August 31, 2014

Food Thread: Fire Is Our Friend Edition [CBD]
— Open Blogger

Many thanks to Y-not for covering for me last Sunday!

One of the advantages of knowing an excellent bartender is that occasionally he will let his hair down (that's just an expression...the dude is as bald as a ping-pong ball) and pull out the silly stuff he did in his youth.

fire.jpg
Of course, there was a serious side to this. He toasted a lemon peel in burning Absinthe for an interesting take on a Sazerac.
lemon peel.jpg


"Locavore" is a dirty, stinking, vile word that raises the hackles of any normal person. It is redolent of patchouli oil, stinking hippies, late model Volvos and Priuses (Prii?), and ignorant, illogical analyses of the current state of food production. "Eat Local, Act Global," is the logical extension of this stupidity, and may be even worse.

But some things really are better when purchased locally, and not for the socio-political, masturbatory fantasies of the soft Left.

tomato.jpg

Great tomatoes are rarely to be found anywhere other than your backyard or the local farm stand. They just don't travel well, and when they do, it is at tremendous cost. Those heirloom tomato salads served in February in expensive restaurants are courtesy of our modern air-freight system. Which is why they are $14.50. And even then the tomatoes are not quite as good as what many of us can get a few miles down the road. In August.

So what to do with those great tomatoes? My favorite dish is thick-sliced tomatoes on some lightly toasted bread (good stuff...nice and thick and dense), with a sprinkle of salt and some crumbled goat cheese, all topped with a light drizzle of olive oil.

And that leads to my next "local is better" ingredient: chicken.

My favorite pork ribs are from Iowa. I will happily eat corn-fed beef from the midwest (it's the best in the world), and Colorado raises some rockin' good lamb. But chicken seems to be better from the local farms. That may be a function of the limitations of the transportation combined with the relative fragility of chicken. But the chickens themselves seem different, with plumper legs and thighs and normal-sized breasts, as opposed to the strange looking commercial stuff that obviously is selected for monstrous breasts.

Whatever the reason, I'll take a meal of those tomatoes and a simple roasted local chicken over most foods on earth.


Carne Adovada (New Mexico-style Pork with Red Chilies)

4 whole dried ancho chilies, seeds and stems removed
4 whole dried pasilla chilies, seeds and stems removed
1 quart chicken stock
1/2 cup raisins
1 cup frozen orange juice concentrate
3 whole chipotle chilies canned in adobo
2 tablespoons white vinegar
2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce
3 pounds boneless pork shoulder, trimmed and cut into 2-inch chunks
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 medium onions, thinly sliced (about 2 cups)
6 medium cloves garlic, minced (about 2 teaspoons)
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1 tablespoon ground cumin
3 bay leaves
Kosher salt

Corn tortillas, cilantro, diced onions, lime wedges, and queso fresco for serving (optional)

1. Place dried chilies in a medium saucepan over medium high heat and cook, turning occasionally, until pliable and fragrant, about 1 minute. Add chicken stock, raisins, orange juice concentrate, chipotles in adobo, white vinegar, and fish sauce. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce to a bare simmer, and let cook until chilies are totally softened, about 15 minutes. Blend into a smooth puree using an immersion blender or by transferring to a countertop blender. Set aside.

2. Carefully pat pork dry with paper towels or a clean kitchen towel. Heat vegetable oil in a large heavy-bottomed Dutch oven over high heat until smoking. Add pork all at once and spread evenly over bottom surface (it's ok if not all the pork is touching the bottom or if the pan is crowded. Cook without moving until bottom surface is well browned, about 8 minutes. Transfer pork to a large bowl. Add onions and garlic to Dutch oven and cook, stirring frequently, until onions and garlic are softened and beginning to brown, about 10 minutes. Add oregano and cumin and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 30 seconds.

3. Add chili mixture to Dutch oven and stir to scrape up any browned bits from the bottom. Return pork to Dutch oven. Add bay leaves. Bring to a boil then reduce to a bare simmer. Cover, leaving lid slightly ajar, and cook, stirring occasionally until pork chunks break apart when you apply pressure with a spoon, about 2 hours.

4. Sauce should be thick, with an almost ketchup-like consistency. If too thin, increase heat to a light simmer and cook, stirring frequently, until reduced to the desired consistency. Season to taste with salt.


Posted by: Open Blogger at 11:00 AM | Comments (97)
Post contains 801 words, total size 5 kb.

