November 30, 2014

Food Thread: Stuffing Waffles: Yes, I Went There [CBD]
— Open Blogger

Stuffing waffle.jpg

And it was good and true and pure, and there was much rejoicing.

I used my standard corn bread and sausage stuffing, which presents a bit of a challenge because it is crumbly. Regular bread stuffing might be easier. For the last one I tossed the stuffing in a bit of whipped egg, and that seemed to hold it together nicely.

Obviously this isn't a batter that expands when heated, so it is important to pack every nook and cranny of the iron with stuffing. And don't be afraid to compress it! I mentioned this website recently -- DadCooksDinner -- mostly for the dry-brined turkey recipe. I used it last week, and it was excellent. Much easier than wet-brine, and the icing of the turkey breast before roasting seems to have made a big difference.

His recipes are not overly complicated, but don't be fooled by the name....he is a real cook, with the added benefit of being able to write clear instructions.

Here is a Moron's (speedster1) rather nice looking turkey, from a DadsCookDinner recipe.

speedster1 Turkey.JPG


Some of you live in California because of this. Although with the current destruction of the Central Valley, courtesy of the rabid environmentalists, we may have to find another place to grow a lot of our food. Victor Davis Hanson grew up in the Central Valley, and is a wise observer of the lunacy that is California.


Tyler Florence is one of my favorite mass-market chefs. His recipes may not be ethereal, but they are always solid and obviously tested and proofread before being published. His recipe for Pulled Pork Barbecue is sort of a generic "American Barbecue," but that is by no means a criticism. It tastes good, so standing on some mythical regional standard will leave you angry and hungry and sulking on the porch while everyone else eats well.


This is similar, although not identical to Emeril Lagasse's recipe.

Linguine with Clam Sauce

1 pound linguine
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 ounces chorizo or prosciutto, diced
1/2 cup finely chopped yellow onions
2 tablespoons thinly sliced garlic
1/2 teaspoon dry oregano
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 cans of whole or rough chopped clams
1 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup clam juice (from canned clams above)
1/2 cup half&half
1 oz. butter
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves
Grated Parmesan to taste

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the linguine and cook until 1 minute before al dente. Drain the pasta in a colander, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking liquid. Rinse the pasta in cold water to stop cooking, drain and return to pot. Cover and set aside.

In a large, heavy saute pan or medium pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the chorizo and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes (If using prosciutto, remove and set aside).

Add the onions and cook, stirring, until soft, 3 minutes.

Add the garlic, oregano, salt, and red pepper flakes, and cook, stirring, for 1 minute.

Add the wine and clam juice and cook for 1 minute.

Add the half&half, butter and lemon juice, stir well, and simmer for 1 minute.

Add the clams (and prosciutto), cover, and cook for about 2 minutes.

Add the cooked pasta and toss to coat.

Add the parsley, and toss to coat. Adjust the thickness with reserved pasta cooking water if necessary.

Serve immediately with parmesan to taste.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 11:00 AM | Comments (168)
Post contains 592 words, total size 4 kb.

1 I saw them make the stuffing waffle on Fox. Looks divine.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 10:57 AM (6hrmc)

2 Corgis called.

Posted by: Grover's at November 30, 2014 10:58 AM (9aKQB)

3 Hi. Ate a lot at Thanksgiving. That is all.

Posted by: Lizzy at November 30, 2014 11:01 AM (ABcz/)

4 Funny, I brought up the Stuffing Waffles in the NFL thread earlier today. Great minds. I've never tried them, but they sound yummy. I saw a cooking segment where some guy was making them. And, used them as "sandwich bread."

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:02 AM (IXrOn)

5 Never been a big fan of Tyler's recipes, but have many successes with Emeril's. If you still have any turkey leftover here's a good one from Emeril. Turkey tetrazzini. I'm pulling it out of the oven now. https://tinyurl.com/o6xcov5

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 11:04 AM (6hrmc)

6 Food vid: http://bit.ly/1HPCyLP

Posted by: Niedermeyer's Dead Horse at November 30, 2014 11:05 AM (DmNpO)

7 I've been dealing with major food aversions lately so the thought of any meat makes me queasy. Anyone have any good vegetarian recipes you stole from your dirty hippie family members?

Posted by: Lauren at November 30, 2014 11:05 AM (A8RyB)

8 Turn Your Thanksgiving Leftovers Into Stuffing or Mashed Potato Waffles http://tinyurl.com/qfbyth3 the things people do One thing I notice about America is that we are a "fun" nation. I think it is one of our greatest assets.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:06 AM (IXrOn)

9 Mmmm, stuffing waffles....

Posted by: exdem13 at November 30, 2014 11:07 AM (/mTq0)

10 @4. I saw that too on Fox. I thought I heard him say he added egg, flour and maybe baking soda? I went to the Fox website to find the recipe but no luck. Where the hell do they hide the recipes?

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 11:07 AM (6hrmc)

11 Is there a recipe for the stuffing waffle? Or do you just put leftover stuffing in a waffle iron?

Posted by: Teresa in Fort Worth, TX (@Teresa_Koch) at November 30, 2014 11:08 AM (PZ6/M)

12 If Bretzysdude shows up, go back to the Travel(ish) thread for a suggestion.

If you're on twitter, I'm moxiemom.

Posted by: Y-not at November 30, 2014 11:09 AM (9BRsg)

13 Alright morons, maybe one of you can help me. I love fried calamari, yet I have always failed at making it. I've tried batter for the rings, dipping them in egg wash and flour like chicken, fresh squid, frozen squid, everything I can think of. And in the end, I always wind up with a lumpy mess, a fryer full of loose crumbled breading and mostly naked rings. Is there a secret here I need to know?

Posted by: Weirddave at November 30, 2014 11:09 AM (KAmzK)

14 I love Lig with clam sauce.  My intestines do not.  Always get gas and diarrhea.


It's worth it.

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:10 AM (0FSuD)

15 "Where the hell do they hide the recipes?" Hi!

Posted by: Geraldo's Vault at November 30, 2014 11:10 AM (A8RyB)

16 We made french fries from scratch on Friday afternoon. I was hoping they wouldn't be wonderful, because they were a lot of work (cook at low temp, freeze, cook at high temp). Was using a sauce pan, so had to cook in small batches. They. Were. Wonderful. I made more Friday night! Now I'm looking at deep fryers on Amazon. But I could stop any time. Probably.

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:11 AM (0xTsz)

17 Stuffing waffles, is that British slang for sex?

Posted by: eman at November 30, 2014 11:12 AM (MQEz6)

18 I better never see this sort of reckless use of a waffle iron again!

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at November 30, 2014 11:12 AM (oFCZn)

19 Simpler version: just make regular waffles, then put turkey hash on top of them. Turkey hash is the true spirit of Thanksgiving: chop up some leftover meat, mix with leftover gravy and stuffing, let it cook a little while to meld together, then serve over waffles. I suppose you could serve turkey hash ON stuffing waffles, but that's getting kind of . . . meta.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 30, 2014 11:12 AM (RNKJH)

20 I made stuffing waffles last year. Didn't turn out too well because I tried it with cornbread stuffing made with no flour and it was just too dry.

