-foot-high impenetrable fence entirely

Yep. And they seem to think that roses were put on this earth as a special treat for deer.

Posted by: Splunge at March 01, 2014 12:29 PM (qyomX)

37 The Black Eyed Peas

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:30 PM (hn70M)

38 Argh. Typed a long comment about what kinds of potatoes we're going to try and grow and in what and such and it got eaten by the hamsters. This is what I ordered from Amazon: Bosmere K705 Potato Deck-Patio Grow Planter Bag.

Posted by: Mama AJ at March 01, 2014 12:32 PM (SUKHu)

39 Porcupine Tree

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:32 PM (ZMFtH)

40 Smashing Pumpkins

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:34 PM (hn70M)

41 I added to my usual garden an herb garden (from seed) in a raised bed last year. Had good success, and produced enough basil to make a single batch of homemade pesto. This year, I'm planting a 60' row of basil. That. Freaking. Good.

Posted by: Charts and Darts at March 01, 2014 12:35 PM (kqrEG)

42 You really don't want for your dog to tangle with a moose.

An experienced cattle dog, mayyyyyyyybe. Who knows when and how to nip without getting kicked or trampled.

An inexperienced lab, nooooooo.

Posted by: torquewrench at March 01, 2014 12:35 PM (gqT4g)

43 We use raised beds. We have 15 6x12 and four 4x12 beds for vegetables & herbs, a 4x20 raspberry bed, a 4x20 asparagus bed, tomatoes & peppers are in numerous large pots, plus we plant rows of sweet corn & potatoes on the border of the orchard, and for the deer that jumps the fence we have a 12 gauge slug gun that protects the garden and puts meat in the freezer. dy. However, with more snow coming down right now to add to the 20+" already on the land and the ground frozen to about 3' the only thing I have growing is spinach in the cold frame. Everyone should have a cold frame or 2.

Posted by: Angel with a sword at March 01, 2014 12:36 PM (hpgw1)

44

Raised beds are great. 

Those concrete ones in the picture are the way to go, for sure...if you want to go to trouble.

Because the wood-sided ones will rot out over time.

 

Something I have to deal with is things sprouting up too early...from warm days in Jan. or Feb.

Then, when the cold returns, the young sprouts get nuked.

 

I use buckets and large plastic tubs, inverted over the plants to protect them.

But if you don't take them off after the sun comes up...the plants suffocate or something, and the damage can be worse than the cold.

 

I've thrown sheets over rose bushes to protect them from the cold.

This works pretty good, if there isn't much wind.

 

Another great Gardening Thread!

Thanks Y-not and WeirdDave.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 12:36 PM (QsHQT)

45 If you're planting peas or beans, add out a soil inoculant. It fixates nitrogen to the roots and helps strengthen the plant and produce more.

Posted by: seamrog at March 01, 2014 12:36 PM (VvwIJ)

46 23 I have a raised bed 40' long that has 7 foot deer fencing for our raspberries. Derak Seven foot just won't do it. A neighbor has a 6.5 foot fence around one side of her back yard. Couldn't figure out how the deer kept getting in. Then one evening, as we were watching from inside the house, a deer that was calmly STANDING on the other side of the fence just casually went airborne and cleared the fence in one quick leap. Stuck the landing too -- no running head start, and just stopped still where it landed and kept munching. Unreal. It could easily have cleared another foot without much additional effort. Maybe we got special pole-vaulting deer in this part of this country, and your sub-species isn't so agile, but I'd still recommend more than 7'.

Posted by: zombie at March 01, 2014 12:36 PM (mizYg)

47 Soundgarden.

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:37 PM (ZMFtH)

48 29 Bands with flowers/plants in their name : The Rapberries Blind Melon The Hollies Black Oak Arkansas

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:38 PM (8MjqI)

49 Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:38 PM (hn70M)

50 Herb Alpert AND the Tijuana Brass

Damn "and" sign, screw you Pixy!

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:39 PM (hn70M)

51 7 foot will work best if there's a fixed top rail. But you really want to go to 8 with a rail.