1 Fire!

Posted by: low information commenter at August 31, 2014 10:59 AM (qnhj2)

2 I love sliced tomatoes. The more acidic the better.

Posted by: Ronster at August 31, 2014 11:04 AM (GmOIG)

3 My response to locavores is "Why do you hate poor farmers in Chile who just want to be able to send their kids to school?"

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at August 31, 2014 11:04 AM (GDulk)

4 FLAMIIING DEATH!!

Posted by: P. T. Flea at August 31, 2014 11:06 AM (mx5oN)

5 The plural of Prius is Prions.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at August 31, 2014 11:07 AM (OCcU9)

6 As far as tomatoes and chickens are concerned, you're absolutely right, local is best. We are in Day Two of BLT Fest here, nom nom nom.

Posted by: sock_rat_eez at August 31, 2014 11:10 AM (OCcU9)

7 Okay.. well food thread.. tomatoes are food. I am growing a tomato plant and I got one really good one off of it. Yesterday I noticed one small one starting to turn red but it looks "wrinkled".. the only way I can describe it. The other green ones are doing the same thing. Any ideas morons?

Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 11:10 AM (/IQip)

8 Yesterday I noticed one small one starting to turn red but it looks "wrinkled".. the only way I can describe it. The other green ones are doing the same thing. Any ideas morons? Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 04:10 PM (/IQip) Botox?

Posted by: BCochran1981 - Tatted, Rested and Ready at August 31, 2014 11:12 AM (GEICT)

9 lol.. Cochran.. you are a big help!

Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 11:13 AM (/IQip)

10 I'll take the burning absinthe bucket challenge to raise awareness for... whatever.

Posted by: Naes at August 31, 2014 11:14 AM (YhayY)

11 I believe tomatoes need high levels of calcium. Some people mix in eggshells into the soil. They degrade fairly fast and provide the needed calcium.

Posted by: Dandolo at August 31, 2014 11:15 AM (0XBx+)

12 That first picture is just nuts. In other words: awesome.

Posted by: t-bird at August 31, 2014 11:20 AM (FcR7P)

13 This is where I tell my story about being at the local farmer's market picking up some ostrich (mmmm ostrich) and the hippie chick who was blathering away about how awesome it was to eat local and I finally had it and let out, all deadpan, "Yes. The great herds of North Carolina ostrich." Woooooooooooooosh right over her head. I thought the vendor was going to choke to death trying not to laugh.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD. We should be so lucky. at August 31, 2014 11:21 AM (IrByp)

14 7 Okay.. well food thread.. tomatoes are food. I am growing a tomato plant and I got one really good one off of it. Yesterday I noticed one small one starting to turn red but it looks "wrinkled".. the only way I can describe it. The other green ones are doing the same thing. Any ideas morons? What do you have planted around it?

Posted by: Zhytamyr at August 31, 2014 11:21 AM (91nzM)

15 Recipe saved, copy of it sent to wife as a suggestion. Life is good.

Posted by: NR Pax at August 31, 2014 11:22 AM (ODsL5)

16 It's in a giant pot. I have fertilized every 2 weeks, and water it about every other day.

Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 11:23 AM (/IQip)

17

Yes, agree on the tomatoes.  Wife says the LaRoma tomatoes I've been growing the last couple of years are the best ever.  They are like the Roma tomatoes, but larger and taste better.

jewells, sounds like there's somethin wrong w/ your tomato plant.  Hope that helps.

Posted by: Farmer at August 31, 2014 11:24 AM (y9FVx)

18 I knew a girl from Adovada once.

Posted by: goatexchange at August 31, 2014 11:24 AM (sYUHT)

19 What's the point of setting your alcoholic beverage on fire?

Posted by: garrett at August 31, 2014 11:26 AM (xOA9A)

20 It's in a giant pot. I have fertilized every 2 weeks, and water it about every other day. Do you have a cat or cats? They may be doing the same.

Posted by: t-bird at August 31, 2014 11:27 AM (FcR7P)

21 My husband's favorite summer salad is a cilantro dressing over heirloom tomatoes and arugula. 

Dressing base, by weight:  2 parts shallots, 2 parts garlic, 3 parts cilantro, 2 parts olive oil.  Mince in a small food processor, in that order, stirring together dry in a larger glass jar, then adding the oil immediately after mincing the cilantro to stop oxidation.  Add a dab of oil on top and refrigerate.