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:13 AM (0xTsz)

21 Question for the Horde. Is it justifiable homicide if wife throws away last piece of pumpkin pie because it was tempting her? Asking for a friend.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 11:14 AM (6hrmc)

22 Posted by: Weirddave at November 30, 2014 04:09 PM (KAmzK)

Try a light dusting of corn starch.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 30, 2014 11:15 AM (Zu3d9)

23 17 Stuffing waffles, is that British slang for sex?

Posted by: eman at November 30, 2014 04:12 PM (MQEz6)


No I think that's a Greenwich Village slang for sex

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:15 AM (0FSuD)

24 Never been a big fan of Tyler's recipes, but have many successes with Emeril's. If you still have any turkey leftover here's a good one from Emeril. Turkey tetrazzini. I'm pulling it out of the oven now. https://tinyurl.com/o6xcov5 Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 04:04 PM (6hrmc) I always use Emeril's Essence Creole Seasoning for both the initial seasoning of my shrimp, and in his dredge recipe to my my Shrimp Po' Boys. I make extra seasoning and jar it, so I can use it multiple times.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:15 AM (IXrOn)

25 21 Question for the Horde. Is it justifiable homicide if wife throws away last piece of pumpkin pie because it was tempting her? Asking for a friend. Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 04:14 PM (6hrmc) Go for diminished capacity.

Posted by: eman at November 30, 2014 11:16 AM (MQEz6)

26 Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 04:13 PM (0xTsz)

Try 1/2 a whipped egg for each waffle. That worked for me. And stuff the damned iron to the brim, then compress the hell out of it.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at November 30, 2014 11:18 AM (Zu3d9)

27 I've been dealing with major food aversions lately so the thought of any meat makes me queasy. Anyone have any good vegetarian recipes you stole from your dirty hippie family members? Posted by: Lauren at November 30, 2014 04:05 PM (A8RyB) At one point in my youth, I spent a semester at college living in a co-op that was filled to the brim with dirty hippies. (Don't judge me. It made financial sense at the time.) And as part of the living in a co-op filled with dirty hippies thang, I helped make meals. Several of those meals were vegetarian. As far as I can tell, most vegetarian meals simply take a traditional delicious meat-filled recipe- like say lasagna and simply leave out the meat and substitute tofu, lotsa cheese, lentils, beans, and/or occasionally nuts. Making them quite a bit less delicious but meatless. Also, you will fart a lot. A. Lot. And when I say a lot, I mean enough farting to suffocate every man, woman, and child attending a game in the Astrodome. Strangely enough, trannies seem to thrive in an atmosphere of anally expelled gas. But I digress... That's it. Add non-meaty food products to substitute for meat in traditional meat-filled dishes. And you have a vegetarian diet.* *the above was a true(mostly....well somewhat) account from a guy who cooked large portions of vegetarian food against his better judgement for dirty hippies.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 11:21 AM (KBvAm)

28 Costco has more Pumpkin pies for you tomorrow.  Don't be stupid. 

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:21 AM (0FSuD)

29 here the hell do they hide the recipes? they are over at video.foxnews.com ... Here is the one they aired recently for the waffles http://tinyurl.com/mhb4dmd

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:23 AM (IXrOn)

30 Haha, that was a thing of beauty, naturalflake. Unfortunately the thought of beans and tofu sound even more stomach turning than chicken. I think I need 8000 ways to cook rice. You can survive on nothing but rice and cranberry juice, right?

Posted by: Geraldo's Vault at November 30, 2014 11:24 AM (A8RyB)

31 Emeril's recipe for New Orleans BBQ Shrimp is delish. Be sure to have plenty of good french bread to sop up the buttery sauce. Jamie Oliver is a good chef for quick meals. I haven't made a bad meal using his recipes. Of course, when he went on his health food kick, I ignored those recipes. YMMV.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 11:25 AM (KBvAm)

32 I make extra seasoning and jar it, so I can use it multiple times. Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 04:15 PM Same here. Made a big batch of Essence today. I doubled the Essence for the turkey tetrazzini. Had to kick it up a notch.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 11:27 AM (6hrmc)

33 Off sock!

Posted by: Lauren at November 30, 2014 11:27 AM (A8RyB)

34 Haha, that was a thing of beauty, naturalflake.



Sounds sort of like my grad school days with four other grad students.



We mostly smoked dope, played hearts and drank beer.



Dinner?   Pizza delivery. 

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:28 AM (0FSuD)

35 I've been dealing with major food aversions lately so the thought of any meat makes me queasy. Anyone have any good vegetarian recipes you stole from your dirty hippie family members? Posted by: Lauren at November 30, 2014 04:05 PM (A8RyB) hehe We eat many meals that do not contain meat, poultry or fish. You can find them in just about every cookbook, whether is it labeled "vegetarian" or not. It's sad, the "vegetarian" stigma added to meatless cuisine. So many meatless dishes are fantastic, equal in comparison to any other meal, if you're in the mood for it. I get like that, I just feeling like eating either lighter, or just less meat sometimes.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:29 AM (IXrOn)

36 uestion for the Horde. Is it justifiable homicide if wife throws away last piece of pumpkin pie because it was tempting her? Asking for a friend. Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 04:14 PM (6hrmc) I've done that. I ask my husband first, though. Sometimes I just "see calories" and ditch it.

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:31 AM (IXrOn)

37 Question for the Horde. Is it justifiable homicide if wife throws away last piece of pumpkin pie because it was tempting her? Asking for a friend. Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 04:14 PM (6hr although if it is something you can freeze, I do that before tossing out of sight, out of mind

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:31 AM (IXrOn)

38 Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 04:21 PM (KBvAm) Berkeley? If so, which one?

Posted by: CBD at November 30, 2014 11:33 AM (Zu3d9)

39 Posted by: Geraldo's Vault at November 30, 2014 04:24 PM (A8RyB) Thanks. I'm not sure how helpful this will be but- if you eat both sunflower seeds along with peanuts then you are supposed to get all of the amino acids you need to survive. Not the vitamins. Just the amino acids. in my starving student years, i often got along on peanut butter/sunflower seed and honey sammiches.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 11:33 AM (KBvAm)

40 We made french fries from scratch on Friday afternoon. I was hoping they wouldn't be wonderful, because they were a lot of work (cook at low temp, freeze, cook at high temp). Was using a sauce pan, so had to cook in small batches. They. Were. Wonderful. I made more Friday night! Now I'm looking at deep fryers on Amazon. But I could stop any time. Probably. Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 04:11 PM (0xTsz) What kind of potatoes did you use?

Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 11:33 AM (IXrOn)

41 And it tasted every bit as good as it looked. Thanks for the shout-out, CBD!

Posted by: speedster1 at November 30, 2014 11:36 AM (C0wzD)

42 Made a big batch of Essence today. I deny women my essence.

Posted by: Jack Ripper [/i] at November 30, 2014 11:36 AM (zxQ4h)

43 I've done that. I ask my husband first, though. Sometimes I just "see calories" and ditch it. Posted by: artisanal 'ette at November 30, 2014 04:31 PM That's reasonable. However, I wasn't around so she asks daughter. Daughter tells her not to and save it for dad. Got pitched anyway. Grrrrrr.... And Nip Sip, Costco pies are Ok but not the same as homemade IMHO.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 11:37 AM (6hrmc)

44 I can hear the music and smell the Teflon burning!

Posted by: MoJoTee at November 30, 2014 11:38 AM (aR8Ih)

45 The key to good fries?  Soak them in water to remove the starch, clean twice and then blanch them.


Let them sit, then flash fry them.


The old McD recipe.  Use lard for that extra kick. 

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:38 AM (0FSuD)

46 Russets. Don't know if there's a better kind for fries, but that's what I had handy.

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:38 AM (0xTsz)

47 CBD, No, not Berserkly. Austin.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 11:38 AM (KBvAm)

48 Oh, yeh, step one was soaking them. Forgot that. Didn't rinse or anything else. We used peanut oil. I can't seem to find lard in the stores.

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:39 AM (0xTsz)

49 Wait did you live in the weird hippie coop on the drag?

Posted by: Lauren at November 30, 2014 11:40 AM (A8RyB)

50 @45

Oh, I forgot to mention, soaking them AFTER you have cut them up.  Rise out starch, and repeat.

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:40 AM (0FSuD)

51 I'm hungry. I wonder where all this good food is being prepared? I wonder?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 11:42 AM (nzKvP)

52 Peanut oil is GREAT and light.  Lard is nice and rich.    Salt them while they are still hot.

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:42 AM (0FSuD)

53 Here's the video my son watched and we followed. http://youtu.be/8isXLcVRi68 We got a fairly cheap cutter from Amazon, which worked great, but got bits of potato stuck in a hard to reach spot and so took some effort to clean.

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:43 AM (0xTsz)

54 I used to love chicken, broccoli & ziti. Now I order it w/o chicken. I don't like chicken anymore. I will eat it once in a great while. Lizzy, Try something like that, leave out chicken & double up on broccoli.

Posted by: Carol at November 30, 2014 11:45 AM (sj3Ax)

55 Lard?   Order it today!



http://tinyurl.com/lhc6gcz

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:45 AM (0FSuD)

56 This year made turkey by basting it in a bottle of bourbon. Soaked cheesecloth in mixture of bourbon, stock, and margarine. Covered turkey and added the bourbon, stock, and margarine by basting (going through an entire bottle of bourbon). It came out nice an juicy... even the white meat.

Posted by: The Broubon Hat at November 30, 2014 11:45 AM (lN8KC)

57 Wait did you live in the weird hippie coop on the drag? Posted by: Lauren at November 30, 2014 04:40 PM (A8RyB) No, the weird hippie co-op a couple of streets west of the Drag.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 11:45 AM (KBvAm)

58 Any deep fryer recommendations or thoughts? Was just cooking at something small and cheap like this, but I could have my arm twisted to put something nicer on my wish list! http://amzn.com/B005FYF7XQ

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:46 AM (0xTsz)

59
Review: Krusteaz Meyer Lemon Pound Cake Mix

http://tinyurl.com/lnvqw4t

Oh my this is good.  I've tried Krusteaz muffin mixes in the past and never cared for them, but this product is a win.

Use butter as directed and you end up with a loaf of moist pound cake with a great lemon flavor in the cake and glaze.  Even better the next day.

Takes perhaps 3 hours to mix, bake, cool completly, glaze and rest so the glaze hardens. So allow for the extra time.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 30, 2014 11:46 AM (kdS6q)

60 What ValJar dreams of telling Gaylord Merkin Focker every day, "Oh get stuffed in your waffles."

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at November 30, 2014 11:47 AM (wU90H)

61 McD's used beef lard, first link is to pork.  Here is some beef.



http://tinyurl.com/m36poqs

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:49 AM (0FSuD)

62 Oh, yea, the turkey. Thursday seems so long ago. Mixed sage and a bit of maple syrup into softened butter and stuffed that inside and under the skin of da bird, then put bacon slices all over it. Very very good and juicy. Maybe part of that was the kind of turkey...I don't remember what the brand was..."the brand Sam's had when I was there and tired and didn't want to have to go to yet another store so I'm taking this 15 pound turkey for 4 people".

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:49 AM (0xTsz)

63 56 This year made turkey by basting it in a bottle of bourbon.

Soaked cheesecloth in mixture of bourbon, stock, and margarine. Covered turkey and added the bourbon, stock, and margarine by basting (going through an entire bottle of bourbon).

It came out nice an juicy... even the white meat.

Posted by: The Broubon Hat at November 30, 2014 04:45 PM (lN8KC)


Great idea.  Instead of margarine, use Duke's mayonnaise.  It sticks to the turkey, requires no basting.


The booze might cut the mayonnaise so you might need to bast it. 

Posted by: Nip Sip at November 30, 2014 11:50 AM (0FSuD)

64 Throwing out pumpkin pie is grounds for divorce in my book. I asked this on an ONT a few nights back & got a couple answers, but have been waiting for the food thread: I recently acquired four really old cast iron skillet. They're in surprising good shape, but have been in a box in a garage for at least thirty years. What's the best way to season them? I'm in the process of wire-brushing them now, in fact. Too much contradictory advice on the interwebs, and I trust the horde more than any random website. I think, heat them, apply Crisco liberally, then bake for x minutes at x degrees. thoughts?

Posted by: shredded chi at November 30, 2014 11:51 AM (6chcw)

65 >>Here is some beef. Love this review: >>have made tallow balm as a skin moisturizer and I must say I do love it! Adding a few drops essential oil seems to negate the smell enough but I actually don't mind the "natural" smell. I will not be suffering dry skin this winter! I also fried eggs with it and they were delicious! I always love a product with versatility! But how is it as a floor wax??

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 11:51 AM (0xTsz)

66 I like Jaime Oliver. His naked Chef series was perhaps the best since the Frugal Gourmet. Like A Taste of History with Walter Steib as well.

Posted by: Kreplach at November 30, 2014 11:53 AM (bKSy7)

67 I'm going downstairs for tenderloin steaks with my older brother. I bought two Wednesday & there was not one drop of fat on either one. I've never had a steak with zero fat. I hope he bought same cuts as I did. Later!