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:40 PM (ZMFtH)

52 The Lemonheads

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:40 PM (ZMFtH)

53 Zombie...a crossbow makes no noise, and venison stew is really good.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 12:41 PM (QsHQT)

54 The Mamas and Papayas

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:42 PM (8MjqI)

55 Cypress Hill.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:43 PM (hn70M)

56 Moby Grape

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:44 PM (8MjqI)

57 The Cauliflowers.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:44 PM (hn70M)

58 Morris Day and the Thyme

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:45 PM (ZMFtH)

59

I live in 6a.  I had a garden and got tired of weeds.  When I first bought the house, I just rototilled the grass.  After a few years of good tomatoes, etc, I put in a raised bed on the cheap.  Bought 2 12x2x8's and Lowes cut them in half for me.  Screwed them together and plopped in the old garden plot.  Put weed barrier on the bottom and filled with potting soil, vermiculite, peat and some orangic local soil.  Worked like a charm.  The next year I put in two more.  The year after that I had to tear down the old 6 foot cedar fence and replace it so I kept all the 4x4's and built a 'frame' around the 3 beds.  I put weed barrier in that and filled with river gravel.  Looks pretty nice and easy to weed and didn't cost much.

 

Last year I added about a 20x10 garden next to it for the tomatoes and corn (a first, which failed) but the toms went crazy.  Put a 4x4 border around it too.  Have to try something different with the corn tho.  Any corn growing tips?  Oh, by the by, the section I tilled last year was, luckily awesome soil as most of it was river sediment.  Not sure why it was so good, but I am thankful.  Can't wait to get started again.  2 weeks to start seeds.

Posted by: Infidel at March 01, 2014 12:45 PM (Xl7GC)

60 The Roots.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:45 PM (hn70M)

61 Hall and Oats.

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:45 PM (8MjqI)

62 I'm growing more snow here today. So far it's grown about three inches since this morning, with another couple of inches growth expected by nightfall. What a remarkable plant.

Posted by: grammie winger at March 01, 2014 12:45 PM (oMKp3)

63 Wow, Derak! That sounds impressive.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 12:45 PM (zDsvJ)

64 You can keep deer out of your garden (for a while) with only a four-foot high fence. The trick is running a single hot wire, about 30" high about three feet outside the fence. The deer like to walk up to a fence before vaulting over. They tend to ignore the hot wire. It's fun watching them electrocute themselves. Once they figure it out, you have to shoot and eat them.

Posted by: Charts and Darts at March 01, 2014 12:46 PM (kqrEG)

65 61 Hall and Oats. Posted by: bergerbilde


That's how ya know ace isn't around, it took that long.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:46 PM (hn70M)

66 Leaf.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 12:47 PM (hn70M)

67 Gardening thread contribution: Dug a hole. Stuck a loquat tree in the ground. Then it started raining again.

Posted by: JEM at March 01, 2014 12:47 PM (o+SC1)

68 Seaweed

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:47 PM (ZMFtH)

69 The Rolling Stones (I have a lot of stones in my garden)

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:48 PM (8MjqI)

70 Peaches and Herb

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:48 PM (ZMFtH)

71 In the future I hope to have raised beds for herbs and vegetables. At one point, over a decade ago, my husband raised a bed for me and it has since sunk into the sand with my last bit of energy. You have to re-topsoil yearly here just to stay ahead of the sand. I had all sorts of stuff blooming at one time, and antique roses! a few still live. But then "cutter bees" invaded and ate all the rose leaves and...pfft, I gave up. A few still bloom, bless their rose hips. If you like roses I highly recommend Antique Rose Emporium out of Texas. If I ever get out of here I have plans!

I recently saw (in magazine) a raised bed of succulents and other plants in cinderblock, used as a privacy fence. Of course I would probably do this and snakes would think they were condos for them. It looked very pretty, however. It would be awesome for herbs and cherry tomatoes and a kitchen garden.

I have seen snakes, the black kind (and no, I do not care that they are non-poisonous as they still freak me out) go up the screen pool enclosure chasing lizards on the gardenia (so, in May, I do have those blooms). The snakes twine around anything, fences, straight up screens, etc. As long as I am inside looking out it is gross but ok. Once one of them get inside, though, I am out of here. Husband claims it is not possible. Riight.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 12:49 PM (baL2B)

72 I want a large table (on casters) for growing greens.

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:49 PM (ZMFtH)

73 Emerson, Lake and Palmer

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:50 PM (8MjqI)

74 I miss gardenias, jasmine, mock oranges, and real citrus trees from our time in SoCal. Not enough to move back there, but still.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 12:50 PM (zDsvJ)

75 The Beetles

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:50 PM (8MjqI)

76

L'elle....I have to deal with a lot of wind too.

 

Using stakes, sturdy ones that are well-grounded, has worked well for me.