Use a scoop of the base, add a bit more olive oil if desired, then O or other brand of champagne vinegar.  Toss with heirloom tomatoes and arugula, then sprinkle with freshly minced chives and a dash of black pepper.

Posted by: Sylvia at August 31, 2014 11:27 AM (1X5xy)

22 I tried growing tomatoes a couple of years ago. They were inedible. Simply ghastly, and I threw them out. Supermarket tomatoes are infinitely better.

Posted by: rickl at August 31, 2014 11:27 AM (sdi6R)

23 jewells

Tomatoes need to be watered deeply and less frequently, as well. Every other day is too often from my experience. Also, if the pot it is in is plastic it may be retaining too much moisture and rotting the fruit.

Posted by: Dandolo at August 31, 2014 11:28 AM (0XBx+)

24 I think locovores should be forced to eat only food that is found within 4 miles of their interesting, gritty, gentilized loft neighborhoods.  Since the most self righteous ones live in large urban areas they can eat lichen, moss and hobos and enjoy it.

Posted by: kindltot at August 31, 2014 11:28 AM (t//F+)

25 What's the point of setting your alcoholic beverage on fire?

FIRE MADE IT GOOD.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_LkH-1JiA-E


Posted by: HR -- SMOD 2016 or else at August 31, 2014 11:29 AM (hO8IJ)

26

My husband's favorite summer salad is a cilantro dressing over heirloom tomatoes and arugula.

Posted by: Sylvia at August 31, 2014 04:27 PM

Have you SEEN the price of arugula!

Posted by: Barky O'Bama at August 31, 2014 11:30 AM (y9FVx)

27 No cats or any pets.

Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 11:30 AM (/IQip)

28 Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 04:23 PM (/IQip) I think someone here said that Epsom salts for the magnesium was good for tomatoes. I know that carol recommended that for roses and it really works.

Posted by: Hrothgar at August 31, 2014 11:31 AM (o3MSL)

29 16 It's in a giant pot. I have fertilized every 2 weeks, and water it about every other day. It there any obvious horn worm damage on the stalk that the wrickled toms are on?

Posted by: Zhytamyr at August 31, 2014 11:32 AM (91nzM)

30 "Locavore is a dirty, stinking, vile word that raises the hackles of any normal person. It is redolent of patchouli oil, stinking hippies, late model Volvos and Priuses (Prii?), and ignorant, illogical analyses of the current state of food production. Eat Local, Act Global, is the logical extension of this stupidity, and may be even worse. But some things really are better when purchased locally, and not for the socio-political, masturbatory fantasies of the soft Left." I skewered that whole concept in this classic post: http://tinyurl.com/q2djzhb The Elitism and Racism of "Local Food" ""Eat local" is the latest intellectual fad on the Left Coast. These "locavores," as adherents like to call themselves, want you to eat only food grown near where you live - say, within 100 miles of your home. The goal, in theory, is to foster "sustainable agriculture," to lower the carbon footprint of your food (which generally travels thousands of miles from farm to kitchen table), and consequently get that warm-and-fuzzy back-to-the-earth type feeling. Oh, did I mention that the locavore movement is most popular in California? This little detail is significant because California is just about the only state in the entire union that has the climate and the soil to grow such a wide variety of produce that it could even theoretically support its current population with "locally grown" food. While food is grown in every state, most of that food is not sold directly to individual consumers - it is sold to food manufacturers around the country and around the world. So even if you lived right in the middle of a Kansas wheat field, you probably couldn't "eat locally" because you would have no retail access to that wheat, which will instead probably end up in a bagel at Coney Island. [image] Much more relevant data about the viability of eating locally can be found on this map created by the Department of Agriculture which shows the value of agricultural products "Sold Directly to Individuals for Human Consumption." As you can see, most of the produce which you can actually buy yourself is either grown in California, the West Coast, or in New England - precisely the areas where the "locavore" movement is popular. As a result, "eating locally' at current population levels is only even possible if you live in liberal enclaves on the coasts; the vast majority of Americans in the rest of the country couldn't "eat locally" even if they tried. But that map doesn't tell the whole story. Most of the areas shown actually specialize in specific types of fruits or vegetables, so that if you want to be a locavore in Washington state, you're going to be eating a hell of a lot of apples and cherries. If you live in Georgia, brace yourself for the all-peanut diet, with maybe a peach for dessert in summer. Want to be a locavore and yet still be able to eat anything made out of grapes or almonds or lettuce or avocados or cantaloupes or any number of other standard foodstuffs? Well, the only way you could eat any of those things - and dozens of other common foods - is if you lived in Caifornia, because that's just about the only place where such products are commercially grown in the US. Which gets to the heart of the elitism and hypocrisy of the locavore movement. We can sit here in California and brag about our uniquely fertile and sun-kissed state, and exude faux despair: "Why doesn't everybody eat locally and sustainably - like we Californians do?" But of course under that mask of concern is a smirk, because we know full well that people in Buffalo and Chicago and El Paso have no choice but to eat food transported there from the rest of the country. Which, you see, renders them globe-destroying rubes with unsustainable dietary carbon footprints. So we asshole Californians invented the locavore movement to lord over the rest of the country how superior we are. (In retaliation, I propose to the midwestern states that they withhold all soybeans from the soyless Californians to create a catastrophic tofu shortage amongst the indigenous vegetarians. Food fight!)"