Posted by: Carol at November 30, 2014 11:55 AM (sj3Ax)

68 @shredded chi,

Cook's Illustrated says to get the cast iron skillet/cookware screaming hot and then pour some oil into the skillet and swirl it all around the interior of the skillet/cookware with paper towels, repeat. 

I tried to the method you mentioned once, not great results.

Posted by: Penfold at November 30, 2014 11:55 AM (LT7gV)

69 I've been dealing with major food aversions lately so the thought of any meat makes me queasy. Anyone have any good vegetarian recipes you stole from your dirty hippie family members? Posted by: Lauren at November 30, 2014 04:05 PM My son sent me a link (that I can't find) to 25 Jewish recipes Gentiles should know. We tried Shakshuka. Pretty much a skillet dish with onions, bell peppers, diced tomatoes, and eggs that would be good for any meal. https://tinyurl.com/pp3la33

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 11:56 AM (6hrmc)

70 Figures. The Moron's turkey was bound like a truncheoned hobo.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid at November 30, 2014 12:01 PM (uSAVP)

71 I used my cast iron as a deep fryer a couple of times before I put it into regular cooking use. Seems to season it just fine.

Posted by: Anderson Cooper's Smoked Sausages at November 30, 2014 12:01 PM (MbqmP)

72 the Frugal Gourmet I like his books a lot. Easy, tasty recipes. Esp. the Drunken Chicken with scallions. Yum. Didn't he lose his show cuz he molested his male assistants? It was something odd like that cuz I believe he was supposed to be a married minister. Or have I got things mixed up? Anywho, good cook books to find at your used book store- though they may stink of perverted fail.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 12:02 PM (KBvAm)

73 58 Any deep fryer recommendations or thoughts? My BIL got one similar to this at Aldi's for 19.99. However, I think it's worth spending the extra bucks so you get a spigot or hose for draining the grease. I have a DeLonghi and love it for clean up.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 12:05 PM (6hrmc)

74 Speaking of food, this should be juicy: http://www.indybay.org/newsitems/2014/11/19/18764337.php "At Direct Action Everywhere, we have one -- and only one -- mission: to take nonviolent direct action until every animal is safe, happy, and free. On the weekend of December 7, 2014, activists across the world will head to places where animal bodies are being mutilated, sold, and consumed and put that mission into action. This will be our biggest and most important day of action yet! For the first phase, we thought we'd memorialize the first action of DxE, as well as visually showcase the intense confinement of even so-called free-range farms, in a provocative action. The main prop you will need is an animal pen, which you can buy from Amazon here (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000H904WI/). We'll put up a rehearsal video, however, next week. Here is a rough script. --- GUERILLA POEM - ANIMAL PEN Activists secretly enter a place of violence. Activists suddenly step forward one-by-one, in front of the space where animal bodies lie, and deliver a poem. "In darkness, they cried. In torment, they died. Now bloodied, their bodies lie. But together we fight. To ensure that their light. Is honored, as was their right." Together, they then say: "It's not food. It's violence!" The remaining activists then set up two pens on each side of the demonstration to represent the intense confinement in even so-called humane farms. Activists will enclose themselves within the pen very tightly, shoulder to shoulder, so that there is no room to move at all. They will hold banners or signs with animal images (to be sent shortly) while other activists gather around them with signs that say "It's not Food. It's Violence." and "Until Every Animal is Free." A number of activists will speak from within the pens. "She was placed in a cage of flesh." "She never stepped outside, or saw the sky." "She was destined to die." "She is the face of humane farming." "And she is now safe and happy." "We will fight for her until every animal is free." One activist delivers a short speakout. Then suddenly, everyone vanishes. (Alternatively, march out of the store.) " These are the same people who lectured diners at SF restaurants that they were murdering animals by eating meat.

Posted by: zombie at November 30, 2014 12:08 PM (K4YiS)

75
I like Jaime Oliver. His naked Chef series was perhaps the best since the Frugal Gourmet.
Posted by: Kreplach



Oliver is actually a bit of a git.  He's the UK's Michellle Obama, working with the government to force kids to eat sawdust and kale. And he throws handfuls of chili and mustard into everything. Not to my taste.

But the first season of Naked Chef was fun, in a Top Gear BBC over produced sort of way. And the episode "Hen Party" was one of the sexiest things you'd see on Food Network. Jamie cools a late meal for his gf and her hot friends.  Cued up to the good bits.  At about 11:40:

http://youtu.be/g-au_FWVfgk?t=11m40s

I mean, that's a Penthouse Letter just waiting to happen.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at November 30, 2014 12:08 PM (kdS6q)

76 I want to share to anyone out there what we did this Thanksgiving to our turkey. (No it was not x rated, we are getting too old for those thoughts) First let me state that we have deep fat fried, Green Egg BBQed, smoked, traditionally roasted our turkeys. There are not too many things I have not tried with a turkey in terms of cooking, including bacon. However, this year we spatchcocked our turkey, and cooked a fourteen pound bird in little over an hour. It came out beautifully moist and the skin was browned to perfection. If you catch this little comment in this long thread, I highly highly recommended learning how to spatchcock fowl - it is amazing how well that turkey cooked. Happy Thanksgiving remains.

Posted by: SATrose at November 30, 2014 12:09 PM (nycWw)

77 >>However, I think it's worth spending the extra bucks so you get a spigot or hose for draining the grease. Ah, that would be useful. Thank you!

Posted by: Mama AJ at November 30, 2014 12:11 PM (0xTsz)

78 I think, heat them, apply Crisco liberally, then bake for x minutes at x degrees. thoughts? Posted by: shredded chi at November 30, 2014 04:51 PM I wiped my down with vegetable oil using paper towels then baked in oven. I never use soap cleaning it and oil down after every other use. Lodge Cast Iron has been around for ages. Here's their use and care link. https://tinyurl.com/ne3nubo

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 12:14 PM (6hrmc)

79 I wiped my down with vegetable oil using paper towels then baked in oven. No! Vegetable turns to glue! Use lard or shortening!

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid at November 30, 2014 12:17 PM (uSAVP)

80 >>These are the same people who lectured diners at SF restaurants that they were murdering animals by eating meat.

The world has gone made, huh?
Why must everyone be a little activist, running around telling other people how to think, act, live? Just don't eat meat and leave the rest of us alone.