You have to tie up the plants at intervals, up and down the length of the plant...not just in one place.

 

Something that works good for ties...are those plastic-covered flat things on the top of bags of coffee.

I rip them off the coffee bags and save them.

These are also good for tying up Orchids.

 

Old rubber hoses are also good for using as supports for bushes and large plants.

I cut them in the lengths I need...then run some hangar-wire through them, extending the wire out the ends of the hose, to twist to the other wire end or hook onto stakes.

 

You can get nice metal garden stakes at Lowes, Home Depot or Tracker Supply.

 

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 12:50 PM (QsHQT)

77 The Screaming Trees

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:52 PM (ZMFtH)

78

Hmm...autocorrect doesn't view 'tractor' as a word if it is capitalized?

 

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 12:53 PM (QsHQT)

79 (Garden) TOOL

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:53 PM (ZMFtH)

80

I miss gardenias, jasmine, mock oranges, and real citrus trees from our time in SoCal.

Not enough to move back there, but still.

 

And the Avacados!  Yum.  Used to snag them once in a while till we almost got shot. 

Posted by: Infidel at March 01, 2014 12:53 PM (Xl7GC)

81 -8 here in NH this morning, the sun is getting stronger every day. The hothouse is running up to 85 degs by day. My experimental propagation chamber is up and running. The kitty litter container full of water only brings humitiy up to 45% is this enough?? Temp is holding at 80 deg. I am starting peppers and tomatoes in it this week using jiffy pellets in trays. My wife has 3 raised beds in her garden. I have no use for them. Because my wife and I can't agree on techniques she has her garden. 70' x 100'. Mine is 60' x 90'. I turn and harrow both gardens with an old Farmall Super C. I'm ready to get going

Posted by: NativeNH at March 01, 2014 12:54 PM (jWWfL)

82 Does anyone know what will keep the frigging squirrels’ away? They have been eating my roses for 12 years? I have tried everything, including to my horror, some coyote urine. I almost passed out when I opened it. That was 12 years ago & it may have been some other natural predator but it only repelled me & wore off after a few days. I have tried garlic, moth balls (When did they get so expensive?), tea bags, above mentioned urine, Deer repellent, something from HD to keep squirrels away & last but not least an electronic repeller for them. I can’t remember the name of it, a friend recommended it & it emits a high frequency sound but it did not work either. I paid to have electrician ( neighbor) to put electrical outlet outside but it didn’t work. Now I’m going to have to go to the basement & look at what it is called. I bought it in 2009 right after Ted Kennedy died. I remember my friend is a republican in IL & she called me while his funeral was on all cable & or network channels. She had told me about it but didn’t remember name. I asked her to go look at brand name & she called me that Saturday morning.

Posted by: Carol at March 01, 2014 12:54 PM (z4WKX)

83 Strawberry Alarm Clock

Posted by: Insomniac at March 01, 2014 12:55 PM (UAMVq)

84 The Beet Farmers

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:55 PM (ZMFtH)

85 We have raised beds. Don't really know what to say about them. Having finished banging my head against the sewing machine, back to potato talk. I want to grow purple potatoes, because we've been enjoying eating them. Gonna try getting a couple store bought ones to sprout, because the local feed and seed only had basic varieties of red and white. I can buy a 2 lb bag online, but I only need a few for the potato growing bags we bought. If I can get purple majesty and Yukon gold potatoes to grow, I can make LSU potato salad!

Posted by: Mama AJ at March 01, 2014 12:55 PM (SUKHu)

86 Posted by: NativeNH at March 01, 2014 05:54 PM (jWWfL) I don't care for raised beds either.

Posted by: grammie winger at March 01, 2014 12:55 PM (oMKp3)

87 Peter and Gourdon

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:55 PM (8MjqI)

88 Korn

Posted by: Insomniac at March 01, 2014 12:57 PM (UAMVq)

89 Squirrel are eating the buds, Carol? Douching them with Tobasco will help with that. But you need to re-apply after a few days, or after rain/spray watering. Pellet Rifle works well and only requires one application per rodent. Also, bonus : free squirrel meat for gumbo!

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 12:58 PM (ZMFtH)

90 The Roots

Posted by: Insomniac at March 01, 2014 12:58 PM (UAMVq)

91 Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 12:59 PM (8MjqI)

92 Gin Blossoms in here, yet?

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 01:00 PM (ZMFtH)

93 Herb Alpert

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 01:00 PM (8MjqI)

94

71...The snakes twine around anything, fences, straight up screens, etc. As long as I am inside looking out it is gross but ok. Once one of them get inside, though, I am out of here. Husband claims it is not possible. Riight.