Posted by: zombie at August 31, 2014 11:33 AM (/UYSJ)

31 Ruskin Tomatoes are pretty d@mn good. Had a pizza once with heirloom tomatoes with a plum tomato sauce. It was exceptional.

Posted by: Hadoop at August 31, 2014 11:35 AM (Ph479)

32 The great herds of North Carolina ostrich.
Good thing you are doing your part to keep the population down. The feathery bastids have spread to New Hampshire and North Dakota. Further, probably.

Posted by: fluffy at August 31, 2014 11:36 AM (Ua6T/)

33 We can sit here in California and brag about our uniquely fertile and sun-kissed state Not if I have any say in the matter!

Posted by: The Snail Darter at August 31, 2014 11:37 AM (FcR7P)

34 Want to be a locavore and yet still be able to eat anything made out of grapes or almonds or lettuce or avocados or cantaloupes or any number of other standard foodstuffs? Well, the only way you could eat any of those things - and dozens of other common foods - is if you lived in Caifornia, because that's just about the only place where such products are commercially grown in the US.

I can buy lettuce and cantaloupes grown in Indiana...for about three weeks a year.  And it costs more than the grocery store.

Posted by: HR -- SMOD 2016 or else at August 31, 2014 11:39 AM (hO8IJ)

35 I made pear crisp the other day. 


The crust is 1/2 cup of rolled oats, 1/4 cup flour, about 1/4 cup butter and 1/2 cup of brown sugar and any salt you want to add. Cut it together until it is large crumbs.

Then core and dice your pears into chunks the size of the last joint of your thumb - or the size of someone else's last joint of their thumb if you prefer and you have one just laying around as an example -  until you fill up a 8x8x2 pan most of the way.  Remember you need a space at the top for the crumbs and for inevitable bubble-overs.

Sprinkle sugar on the pears if you want, dot with butter if you feel like it, then spread the crumb topping over the pears to cover them all

Bake at 350F for 40 minutes.  Serve with vanilla ice-cream

Posted by: kindltot at August 31, 2014 11:39 AM (t//F+)

36 Food!

Posted by: Y-not back from the sheepdog trials at August 31, 2014 11:41 AM (zDsvJ)

37 Localvore is the new 'gluetin free. And 99 out 100 peeps don't know what glutin is anyway

Posted by: L. Pooserty at August 31, 2014 11:43 AM (Qm+1a)

38 This recipe, from Marcella Hazan's Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, is maybe even a little ahead of Cabrese as my favorite thing to do with tomatoes in season. Mash 4-5 garlic cloves with 1-2 tsp salt to form a fine, well-mixed paste. If you have a good mortar and pestle, this is the time to use it. Mix the paste with 2 Tbsp good red wine vinegar (I like Badia y Coltibuono) and let sit 20 min or more to blend. Skin 2 lbs ripe tomatoes (I prefer to not use the boiling water technique here because I think it messes with the texture too much for this dish; I use a ceramic peeler, and yes, it's a pain) and slice thinly. Lay the tomato slices out on a large serving platter that has a bit of depth to hold juice. Wash and dry 12 leaves of fresh basil, tear each leaf into 3 pieces, and scatter over the tomatoes. Strain the garlic-salt-vinegar mixture over the tomatoes, using a fine-mesh strainer and pressing at the end to get all the juice out. Sprinkle over enough good, fresh EVOO to coat the tomatoes, toss and serve. Definitely include a crusty plain white loaf -- soaking the juice up with bread is at least half of what is wonderful about this dish.