Posted by: Lizzy at November 30, 2014 12:20 PM (ABcz/)

81 I'm sick of turkey. Always happens on Sunday after Thanksgiving. That in mind, beef stew is on the menu tonight. Nothing special about mine except I cook in the oven in a dutch oven. The meat is coated in spiced flour (I also use Emeril's Essence purchased as Sams Club, 21oz containers) then browned in olive oil. Add 6 cups beef stock, 2 Tbs Worcestershire sauce. Put in a 285 degree oven for 2 1/2 hrs. Add carrots, onions, celery, turnips, and potatoes and return to oven for about 2 more hours. If the juice is too thick, thin w dry red wine. Too thin, use the spiced flour to thicken. Enjoy.

Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking the wind at November 30, 2014 12:22 PM (hI9z9)

82 First let me state that we have deep fat fried, Green Egg BBQed, smoked, traditionally roasted our turkeys. We do all 3 of these methods every Thanksgiving. This year the Green Egg bird won for best. (Stuffed and injected with jalapenos.) Have not tried the spatchcocked turkey. Just read about this method recently. Now you have piqued my curiosity. May try it Christmas.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 12:23 PM (6hrmc)

83 Howdy y'all, back from tending the livestock.




One of these days I'll get around to seasoning the pile of cast iron cookware that I've either inherited or otherwise acquired.  I've got three skillets and a Dutch oven that I keep in shape, since I use them regularly.

Posted by: Country Singer at November 30, 2014 12:24 PM (nL0sw)

84 To get away from the turkey, I made- Chinese Braised Pork Belly last night. Good Lord is that delicious and, best of all, stupidly simple to make. It became a family favorite the first time I made it. Too bad it so-o-o-o-o rich though, I could eat it once a week.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 30, 2014 12:26 PM (KBvAm)

85 These are the same people who lectured diners at SF restaurants that they were murdering animals by eating meat.

I've got a poem for them.

Meat's not murder
If that were true
I'd be having
Brisket of you

Posted by: Blanco Basura at November 30, 2014 12:26 PM (UVfht)

86 Watching GB play NE. So after watching the Jets and Giants, THIS is what 2 real NFL teams look like? Who knew?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 12:27 PM (nzKvP)

87 >>>No! Vegetable turns to glue! Use lard or shortening!<<<

I used vegetable oil, one time, to temper a homemade knife after a salt brine quench.  It's like dipping and curing in polyurethane and actually worked out quite well, although I'd probably never do it again.

Posted by: Fritz at November 30, 2014 12:29 PM (dVmLD)

88 Batter and deep fry those  waffles and you just may have somthing there!

Posted by: Count de Monet, Person of Pallor at November 30, 2014 12:31 PM (JO9+V)

89 No! Vegetable turns to glue! Use lard or shortening! Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid at November 30, 2014 05:17 PM Beg to differ. I done it twice now and both skillets came out fine. Lodge Cast Iron recommends vegetable oil. https://tinyurl.com/ne3nubo

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 12:34 PM (6hrmc)

90 Answer quick. What's the first thing you thought of when you saw that waffle in the main post? Answer: The 1971 linoleum in my basement. Serious. I expect that waffle tastes better. And probably not made of asphalt and asbestos.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at November 30, 2014 12:35 PM (4Mv1T)

91 I = I've

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 12:36 PM (6hrmc)

92 86 Watching GB play NE. So after watching the Jets and Giants, THIS is what 2 real NFL teams look like? Who knew? Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 05:27 PM (nzKvP) Little Winger is in Green Bay at the game. I don't know how he got tickets. He told me not to ask any questions.

Posted by: grammie winger at November 30, 2014 12:40 PM (3B+O8)

93 I've seasoned cast iron with oil and with Crisco. I prefer Crisco, but have hade good luck with both. My wife never had any experience with cast. Always wants to soak the pots and pans in hot soapy water. I love the girl, but sometimes she tests my patience.

Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking the wind at November 30, 2014 12:42 PM (hI9z9)

94 That's just..., not natural.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 12:44 PM (vPh3W)

95 ...I love the girl, but sometimes she tests my patience. Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking --------------------------- If she didn't test your patience, she wouldn't be a member of the opposite sex. And yes ladies, I know. It cuts both ways. Venus, meet Mars. Mars, Venus.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at November 30, 2014 12:45 PM (4Mv1T)

96 My wife never had any experience with cast. Always wants to soak the pots and pans in hot soapy water. I love the girl, but sometimes she tests my patience. Posted by: fairweatherbill ---------------- I had to (still have to) remind Mrs. Hammer to *dry* carbon steel knife blades after washing.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 12:45 PM (vPh3W)

97 ...an wussup hammer. Acquire a VP9 yet? You've had the entire afternoon, you know.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at November 30, 2014 12:46 PM (4Mv1T)

98 I had to (still have to) remind Mrs. Hammer to *dry* carbon steel knife blades after washing. Posted by: Mike Hammer ------------ P.S - Only do this after you have possession of said knife.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 12:46 PM (vPh3W)

99 I love the girl, but sometimes she tests my patience. Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking the wind at November 30, 2014 Noted. But does she pitch the last piece of pumpkin pie? (see @21 )

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 12:49 PM (6hrmc)

100 Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 05:34 PM (6hrmc) My 60-piece set of cast irons beg to differ. IF ( as in 'IF') you then store that vegetable-oil-coated cast for any length of time, it WILL gum up into a mess that will be difficult by factors unimagined to remove. Don't get in the habit of using vegetable oil on cast iron. Ye be warned!

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 12:49 PM (uSAVP)

101 The formation of rust should clue her in, but no not this redhead. I took over the task of washing the cast myself. This is a very special set of cookware. My grandfather gave it to my mom when she got married. 65 years old in June.

Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking the wind at November 30, 2014 12:50 PM (hI9z9)

102 Never get out of the car. Run them over if you have to. Jim Hoft @gatewaypundit 20m Florida Driver Beaten to Death With Hammers in St. Louis -- Two Teens Arrested http://shar.es/1XQjTI via @gatewaypundit Police say 32-year-old Zemir Begic of Miami suffered injuries to his head, abdomen, face and mouth in the attack. He was pronounced dead at a hospital. Authorities say Begic was in his car about 1:15 a.m. Sunday when several young people approached and began damaging it. When Begic got out, he was attacked with at least two hammers.

Posted by: Costanza Defense at November 30, 2014 12:51 PM (zwdxl)

103 TR - I think I'll go loose a few rounds and see how it feels. I have hefted one, and it felt..., natural. That does mean an awful lot, but it's something. One potential advantage of the HK is that it has different side panels as well as backstrap available. Small thing, but there it is. At any rate, the price IS high. Worth spending a few bucks with a renter to see how it feels. Deep down inside, I'm still interested in a Steyr. Did I ever mention that I was dropped on my head as a child?

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 12:51 PM (vPh3W)

104 Lodge Cast Iron recommends vegetable oil. Lodge is in the business of selling skillets!

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 12:52 PM (uSAVP)

105 Noted. But does she pitch the last piece of pumpkin pie? (see @21 ) Posted by: olddog No, that would be a war. She made the pie and it was terrific. I fed the last piece to my skinny 14 yr old daughter at lunch today. That kid can burn more calories in her sleep than average people do by working all day.

Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking the wind at November 30, 2014 12:55 PM (hI9z9)

106 Lodge is in the business of selling skillets! Posted by: Cicero Kaboom --------------- True..., and I also own ConAgra shares.

Posted by: Anonymous Lodge VIP at November 30, 2014 12:56 PM (vPh3W)

107 @83 I became a specialist, for a while, in resurrecting nested sets of ironware that my blessed late FIL had picked up for pennies at various roadside sales. Cola does do some good; CLR-type formulas and naval jelly also have their place.

It's amazing how far gone they can appear to be, and still be brought back. I do have a couple that should be tole-painted wall hangings, not because they cracked or anything, but had been used the way they were designed -- on iron stoves with coal or wood in them, filling a hole in the top where a filler plate had been moved aside. They pick up a certain shape, not quite warped, but a bow that doesn't let cooking oil lay evenly in the bottom. I can still cook in them, though, if only to prove the point. I'm rich in iron. My ancestors would be envious.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 30, 2014 12:56 PM (LDGeY)

108 Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 05:49 PM Ah. I really don't store my cast iron skillets for any length of time. I use them pretty regularly. After my initial seasoning of the skillet I only gently wipe inside of skillets with veggy oil. Working for me now. However, I see your point if storing long time.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 12:59 PM (6hrmc)

109 It's amazing how far gone they can appear to be, and still be brought back...Stringer Davis Any comments on sandblasting cast iron?

Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking the wind at November 30, 2014 01:00 PM (hI9z9)

110 Any comments on sandblasting cast iron? I think that would leave them too rough. Maybe soda blast them.

Posted by: Ronster at November 30, 2014 01:02 PM (9vrWU)

111 I find bees wax to be the best cast iron protector. I started doing that when camping. If dust gets into the crisco you have to wash it out. The bees wax rinses clean quickly. Never use soap, just hot water and dry over fire or on stove

Posted by: lurking grandma at November 30, 2014 01:03 PM (2VaQu)

112 Waffle iron works great with shredded potatoes and bacon to make a waffle hash brown. You need an egg for binder and make sure the bacon is on the lean side (otherwise too greasy).

Posted by: Evil Blogger Lady at November 30, 2014 01:07 PM (UYjru)

113 I found a bean pot in disgraceful condition, and got a buddy with a car shop to do it up in an enclosed sandblaster. It did fine, but that pot had been left to rust when it was still pretty new. I think a skillet with a hundred years use on it might have gotten blasted a little thin. And then, over-cautious, I did a bunch more cleaning because I suspected little sharps might be stuck in the iron pores.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 30, 2014 01:07 PM (LDGeY)

114 Don't get in the habit of using vegetable oil on cast iron. Ye be warned!

I have and it's a gummy mess the next time I use it. What do you use?

Posted by: dartist at November 30, 2014 01:08 PM (ahBY0)

115 Thanks, grandma! That's an interesting idea, and I'll try it next time I re-season.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 30, 2014 01:09 PM (LDGeY)

116 rather than sandblasting, use nut shells. I always save walnut and pecan shells, crush them and use that instead of sand. Makes less of a mess of cast.

Posted by: WingNut at November 30, 2014 01:10 PM (A4AYO)

117 Lodge is in the business of selling skillets! Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 05:52 PM So your point is that Lodge, a 100 year old company, wants customers to fcuk up their cast-iron skillets and by more of their product. Got it. Regardless, I have 3 generations of their cookware in my kitchen and it's working for me.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 01:11 PM (6hrmc)

118 Costanza Defense, Those kids better be tried as adults!

Posted by: Carol at November 30, 2014 01:12 PM (sj3Ax)

119 Lauren:

Try rice and beans or letils and beans.  Soak the beans two days to try to get the beans to start converting some of those extra long sugars that give you gas.  
There is Nahut and rice, which is chickpeas cooked with rice and honey (I use molasses)
The rice and legume makes a mostly complete protein and if you start craving meat or fish or something go eat some.
I am told that Kale has more protein than beans and rice but I think that is absolutely false.

My old treat was a couple slices of tofu with thinly chopped green onions and soy sauce, and rice with sesame oil and a dash of kosher salt drizzled on it.  Mmmm.  
Outside of that, try the old standards like squash and peanut and ginger soup or corn fritters, lots of salads, mashing potatoes and turnips, roasting squash with mozzarella, try roasting turnips...
Baked bananas, spinach tossed or cooked with vinegar,
Various iterations of miso...Kimchee....
And of course bread, I could just about live on bread.
I'd be spherical in no time, but I'd be alive!

Posted by: kindltot at November 30, 2014 01:13 PM (t//F+)

120 Costanza Defense, Did you read what St Louis school plans to teach about the gentle giant? It's at Gateway Pundit.

Posted by: Carol at November 30, 2014 01:15 PM (sj3Ax)

121 I'm gearing up for chicken fried steaks tomorrow with my great aunt's #12 Griswald. Load that puppy up with food and you need 2 men and a boy to lift it but I really like it. Maybe I'll try lard to season it after I clean it this time.

Posted by: dartist at November 30, 2014 01:17 PM (ahBY0)

122 OT-- I want to write again, and just downloaded YWrite 5, but none of my Terran Empire characters seem to want to talk to me. Would it be OK to fanfic my Skyrim gang?

Posted by: Empire1 at November 30, 2014 01:20 PM (wyeiy)

123 I have and it's a gummy mess the next time I use it. What do you use? Posted by: dartist at November 30, 2014 06:08 PM (ahBY0 Any any fats work great. Crisco is fine. Vegetable is not as good. Corn oil will just ruin a good skillet.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 01:20 PM (uSAVP)

124 uggh. Any Animal fats work.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 01:20 PM (uSAVP)

125 head to places where animal bodies are being mutilated, sold, and consumed and

argue about whether the sauce should be sweet, or vinegar, or have tomato, yadda yadda yadda.

Posted by: HR boozin' up the eggnog at November 30, 2014 01:21 PM (ImIut)

126 123...I got it, thanks. The wax idea sounds interesting too but I'm not so sure I want to eat it. Maybe I'm missing something.

Posted by: dartist at November 30, 2014 01:23 PM (ahBY0)

127 * grits teeth * * don't be an asshole! * * get off your pedantic high-horse *

Posted by: Anonymous Lodge VIP at November 30, 2014 01:24 PM (vPh3W)

128 / Lodge sock

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 01:24 PM (vPh3W)

129 I'm going to do an unAmerican thing, and complain about Lodge. I've been spoiled by the products of the late firms of Piqua Ohio, which were either smooth like baby's butt when new, or nicely rounded off by the generations of cooks who preceded me. But new Lodge, even the pre-seasoned ones, are rough as a cob.