 

---------

 

Yeah, ChristyB...snakes can get in the house.

I had to kill one in my laundry room one time.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 01:00 PM (QsHQT)

95 Green Day

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 01:00 PM (zDsvJ)

96 Bush.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 01:07 PM (hn70M)

97 Piers Morgan story over at WeaselZip is funny... at least he didn't post it on his blog.

Posted by: garrett at March 01, 2014 01:08 PM (ZMFtH)

98 Is there some reason you guys are trying to screw this thread up with all this band crap?

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 01:09 PM (T2V/1)

99 I dunno, Vic. I assumed it's a Thing, so I was just gonna roll with it.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 01:10 PM (zDsvJ)

100 Posted by: Vic


Yes.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 01:10 PM (hn70M)

101 Elvis Parsley

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 01:10 PM (8MjqI)

102 I've always found a Ruger 10-22 very useful as a squirrel deterant. The old beagle worked good too but she's long gone

Posted by: NativeNH at March 01, 2014 01:10 PM (jWWfL)

103 Garrett, they are eating everything, including the thorns. I have three arbors in the back yard & they jump on them and break the climbers I have trained on them. I also have sprayed ammonia & vinegar all around them.

Posted by: Carol at March 01, 2014 01:10 PM (z4WKX)

104 OK, I see what they are doing.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 01:10 PM (T2V/1)

105 Thanks Wheatie. Really good advice for whenever the hell the snow stops here.

Posted by: L, elle at March 01, 2014 01:11 PM (0xqKe)

106 If we go garden related : The Honeydrippers*


*And lets face it, with The Beetles we're sort of there.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 01:13 PM (hn70M)

107 My gardening experiment this year is bees. Mason bees, which don't make hives and therefore aren't territorial/aggressive, but they pollinate and are native to the area. They cocoon and go dormant in the winter here, so they are resting comfortably in my refrigerator's vegetable crisper until things warm up and start blooming. (That's what the nice bee people said to do when I ordered them.) I had crappy fruit setting last year because of poor pollination, which is why I am trying the mason bee thing. I also got them a nice little house to lay eggs in, so I can continue to have bees. We'll see if it works...

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at March 01, 2014 01:14 PM (2buaQ)

108
Yeah, ChristyB...snakes can get in the house.
I had to kill one in my laundry room one time.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 06:00 PM (QsHQT)


I will pack up my many collections of crap and head for the hills. And, dear heart, if I had to kill it I would be in some type of trance/fugue state for years on medication.

Husband knows this. I know he is fibbing to me about it as well, as all it would take would be leaving garage door open...which he does, and then stupidly leaving laundry room door open, and welcome! I will die instantly if one is inside.


And I grew up in South. I also knew not to go to creek or lake without my brother and his shotgun (he died a few years ago and I don't have the same confidence in Yankee husband, who was once saved by my brother as he stepped out of a boat at the lake. My bro told him, "Don't move" and the next thing hubby knew my brother had gotten a large limb or something and killed a copperhead near hubby's foot. egad. And there is nothing that scares me as much as a water moccasin...even in a boat I would raise my feet and brother would laugh and say "they can't jump in the boat." Right...then some friend of Daddy's would tell a tale about a "moccasin as big as a man's thigh" falling from a limb in creek. For all I know they were running a still like on Justified and just wanted me out of the way. All I know is I hate snakes every bit as much as I hate this administration. One and the same. bah.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 01:15 PM (baL2B)

109 Did anyone say the Cranberries?

Posted by: L, elle at March 01, 2014 01:16 PM (0xqKe)

110 I think the band stuff is hilarious. Heh.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 01:16 PM (QsHQT)

111

We have raised beds and find them much easier to take care of. That extra three feet off the ground also means they are slightly less likely to get hit by frost on a given night.

We water them with soaker hoses connected to an automatic watering system. Watering can be a challenge because the water leaches straight through past the depth of the roots.

No deer problems even though there are many deer in our neck of the woods. Perhaps its because we have a fence around our backyard. Of course they can jump the fence but I think they're smart enough to hit the unfenced yard simply for convenience sake.