Posted by: Splunge at August 31, 2014 11:43 AM (qyomX)

39 I'm not seeing any damage from any pests.

Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 11:44 AM (/IQip)

40 I'm not seeing any damage from any pests.

Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 11:44 AM (/IQip)

41 And 99 out 100 peeps don't know what glutin is anyway Posted by: L. Pooserty at August 31, 2014 04:43 PM (Qm+1a) Sure I do. It's the stuff my wife stays away from now that makes all my food taste like cardboard

Posted by: Nevergiveup at August 31, 2014 11:46 AM (nzKvP)

42 Oh heck Y-not, are the sheep dog trials still going on?  I have been dead set against capital punishment in this series since as far as I can tell the "genocide" claim is based on specious reasoning and hearsay, and "conspiracy to commit" charges are best hung on specific actions and not on general intent. 
But I'm no legal expert.

So, are there any good lamb recipes?

Posted by: kindltot at August 31, 2014 11:48 AM (t//F+)

43 Glutin free, Localvores, vegans, etc all are forms of Orthorexia, or the feeling of moral superiority over others based on ones food choices

Posted by: L. Pooserty at August 31, 2014 11:49 AM (Qm+1a)

44 39 I'm not seeing any damage from any pests. What kind of fertillizer are you using? Scots Miracle Grow?

Posted by: Zhytamyr at August 31, 2014 11:52 AM (91nzM)

45 Jewells, temp changes can cause 'maters to wrinkle, cat face, etc. Did you have a coolish spell when it was flowering?

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor is Ginger no more at August 31, 2014 11:53 AM (ET1Bo)

46 Locavore just means locally grown food. And yes that does limit you on the East Coast although Elliott Coleman manages to garden 4 seasons in Maine. WA state also grow wheat and probably more of the soft wheat you'd use in bagels. Climate is decent in the Yakima valley, so lots of produce from there. And there are a lot of vineyards now too. I don't really care about the locavore nonsense. I do care about decent tasting food. I'm not going to pay more for organic if it doesn't taste good. I did read this statement that stuck with me: be a food producer, not just a food consumer. I want to get back to growing more of my own food. (And we will be making hard cider from those apples soon!)

Posted by: Notsothoreau at August 31, 2014 11:53 AM (Lqy/e)

47 Like me, gigantic bresteses belong on girls. Not on chickens.

Posted by: jwpaine at August 31, 2014 11:58 AM (68O4K)

48 Dry farmed tomatoes. If you don't know about them look them up. They will change your life. Short season, though.

Posted by: Tutu at August 31, 2014 11:59 AM (CpWI4)

49 Organic Tomato-tone.

Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 12:02 PM (/IQip)

50 One of the tricks to growing cantaloups and eggplants in Western Oregon is watering deep but only once a week.  I water with 5 gallon buckets with a 1/4 hole in the bottom.  The water runs out fairly slowly and goes into the root zone of the plants. The eggplants don't cool down so they can keep growing, and the melons concentrate their sugars.  The other trick is that I plant my melons about 6' apart so they have room to sprawl and so they don't have to compete for nutrients and water.  This is hardly square foot gardening, but I have access to land that I can till up.  Not everyone can do this or is willing to take up that much of a backyard.

Posted by: kindltot at August 31, 2014 12:10 PM (t//F+)

51 Had to take fruit again to a church brunch. I took apples. In pie crust.

Posted by: Mama AJ at August 31, 2014 12:13 PM (SUKHu)

52 Had to take fruit again to a church brunch. I took apples. In pie crust.

Posted by: Mama AJ at August 31, 2014 12:13 PM (SUKHu)

53

@3- LOL! I will use that the next time my granola-crunching sister from VT uses the term (which will be in any conversation).

I went to a farmers market with her there once and everything for sale was prefaced with: locavore, free range, organic, fair-trade, sustainable.  Even in SoCal it's not quite that over the top.

I love a fresh homegrown tomato sandwich on a roll with mayo, salt and pepper.  Nothing better than that!

Posted by: keena at August 31, 2014 12:14 PM (RiTnx)

54 Two comments, one pie. I didn't make my fancy apple pie with currants and dried cranberries in a lemon-nutmeg crust. Any favorite variations on the ol' classic?