I haven't been able to track a new one long enough to figure out if they smooth out with use. It just doesn't feel right to me. I like the company, but that's my bitch.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at November 30, 2014 01:25 PM (LDGeY)

130 uggh. Any Animal fats work. ------------ True. The possible bonus/downside is that if you sautee shrimp in the pan that you use for bacon..., you get bacon-flavored shrimp.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 01:26 PM (vPh3W)

131 When I lived in an apartment I found a wok that was being used to catch water from a leaky roof. I scrubbed it out with steel wool and still have it today.

Posted by: rickl at November 30, 2014 01:26 PM (sdi6R)

132 if you sautee shrimp in the pan that you use for bacon..., you get bacon-flavored shrimp. Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 06:26 PM (vPh3W) Sounds like a plan to me

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 01:27 PM (nzKvP)

133 The best way to season cast iron pans is to use bacon.

Buy a couple of pounds and fry it as hot as you can stand up over a couple of days.  Wipe it out and scrape up any crusty-crunchies the sugar cure leaves behind, wipe again and allow to air-cool. Next time heat it until it either spits when you flick water on it or it starts smoking.
Remembert to get a flat nosed steel spatula for your cast iron, it scrapes the best.

Get bacon grease on the sides by using bamboo chopsticks to grab a wad of bacon and use it to swab down the inside.
Pour off the grease, wipe down and chip out the crunchies and wipe and cool again
you can also put it in the oven at about 120 or 160 and let it bake for a while after you grease it.

And even better, you just pour lard out.  You can eat the bacon.

Posted by: kindltot at November 30, 2014 01:27 PM (t//F+)

134 you get bacon-flavored shrimp. Posted by: Mike Hammer Bonus!

Posted by: fairweatherbill bucking the wind at November 30, 2014 01:28 PM (hI9z9)

135 http://www.griswoldcookware.com/cleaning_%26_care.htm

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 01:29 PM (uSAVP)

136 After about $180,000 to put 2 kids thru college and grad school I finally got a bang for my buck today. One of my daughters put together a Powerpoint Presentation for me. What a bargain.

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 01:29 PM (nzKvP)

137 Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 06:29 PM (nzKvP) ********* That's an expensive presentation.

Posted by: Truck Monkey, as Voiced by Brian Dennehy at November 30, 2014 01:32 PM (jucos)

138 Crumpled-up aluminum foil is a good, cheap cleaner for cast iron or steel pans.

Posted by: eman at November 30, 2014 01:32 PM (MQEz6)

139 http://www.griswoldcookware.com/cleaning_%26_care.htm ------------------- Aha! And, see..., I managed to stop myself from blurting out, "Griswold! Not Griswald" ..., but now I have.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 01:32 PM (vPh3W)

140 The best way to season cast iron pans is to use bacon.

In the back of my mind I knew all along it had to be bacon, dammit. That magic stuff will cure anything but the arteries around my heart.

Posted by: dartist at November 30, 2014 01:33 PM (ahBY0)

141 How to clean and season cast iron is one of those things like arguing biscuit recipes and cross-bows v longbows, with the exception that no-one expects a serious change in other peoples' biscuit recipes, and the bow thing is mostly to just argue.  Cast iron arguments, on the other hand, are like explaining Arianism to Emperor Justinian.

Posted by: kindltot at November 30, 2014 01:33 PM (t//F+)

142 One of my daughters put together a Powerpoint Presentation for me. What a bargain. Posted by: Nevergiveup ------------- A picture is worth a thousand words. That's all I got.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 01:34 PM (vPh3W)

143 "No! Vegetable turns to glue! Use lard or shortening!

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid"



Seasoning cast iron?


No better way, I got this from cooks illustrated and trust me there is nothing better.


Clean the piece first, you can burn off the residue with an outdoor grill, get as hot as you can, you can even put it into the glowing coals.  Be careful to bring it up to heat slowly however or it will crack.  You can also use oven cleaner if you want to - don't worry about chemicals as any reaming cleaner will be removed later.


However you do it, get the thing down to bare iron.


Put in oven and turn to 200 and allow it to come up to this temp to open up the pores of the iron.   The take it out and apply a thin coat of flaxseed oil, thin and even is good, drippy and thick bad.


Place back in oven and turn as high as it goes, 550 normally.  Allow 2 hours and then turn oven off.  Allow two more hours to cool.


Repeat this five times.   When you get five coats of this on the seasoning will be like glass and will be the best nonstick you ever saw.


I do all of my cast iron this way.


Try it, you'll thank me later.


Posted by: Mrs. Ida Lowry at November 30, 2014 01:35 PM (8N+Kq)

144 That's an expensive presentation. Posted by: Truck Monkey, as Voiced by Brian Dennehy at November 30, 2014 06:32 PM (judos) Yeah but I was as happy as a kid in candy store. I'm easily satisfied. Maybe I can bill the Navy?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 01:35 PM (nzKvP)

145 All im sayin' is that I left corn oil in a skillet one time and it sat in the back of the cupboard for a spell...I ended up just putting it into a campfire and burn that crud out and re-seasoned it. Cast iron has been around long before vegetable oil. I just assume go with what grandma used to keep her pans shining.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 01:37 PM (uSAVP)

146 Cast iron has been around long before vegetable oil. I just assume go with what grandma used to keep her pans shining. Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 06:37 PM (uSAVP) Maybe that is what kardashian used on her ass?

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 01:37 PM (nzKvP)

147 Um, I spent the afternoon with a gentleman of 84 years who was telling me about saturated fats.  He quotes the Framingham Heart study, showing an inverse relationship between intake of saturated fats and heart disease.
Sounds insane to me, but he is probably in better health than I am.

Posted by: kindltot at November 30, 2014 01:40 PM (t//F+)

148 Maybe that is what kardashian used on her ass? I assumed her husband buffed and shined with McGuiers car wax.

Posted by: Ronster at November 30, 2014 01:41 PM (9vrWU)

149 Aha! And, see..., I managed to stop myself from blurting out, "Griswold! Not Griswald"

wold, wald...What difference at this point does it make?

Posted by: Grandma Cankles at November 30, 2014 01:41 PM (ahBY0)

150 GB NE is a pretty good football game. Not the same game the Jets play that is for sure

Posted by: Nevergiveup at November 30, 2014 01:44 PM (nzKvP)

151 148 Maybe that is what kardashian used on her ass? She did NOT use shortening on her ass!

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid. Griswald went on Vacation, and made a hell of a skillet. at November 30, 2014 01:45 PM (uSAVP)

152 "GB NE is a pretty good football game."

Watching.  Just started the 4th.  Drawn out game. 