Posted by: northernlurker at March 01, 2014 01:17 PM (Xmw9g)

112 I have no experience with raised beds or deer as garden pests, but my brother lives in the Texas hill country has both.  They have no top soil, just limestone with a thin covering of oak and deer droppings, so he built 5 or 6 concrete containers 4x12 and 3.5 ft deep and hauled in dirt from another part of Texas.  He also put a 12' fence around it made of chicken wire that looks kind of rickety but has held up for 10 years that keeps the deer out.  He grows cherry tomatoes (too hot for big ones), cucumbers, okra and cantaloupe.  A few years ago the squirrels started eating the bloom end of the cantaloupe, just a few quick bites before moving on to the next one.  Can't remember what he did about that, though he said he got rid of them somehow.  They have a lot of wild pigs moving around down there now, so he may have to improve his fence lest the pigs loot his garden.

Posted by: huerfano at March 01, 2014 01:18 PM (bAGA/)

113 Seaweed is very good for soil,both the liquid seaweed I buy from Neptune's Harvest to fertilize roses & the seaweed meal I will add to some roses that need a little extra help. I have to look at my bookmarks or favorites on Mac, I found a website that sells Neptune's Harvest liquid seaweed cheaper & with no shaping costs. I'm using iPad now. I'll post it in next week's garden thread. It's much too soon to think about roses in MA. I have to call one company that I ordered roses from in November. They decide what my proper planting time is & it's in the middle to late part of this month. It is after forsythia have bloomed here.

Posted by: Carol at March 01, 2014 01:19 PM (z4WKX)

114

ChristyB...get yourself a pellet gun.

It is very 'empowering'.

 

Practice on stuff out in the yard.

Tin cans...old garden hoses...practice until you can hit those easily.

 

Then, you'll be ready for any sort of pesky critter.

 

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 01:20 PM (QsHQT)

115 114 ChristyB...get yourself a pellet gun. It is very 'empowering'. Practice on stuff out in the yard. --- Gee, I do live fire exercises with Mr Y-not in the yard... if he forgets to take out the garbage!

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 01:25 PM (zDsvJ)

116 Mumford & Sons

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 01:26 PM (8MjqI)

117 Stone Roses

Posted by: Insomniac at March 01, 2014 01:27 PM (UAMVq)

118 As an apartment dweller, I have decided to do some vegetables on our small patio. I purchased several tomatoes from Orchard and Walmart, and ordered a few from Burpee.com. I get about 5 hours of direct sun a day on the patio, and I think that will be enough. I will stake the tomatoes when they get bigger (I'm in zone 9) but for now I set them out on the patio wall during the day and then put them up against the apartment at night to keep them slightly warmer. Wish me lock. I figure about 15 pounds of tomatoes to recoup my cost, but it's so fun I don't care that much.

Posted by: TimothyJ at March 01, 2014 01:27 PM (ep2io)

119 114 ChristyB...get yourself a pellet gun.
It is very 'empowering'.

Practice on stuff out in the yard.
Tin cans...old garden hoses...practice until you can hit those easily.

Then, you'll be ready for any sort of pesky critter.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 06:20 PM (QsHQT)


Will it work on barky shit-zoos and an equally annoying neighbor who looks like a caveman? Will ask husband for this for birthday in summer! Unfortunately if I am aiming at snake I will be so freaked out I will shoot holes in ceiling and foot off. I am going to have another glass of wine at the thought of a snake in my laundry room.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 01:28 PM (baL2B)

120 >>I had crappy fruit setting last year because of poor pollination That has been suggested as one of the reasons we didn't get good veggies last year. Awesome, wonderful, huge plants...and puny little veggies. The weather might have also been a factor. So I need to get some pots and put some bright flowers in them near the garden.

Posted by: Mama AJ at March 01, 2014 01:29 PM (SUKHu)

121 Chuck Berry

Posted by: scrood at March 01, 2014 01:29 PM (wvPFe)

122 Good luck, TimothyJ! We had years and years of patio and deck "gardening." It's really only been in the past 7 or so years that we could do in-ground gardening.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 01:29 PM (zDsvJ)

123 107 Posted by: Sabrina Chase at March 01, 2014 06:14 PM (2buaQ)


LOL, I have some that don't build hives too.  The make holes in the ground.  They are yellow jackets and they swarm up and get you when mowing.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 01:29 PM (T2V/1)

124 Corn-- unless you protect it, you're just *feeding the birds*  lol.

I used 2 ft wide chickenwire, cut 4 ft length and threaded 3 ft stakes thru at the long sides, then folded and pinched the ends shut to make about 6-inch-high miniature row covers.  It only keep birds out, mice/rats would still get the kernels.