Posted by: Mama AJ at August 31, 2014 12:14 PM (SUKHu)

55 Posted by: Mama AJ at August 31, 2014 05:14 PM (SUKHu) Your fancy pie filling sounds a lot like mincemeat without the meat.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at August 31, 2014 12:16 PM (GDulk)

56 There is one good thing about living in Austin that I will miss. They have a grocery delivery service that sources all the local farms/ ranches. While produce is hit and miss, the meat selection is far better than any store (I'm looking at you, Whole Foods) Luckily we should stay close enough for me to still get all that meat, but it won't be delivered to my door. *pout*

Posted by: Lauren at August 31, 2014 12:17 PM (BPMYx)

57 Donut. Burgers.

Posted by: inspired by the ONT at August 31, 2014 12:20 PM (V8ufD)

58 I know it's been showcased on this thread before, but it's still hilarious. I'm sure he's muddling a locally-grown Brooklyn blood orange. Sh*t Bartenders Say: http://tinyurl.com/7p8cjev

Posted by: All Hail Eris at August 31, 2014 12:24 PM (QBm1P)

59 >>Your fancy pie filling sounds a lot like mincemeat without the meat. I never really thought about that! Maybe I'll toss in some leftover steak next time...yeh, maybe not really. The only downside of the wonderful pie is that it takes a long time to bake...because we keep opening the oven door to snort, er smell it.

Posted by: Mama AJ at August 31, 2014 12:25 PM (SUKHu)

60 "57 Donut. Burgers. " I've been to that place. It is good.

Posted by: Lauren at August 31, 2014 12:29 PM (BPMYx)

61 Anyone have any good experiences with tofu? Askin' for a friend....

Posted by: Greensleeve at August 31, 2014 12:30 PM (VVYvo)

62 Dr. Mrs. T. and I belong to a local farmshare, which naturally is a hippie "organic" farm. Or, well, it used to be. We had two years of losing most of the summer tomato crop to fungus, and finally the farmers polled the farmshare members: should we spray fungicide? Eighty-six percent of the members said fuck Mother Nature, poison the bastards. As with so many things, liberals are willing to abandon their principles when it benefits them to do so.

Posted by: Trimegistus at August 31, 2014 12:30 PM (DQbIC)

63 A better life through chemicals I always say.

Posted by: Ronster at August 31, 2014 12:32 PM (GmOIG)

64 Best produce OTC? Japan, hands down. When I lived there the quality was similar to my Grandpa's garden. Haven't had a good tomatoe since he pased that I didn't grow myself, or that I bought in Japan (at any store).

Posted by: Fewenuff at August 31, 2014 12:32 PM (zPNX5)

65 30 zombie Why do you hate Andronico's?

Posted by: Avenging Cheetos® Godfather at August 31, 2014 12:35 PM (FlRtG)

66 19 What's the point of setting your alcoholic beverage on fire? Posted by: garrett at August 31, 2014 04:26 PM (xOA9A) You got a problem with that, you fucking shit-sucker?

Posted by: Bill the Butcher at August 31, 2014 12:36 PM (mx5oN)

67 >>So, are there any good lamb recipes?

LOL, kindlot!

After watching those damned sheep jerking the dogs around, I am for capital punishment of sheep!

Here's what we had for our late lunch:

https://twitter.com/moxiemom/status/506192994232311809/photo/1

Lamb burgers: ground lamb mixed w/ garlic, red onion, cilantro, and Persian adwiyan spice mix. Topped w/ goat cheese, tomato, & yogurt dill dressing


Posted by: Y-not at August 31, 2014 12:38 PM (zDsvJ)

68 I live in the South Bronx. If I'm going to be a locovore, my diet will consist of prostitutes and crack rocks. Or I could just go to the supermarket like a normal person.

Posted by: Oschisms at August 31, 2014 12:38 PM (oSS/M)

69 >>>I've been to that place. It is good.

Posted by: Lauren at August 31, 2014 05:29 PM (BPMYx)<<<



And local. Don't even need pants to go there.

Posted by: inspired by the ONT at August 31, 2014 12:40 PM (V8ufD)

70 There was an alarming number of hipsters at the sheepdog trials this year. We couldn't figure out why. Didn't see many the previous three years.