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 30, 2014 01:45 PM (KRltM)

153 I just saw the Crying NFL'ers commercial. Pathetic. This might be the last year I submit to watching this product. Goodell and company have ruined a once fine product. College Football is more than a fair alternative.

Posted by: Truck Monkey, as Voiced by Brian Dennehy at November 30, 2014 01:48 PM (jucos)

154 WTH. Thermometer hit 70 today outside. Wife turned on A/C. Lows of 28 and snow and ice in forecast tomorrow. Must go check beer supply, stat.

Posted by: olddog in mo at November 30, 2014 01:50 PM (6hrmc)

155 New thread.


Some sort of pointy-headed stuff. 

Posted by: Ricardo Kill at November 30, 2014 01:50 PM (KRltM)

156 Question for the cooking horde. My grandmother (Texas) made incredible caramel pies. There are recipes but not her recipe as it was not written down. None of the other women in the family can duplicate the pies due to inability to get them to set up. That is, they come out like runny goop, while hers when cut would be solid more like pumpkin pie. Any ideas?

Posted by: Meremortal at November 30, 2014 01:50 PM (1Y+hH)

157 "GB NE is a pretty good football game."

I'm going with GB because they are the Bears most hated rival. The Bears suck so bad Oakland could have beaten them today.

Posted by: dartist at November 30, 2014 01:52 PM (ahBY0)

158 I think about everyone is gonna by now, but just wanted to say thanks! Great feed back from all. (I've been out back trying to get these things down to bare iron) I think I'll try a couple different methods, then maybe report back next week if anyone is interested. (I got 4 pans from that garage - a #5, #6 & two #8s)

Posted by: shredded chi at November 30, 2014 02:01 PM (VvCsn)

159 Maybe that is what kardashian used on her ass? Posted by: Nevergiveup ---------------- Maybe, but(t) http://tinyurl.com/6wtq9wq

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at November 30, 2014 02:19 PM (l1zOH)

160 Many thanks for the dry brine turkey recipe. I tried it on a Weber grill and it turned out great. The LOML says that I am now in charge of all Thanksgiving turkeys.

Posted by: zoot fenster at November 30, 2014 02:31 PM (cwou9)

161 Stuffing waffles? That's just twisted, sick, & wrong. I gots the waffle iron heating up, 'cause I wanna be wrong, too. This is exactly the kind of twisted siht that I dream up. Well played, CBD

Posted by: AltonJackson at November 30, 2014 02:39 PM (KCxzN)

162 I made stuffing waffles last year, they were meh. I was hoping they would be better for holding gravy and interesting to the youngsters who didn't want to try stuffing but they didn't turn out very well. This year I went as absolutely traditional as possible (not cornbread stuffing, no thanks southerners) and it turned out great. The secret is the bacon grease.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at November 30, 2014 02:58 PM (39g3+)

163 So, I messed around again and missed posting this before  Thanksgiving, but it's a great use of your left over Turkey, or it's a good item all throughout the Holiday Season for your parties. I make this in my restaurant and people absolutely love it. You might ant to try it at home, as it's actually very easy!
Turkey Dressing Cheesecake (Savory)

1/2 Package Dressing (your choice, follow the directions on how to make it) for the crust

1# Deli Turkey
1 Bunch Green Onions
1 Qt Chicken Stock
8 oz. Sour Cream
1# Cream Cheese
2 Eggs
Srihacha to taste
Garlic to taste

Chop up the Turkey and Green Onions ( it doesn't matter how big you chop it, it will go into a Food Processor anyway). Add to a large Saute Pan with the Chicken Stock. Slowly simmer until all stock is absorbed/dissipated.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Make Dressing following package directions. Place Dressing into the bottom of 2 9" Pie Pans (Or use on larger baking Pan) and press out to form the crust.Set aside.
After the Chicken stock is finished reducing, add the mixture in a food Processor with the Sour Cream, Cream Cheese, Srihacha, and Eggs. Pulse until mixed well. Por this mixture into the Pie Pans.
Bake at 350 for about 45 minutes.
Let cool, serve Warm. I serve this with a Red Wine Cranberry reduction (basically I throw some dried cranberries into a stock pot, about 2 cups. cover with water and reconstitue them on a rolling boil. When about half the water is boiled, I add in Red Wine and Sugar, then reduce until it's a thick mixture, like Cranberry Sauce) Or you can simply serve it with Cranberry sauce!

Posted by: chefwes_tx at November 30, 2014 03:22 PM (xTQcZ)

164 "I think I'll try a couple different methods, then maybe report back next week if anyone is interested.
(I got 4 pans from that garage - a #5, #6 & two #8s)

Posted by: shredded chi"



Do try the flaxseed oil method, and I'd love to hear your results.   If there's a better method, I'd love to know it.


Of course there isn't.  :-)


Be careful, don't burn yourself!


Posted by: Mrs. Ida Lowry at November 30, 2014 03:58 PM (8N+Kq)

165 caramel pie Pumpkin pie is a custard. If the texture was like pumpkin pie, it was probably a caramel-flavored custard. Problem is that almost all "caramel custard" recipes are actually flans - plain custard with caramel topping, which it doesn't sound like this was. (Or was it?) Anyway, if it's the same flavor all through, you might want to start with a custard pie recipe, then try, variously, using brown sugar in place of the sugar. Or even caramelized sugar, although that would be tricky since you need to mix it in while it's hot and that might curdle the eggs. Hmm. Anyway, something along those lines might work.

Posted by: jaed at November 30, 2014 08:25 PM (pepNq)

166 Stock from the Thanksgiving turkey carcass http://tinyurl.com/n9vssye

Posted by: bour3 at November 30, 2014 09:57 PM (5x3+2)

167 Onion Ring Batter:

1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 cup cornstarch

2 tablespoons instant mashed potatoes

big pinch of cayenne

1 cup cold club soda

2-3 cups Panko (Japanese-style breadcrumbs), or as needed

fine salt to taste

vegetable oil for frying

2-3 yellow onions, cut into 1/4-inch rings

Weirddave:  The instant mashed potatoes is the SECRET INGREDIENT and may help with your calamari as well.

Sorry I am always late to the food thread!

Posted by: Mongerel at December 01, 2014 01:39 PM (YqWfw)

168 My grandmother (Texas) made incredible caramel pies. There are recipes but not her recipe as it was not written down. None of the other women in the family can duplicate the pies due to inability to get them to set up. That is, they come out like runny goop, while hers when cut would be solid more like pumpkin pie.

Any ideas?

Posted by: Meremortal at November 30, 2014 06:50 PM (1Y+hH)


I had this problem with my pecan pies. Now I toss in a heaping tablespoon of cornstarch, problem solved. Not sure if it would work for a caramel pie as I have never made one of those, but it might be worth an experiment.

Posted by: Mongerel at December 01, 2014 03:45 PM (YqWfw)

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