So next time I pre-sprouted the corn on damp papertowels, in cheapo covered 'gladware' on top of the fridge.  (Took about 3 to 7 days iirc)

When roots were about half- to inch-long, made hole in soil with a pencil and dropped in seedling.  Put chickenwire thingy over them until plants were a couple of inches tall. 

I guess the mice didn't like it once the corn had begun to sprout? 

Anyway...good luck.

Posted by: JeanQ at March 01, 2014 01:30 PM (82lr7)

125 Just half an hour ago, my son shot a possum in our yard. I figure any possum or coon that is wandering around in daytime is probably sick.

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 01:30 PM (8MjqI)

126 http://tinyurl.com/ltydmnf Above is link to Do My Own Pest Control for Neptune’s Harvest liquid seaweed fertilizer. It’s cheaper than Neptune’s Harvest website. I’m 95% sure if you spend enough you do not have to pay shipping, at least not last year. I don’t know what I have down in the basement. I will check before I order anything. I did find Talstar concentrate there for 3/4 of a gallon for $50, vs $100 for a quart two years ago.

Posted by: Carol at March 01, 2014 01:31 PM (z4WKX)

127 Moss.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 01:32 PM (hn70M)

128 If you are having problems with pollination, plant some borage. It is a bee magnet.

Posted by: seamrog at March 01, 2014 01:33 PM (VvwIJ)

129 Peyote.

Posted by: Dr Spank at March 01, 2014 01:34 PM (hn70M)

130 Buddy Holly (that's a 2fer)

Posted by: bergerbilder at March 01, 2014 01:34 PM (8MjqI)

131 My next door neighbor is a hunter & he’s got guns. You cannot shoot squirrels in this state, Massachusetts.

Posted by: Carol at March 01, 2014 01:34 PM (z4WKX)

132 108  Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 06:15 PM (baL2B)


Some folks were pulling your leg.  I have lived in the South almost all my life.  Spent a lot of time in the swamps as a kid.  I have never seen a water moccasin as big as a man's thigh. Also they can not climb trees, although they can slither around in a bush next to the water.  But generally they stay in the water.


I have kicked over a rotten stump that had a ball of them that had hatched there. 100's of them about the size of your little finger.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 01:34 PM (T2V/1)

133 115...Haaa, Y-not.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 01:35 PM (QsHQT)

134 The Gardenate.com link states I can plant my carrots in zone 5A. If I dig out the 12 " of snow, pick axe the frozen soil and heat it up with a propane blower, I'll be good to go. I think spring will be late in southern Wisconsin.

Posted by: Barbara at March 01, 2014 01:35 PM (73mB5)

135 TimothyJ, your effort will be repaid with the first bite of juicy, tasty, naturally ripened tomato!

A song for you:

youtube.com/watch?v=nitgmAInI18

Posted by: JeanQ at March 01, 2014 01:36 PM (82lr7)

136 I have kicked over a rotten stump that had a ball of them that had hatched there. 100's of them about the size of your little finger. --- I'd pee myself and I'm not really especially afraid of snakes. But hundreds of little ones? Pee-time.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 01:36 PM (zDsvJ)

137 Ace up

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 01:36 PM (T2V/1)

138

119...Will ask husband for this for birthday in summer! Unfortunately if I am aiming at snake I will be so freaked out I will shoot holes in ceiling and foot off.

 

---------

 

That's why you need to do some target practice on an old garden hose.

 

You could even paint a little snakey-face on it, and aim for that.

With snakes, as with most things...you wanna aim for the head.

 

And pellets don't make very big holes in the wall.

They're way smaller than a .22 pistol, or something larger.

Posted by: wheatie at March 01, 2014 01:40 PM (QsHQT)

139 And pellets don't make very big holes in the wall.
They're way smallerthan a .22 pistol, or something larger.


....and much quieter.

Posted by: JeanQ at March 01, 2014 01:41 PM (82lr7)

140 59 Corn needs to be planted at least three rows wide for proper self-pollination...

Posted by: Spun and Murky at March 01, 2014 01:42 PM (4DCSq)

141 Thanks JeanQ.  MamaAJ, I always plant marigolds around the garden and beds, bees like them and seems to keep the bugs away.

Posted by: Infidel at March 01, 2014 01:45 PM (Xl7GC)

142 Up there somewhere was the question about corn that didn't "make". Corn pollinates each other, so a square of it actually works better than the long rows. Maybe try that.