Posted by: Y-not at August 31, 2014 12:40 PM (zDsvJ)

71 I've never been good at making apple pie - it's an inability to make a good crust. So I usually make apple crisp, apple spice cake (http://tinyurl.com/6n4g2zp) or apple molasses pancakes.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 31, 2014 12:41 PM (D/504)

72 Zombie - Locovores or Orthorexics?
http://www.eatingdisordershelpguide.com/orthorexia.html

I enjoy local foods, such as CO's Olathe corn (so sweet!), but it shouldn't be a crusade.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 31, 2014 12:44 PM (D/504)

73 Living in Alberta I'd probably be restricted to meat, dairy and grain products in winter. Certainly no fruits or vegetables. Or there are honey producers are short distance away , which would meet my Mead requirement. So I suppose I could survive on local foods.

Posted by: Northernlurker ( AKA TGinTV) at August 31, 2014 12:44 PM (0oN6k)

74 On this day in 1918, began the Red Terror.

Posted by: Gustav Klimt at August 31, 2014 12:48 PM (iQIUe)

75 some awesome beef is at tallgrassbeef.com. not corn finished-so it's hormone free, and subsidy free. Also is good for you-more CLA than salmon.

Posted by: pointsnfigures at August 31, 2014 12:50 PM (LnE5F)

76
I've done it.

After years of searching*, years, and years of failure, I've finally discovered the female name that doesn't result in numerous porn hits when googled, or binged.

Justina Swansea Galactica.

* I was only porn-surfing odd female names for the intriguing, thought provoking articles.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at August 31, 2014 12:50 PM (0IhFx)

77 "Great tomatoes are rarely to be found anywhere other than your backyard or the local farm stand. They just don't travel well," Im not so sure I believe that statement to be totally accurate. Green tomato is a far hardy animal than its' ripened brother. There is no market for green tomato in the US, except for ignorant Bible-thumping hicks.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid, ignorant hick. Bible in tow. at August 31, 2014 12:51 PM (+HXMd)

78 7 Okay.. well food thread.. tomatoes are food. I am growing a tomato plant and I got one really good one off of it. Yesterday I noticed one small one starting to turn red but it looks "wrinkled".. the only way I can describe it. The other green ones are doing the same thing. Any ideas morons? Posted by: jewells45 trying to keep from going crazy at August 31, 2014 04:10 PM (/IQip Side-dressing of Cialis should do the trick!

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid, ignorant hick. Bible in tow. at August 31, 2014 12:52 PM (+HXMd)

79 Fish sauce in carne adovada? 

Posted by: huerfano at August 31, 2014 12:56 PM (bAGA/)

80 Hey yall I went to our local Wegmans, to load up on produce and meat. They have great fresh food, and their meat is as good as a specialty butcher, but you will pay out the nose for it. I can understand why so many lower income families don't eat healthy-because it is so freaking expensive. Mac and cheese, spaghetti, chicken nuggets-all much cheaper than fresh, and when your food budget is cut to pay for higher gas prices, taxes and health insurance premiums, something has got to give. And for dinner tonight, I am making beef and broccoli stir fry, and "lightened" General Tso's chicken with snow peas and carrots. Yum.

Posted by: Moki at August 31, 2014 12:56 PM (bAB8f)

81 I can understand why so many lower income families don't eat healthy-because it is so freaking expensive.
--

Yep, it's expensive and it's often also time-consuming. Lower income working families don't have the time to cook from scratch. It's possible they could have the time if they had the know-how, but most don't.

Posted by: Y-not at August 31, 2014 01:05 PM (zDsvJ)

82 61 Anyone have any good experiences with tofu? Askin' for a friend.... Posted by: Greensleeve at August 31, 2014 05:30 PM (VVYvo) -------------- Deep-fried tofu with peanut sauce is actually pretty delicious. It's crispy on the outside/creamy on the inside, and the peanut sauce gives it substance. Any Thai restaurant should have this on the menu.

Posted by: All Hail Eris at August 31, 2014 01:06 PM (QBm1P)

83 Lauren, Are you talking about Gourdough's? I'm still mad at you for abandoning me!!! Even though Austin is a leftist hell-hole enclave, it is possible to eat locally for pretty much everything except maybe some grains like wheat. I could be wrong there though, haven't really tried looking it up. I get eggs locally. I know you can grow almost anything here, or they have greenhouses that do somewhere in the state. You can get any kind of meat imaginable locally and milk too. The only thing we can't get locally are some fruits that will only grow in certain areas like cherries in the NW.