Posted by: Mr. Dave at March 01, 2014 01:49 PM (vBKG5)

143 Oh, to ChristyB: I had to pull a medium size rat snake out of the pantry with welding gloves. I was **that** close to putting a hole in the wall.

Posted by: Mr. Dave at March 01, 2014 01:51 PM (vBKG5)

144
I have kicked over a rotten stump that had a ball of them that had hatched there. 100's of them about the size of your little finger.

Posted by: Vic at March 01, 2014 06:34 PM (T2V/1)


Oh, lawd. Nightmares. The man who described the snake as "big as a man's thigh" was some buddy of my late father's. I dunno. They grow 'em big in Mississippi. My brother went further to freak me out and said he could smell them nesting. egad. My Dad and that brother are both, sadly as I loved them madly, gone in the last five years. Maybe there is something down in that creek they wanted hidden...and, it worked! I do know the moccasins were large, but did not get out my tape measure for proof. I would rather deal with a gator than a snake, no lie. My Daddy was a fine and upstanding man, but maybe his buddies drank a six pack or so when they fished his lake for bass or bream. I saw enough Tarzan movies to believe that creek maybe had monsters (it did have a few caves with weird stuff growing inside when I did explore with brother and cousin in dead of winter). We still own this land, but I am not an explorer and will not challenge the snake myths of yore.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 01:55 PM (baL2B)

145 Speaking of cross-pollination, I planted 3 tomatillo plants last year. I was trying to get three of the same variety, but wound up with 2 of one and 1 of another. Per usual, I did not read before jumping into. So they made plenty of flowers but no fruits. THEN I read and saw they needed to cross-pollinate... so I pollinated them by hand. It worked! I only had to do it a couple of times and then maybe the bees took over.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 01:56 PM (zDsvJ)

146 143 Oh, to ChristyB: I had to pull a medium size rat snake out of the pantry with welding gloves. I was **that** close to putting a hole in the wall.

Posted by: Mr. Dave at March 01, 2014 06:51 PM (vBKG5)


Oh. Sweet lawd. They are the orange ones? My son saw one when he was very high up a ladder de-booting a coconut palm. He said the snake was wrapped around the palm and he screamed like a girl (that's my boy! All 6'4" of him!).


Don't tell me any more until I move to Utah in two years. It may be sooner if Mr. Black Snake invades my house.

Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 01:58 PM (baL2B)

147 Y-not, I goofed on cross-pollenation too! 

Had a couple of young blueberry plants, thinking I was all smart'n'stuff to get more than one to start off....

They were the same variety, so I *still* needed another plant to get any fruit. 

Lol.

Posted by: JeanQ at March 01, 2014 02:05 PM (82lr7)

148 144 Posted by: ChristyBlinky, Judge of Raciss Morons at March 01, 2014 06:55 PM (baL2B)


I have seen some big ones but not that big.  I don't now about smelling them nesting.  That stump was the only one I have ever seen like that and it smelled like swamp and rotten stump.  I didn't try to sniff the snakes.


And BION we have gators here in a nearby lake too.

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 02:09 PM (T2V/1)

149 Rat snakes come kn a variety but this is what we have around here.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6a/Black_Rat_Snake2.jpg

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 02:11 PM (T2V/1)

150 Seven foot just won't do it.

Posted by: zombie at March 01, 2014 05:36 PM (mizYg)

Late to respond but the only saving grace is the raspberry bed is 40' by 4' wide with a 6' fence surrounding it.  The deer need to stick a true 10point landing to get inside.

On the other hand the vegetable part of the garden ,12'x20, the damn buck just ran through fence and knocked it down.  So there's that.  

We used bird netting over some other raised beds that we haven't yet put a fence up around, as well as over a strawberry patch, and surprising the deer hate it.  they get a mouth full of plastic netting and just go away.  Except for the time that the buck speared the whole shebang with his antlers and sauntered away draped with netting.

Deer. beautiful pests.  Venison roast.

Posted by: Derak at March 01, 2014 02:12 PM (xEkHi)

151 My kids are still laughing at the time I screamed at a snake. It seems that's funny if we're in the car and the snake is on the road.
Hmph. >>MamaAJ, I always plant marigolds around the garden and beds, bees like them and seems to keep the bugs away. We had a few of those in the beds. Either not enough, or that wasn't the problem. Maybe the netting kept the bees out...

Posted by: Mama AJ at March 01, 2014 02:18 PM (SUKHu)

152 We built a series of raised beds on one side of our garden, and really wouldn't have nearly as enjoyable a time without them. A couple of years back, however, I ended up replacing the redwood they had originally been built out of with plastic decking (the price of redwood having skyrocketed in the meantime).

Posted by: cthulhu at March 01, 2014 02:49 PM (T1005)

153 Daughter came over and just left.  But time for me to do my disk cleanup and go to bed. So BBT

Posted by: Vic[/i] at March 01, 2014 02:53 PM (T2V/1)

154 Nighty night Vic.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 02:58 PM (zDsvJ)

155 Well, looks like my plans for my pre-planting preparations are right out the window: http://www.weather.com/news/commuter-conditions/winter-storm-titan-latest-news-20140301

And just when I got my pollinator magnet seedlings going, too. Great.

I still have to sift out all the old plant material from the square foot gardens...they haven't broken down enough to serve as compost, and I still have to add in fresh compost to the soil mix. (If you can get your hands on Mel Bartholemew's Square Foot Gardening book, get it.  It's about average in price but has proved invaluable)

Posted by: Saber Alter at March 01, 2014 02:59 PM (DNu5Y)

156 I should also highly recommend "Square Foot Gardening" -- http://tinyurl.com/kyftbnp -- as a natural companion to raised bed planters.

Posted by: cthulhu at March 01, 2014 03:03 PM (T1005)

157 Oddly, I hadn't seen @155 when I was composing @156.

Posted by: cthulhu at March 01, 2014 03:05 PM (T1005)

158 GMTA

But seriously, even though I'm pretty good at general gardening, last year was my first attempt at an actual vegetable garden, and the square foot method was a lot easier than I thought it'd be.  I'd probably still be eating the harvest if it wasn't for the sudden pest swarm that demolished most of my crop.  At least I got a lot of homemade pesto out of it.

Posted by: Saber Alter at March 01, 2014 03:12 PM (DNu5Y)

159 Thanks, cthulhu. I had stumbled across his foundation (squarefootgardening.org) when I was doing my research, but, frankly, I couldn't make heads or tails of it.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 03:26 PM (zDsvJ)

160 So I'm not sure having this thread later in the day makes much difference. For me, it's easier to post it in the morning on Saturday (Mountain time) with the idea that ideas people have can be acted upon later in the day by a trip to the garden center. OTOH, there's no schedule per se, so we'll just roll with it.

Posted by: Y-not at March 01, 2014 03:27 PM (zDsvJ)

161 >7 Are those female mooses? I propose that the plural of moose shall be meese. Or mice. Or moosipii. Discuss amongst yourselves...

Posted by: ^;^ at March 01, 2014 03:38 PM (V3lNN)

162 This has been one mighty tasty thread.

Posted by: Erowmero at March 01, 2014 03:42 PM (OONaw)

163 Y-not, I'll enjoy the garden thread whenever you and Weirddave can post it.

Of course, the sooner the motivation strikes, the sooner we can go broke at get to the garden center.

Posted by: JeanQ at March 01, 2014 04:46 PM (82lr7)

164 Oh, and 'ditto' the recommendations for Mel Bartholomew's Square Foot Gardening! I've had a softcover copy for decades, used to watch the PBS series... Recently acquired the Kindle (updated, probably several times by now, lol) edition for nighttime reading.

Great stuff!

Posted by: JeanQ at March 01, 2014 04:52 PM (82lr7)

165 Tritto on Mel's book. I have a copy nearly 30 years old. I don't do bed gardening quite like he does but he will get your mind in the right frame if you were a hill and row gardener before.

Posted by: toby928 at March 02, 2014 04:04 AM (QupBk)

166  I used to follow the square foot gardening/raised bed method until I got the bright idea that "bigger is better" and turned several 4'x8' beds into a continuous 8'x20' bed. Now I can't reach the center to weed. There are 12" tiles for walking but I don't have the balance or dexterity anymore to weed from them. It's 12" - 18" pots for me now. I've had luck with marigolds, peppers, chives, basil, oregano and mint. I even grew a wonderful daikon radish 2 years ago.

Posted by: gingeroni at March 02, 2014 10:11 AM (y8qcS)

Hide Comments | Add Comment

Comments are disabled. Post is locked.
159kb generated in CPU 0.12, elapsed 1.0789 seconds.
62 queries taking 0.9825 seconds, 402 records returned.
Powered by Minx 1.1.6c-pink.