Posted by: lindafell at August 31, 2014 01:10 PM (nKVlf)

84 I'm grilling Chernobyl Rat Turds: Mix a block of cream cheese with a cup of shredded Monterey jack. Kick it up with kickin' chicken spice mix, some black pepper, chili powder and a couple shakes pepper sauce, and some minced onion or shallot. Spread into a halved jalapeno, cover with a lengthwise-halved little smokey sausage and wrap with a halved bacon slice. Grill over indirect heat for a couple hours at 250 degrees. Throw some wood chips on if you wish. Cook until the bacon is crispy. Consume with mass-quantities of beverage of choice.

Posted by: Cicero Kaboom! Kid, ignorant hick. Bible in tow. at August 31, 2014 01:12 PM (+HXMd)

85 Jewells I usually see wrinkled 'maters in the fall so I think its a coolness thing. Still edible though not as tasty IME.

Posted by: PaleRider at August 31, 2014 01:12 PM (Zo60C)

86 "Are you talking about Gourdough's? I'm still mad at you for abandoning me!!! " Yep! So good. I know. The hippies finally pushed me over the edge.

Posted by: Lauren at August 31, 2014 01:17 PM (BPMYx)

87 Deep-fried tofu with peanut sauce is actually pretty delicious. It's crispy on the outside/creamy on the inside, and the peanut sauce gives it substance. Any Thai restaurant should have this on the menu. Posted by: All Hail Eris at August 31, 2014 06:06 PM (QBm1P) Thank you.

Posted by: Greensleeve at August 31, 2014 01:23 PM (VVYvo)

88 Lauren, When are you going?

Posted by: lindafell at August 31, 2014 01:32 PM (nKVlf)

89 Nood

Posted by: Y-not at August 31, 2014 01:36 PM (zDsvJ)

90 61 Anyone have any good experiences with tofu? Askin' for a friend.... Can't make Hot & Sour soup w/o it- wouldn't be the same. If you're trying to hide it Melissa's brand used to have a vegetarian chorizo that was more or less tofu, spices, and rolled oats (for texture), that being said you did not know it wasn't pork chorizo unless you knew.

Posted by: Zhytamyr at August 31, 2014 01:37 PM (91nzM)

91 [delurking] I have to say, if anyone tried to serve that "carne adovada" here in New Mexico they'd get fed to the coyotes. Proper carne adovada is made with New Mexico red chiles (yes, that's the correct spelling here). Raisins? RAISINS?!? [back to lurking]

Posted by: Fred Weldon at August 31, 2014 01:51 PM (pLvH6)

92 Posted by: Fred Weldon at August 31, 2014 06:51 PM


Yep.  No orange juice, fish sauce or pasilla or ancho chiles.  I also don't use onions, chicken stock or cumin (because it smells like dirty socks).  Red chile, Mexican oregano, sliced pork chops of the cheap kind and garlic.

Posted by: huerfano at August 31, 2014 01:58 PM (bAGA/)

93 Posted by: Lizzy at August 31, 2014 05:41 PM (D/504) I do that too for the exact same reason. John never really cared for pie, except pumpkin, so I never figured out how to make crusts. Now I can't teach my kids. Maybe I can get my mom to show them how.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at August 31, 2014 02:29 PM (GDulk)

94 I just had fresh Jacksonville tomatoes and Brookshires fresh-baked sourdough bread with their thick-sliced bacon and Hellman's real mayo all wrapped into a killer sammich. And a Shiner bock. Now that's what we call a light supper in ETEX.

Posted by: Erowmero at August 31, 2014 02:36 PM (go5uR)

95 Anyone ever pickled green tomatoes? I made a few jars today and they didn't come out like I expected (slightly mushy and the skins started to peel off), so I'm not sure if I did something wrong, or that's what they're supposed to look like.

93
'I never figured out how to make the crusts'
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette at August 31, 2014 07:29 PM (GDulk)

Add an egg to the dough. The crust will roll out like a dream. And treat it gently, don't kneed it too much, or it'll get tough.

Posted by: right wing whippersnapper at August 31, 2014 02:39 PM (B+8EN)

96 Sticky Wicket @ 76-
All (or most) of the best people come from places with names like Swansea. Word.

Posted by: Erowmero at August 31, 2014 02:52 PM (go5uR)

97 A woman's perspective: I'll trade hair for high testosterone in a man every time.

Posted by: E.F. Taylor at September 01, 2014 06:14 AM (rRxHq)

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