September 30, 2014

Ebola: EVERYONE SETTLE DOWN (tmi3rd)
— Open Blogger

Hi there, Morons and Moronettes.

As we're all aware, the first confirmed case of Ebola (that we didn't bring here deliberately) has made it to our shores, and is currently in strict isolation at Dallas Presbyterian Hospital.

This, obviously, is not good news, but let's get everyone up to speed on how Ebola works, how you stay away from it, how it's spread, and a few other bits.

More below the fold...


First of all:

dontpanic.png

Seriously, folks- I used to work emergency medicine at a hospital in Fort Worth. Whenever something scary gets going disease-wise, everybody and their grandmother descends upon the emergency room. If you're not absolutely sure you've got something you need urgently looked at, call the doctor's office and either go see them the next day or talk to whoever's on call. Most doctors' offices have an answering service for that very reason.

We saw this happen with a couple of ugly influenza strains in '09 and '10- it eats up all our resources, and all of a sudden, you've got a waiting room full of people who are scared, irritable, and having to wait a long time. That seldom goes well, and you mainly wind up exposed to the disease that the guy next to you actually has.

The bottom line is that you'll show up at the emergency room and it'll look like the entrance to a Best Buy before opening on Black Friday.

So please, don't panic. Now let's talk about how the bug works...

warning science.jpg

The Ebola virus disease is caused by a virus called the Ebola virus (I know, Captain Obvious), or EBOV, and it causes a usually-fatal hemorrhagic fever. Hemorrhagic fevers are thought to cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, which is a nice way of saying that your blood goes through its clotting mechanism within your blood vessels without clumping. This eats up your ability to form clots where and when you really need them. This, in turn, leads to all sorts of other systemic problems that I won't bore/scare you with; the Wikipedia entry on it details this just fine.

important_point.png

The important part of this is how Ebola is spread, and thus how you avoid it.

First of all, this is believed to be the Ebola Zaire strain. The Ebola Zaire strain is NOT- I repeat, NOT airborne. Thus, you can only get Ebola Zaire by handling body fluids of an infected or dead Ebola patient.

Body fluids- as obvious as this may seem- include (but are not limited to) blood, sweat, tears, vomit, urine, feces, semen, vaginal secretions, and the like. You can also get it by contact with contaminated medical equipment that has come into contact with infected or dead patients. Finally, you can also get it by coming into direct contact with infected animals (like eating infected meat, which is believed to be part of how this epidemic got going in the first place).

biohazard.png

Equally important- and I want to emphasize this- Ebola can only be spread human-to-human AFTER SYMPTOMS BEGIN. Symptoms can pop up anywhere from two days to three weeks after exposure. If they're not sick after three weeks, they're not going to get sick, and this has been established.

Now, the Dallas patient was symptomatic and out of the hospital for a total of four days. Certainly, anyone this cat came into contact with is at risk, but remember: it's very contagious but not as easily transmitted. If you're in the D/FW area, just stay calm.

does this look right.png

So what are the symptoms? Well, unfortunately, they look a lot like the onset of cold, flu, malaria, dengue, et cetera. Here's the list (pay attention to (pay attention to the early stuff; if you get to the back end, you're already in trouble):

ebola symptoms.jpg

Here's what the virus looks like:

ebola zaire.jpg

Just like with any viral disease, there is no actual cure for it (we've never actually cured a virus in human history), but that doesn't mean we can't treat the symptoms. We do that through what we call supportive care: we pump fluids into you to keep your blood volume up and to keep you from dehydrating, we give you stuff to get the fever down and keep the pain at bay, we may give you blood if you need it, and so forth.

conclusion.png

So to wrap this up, here's the story: yeah, having a case loose in a major metropolitan area is a bad thing. Yeah, having this cat loose in the public with Ebola is a very bad thing.

You get past it in public by washing your hands frequently, and by not touching your face- don't give a bug a door to come in, whether it be the common cold all the way to Zombie Maker or whatever. Cover your mouth and nose if you cough or sneeze, and all the things you're used to doing as we get into cold and flu season.

If you're genuinely getting sick and you're worried, by all means, have someone take a look at you, but please don't panic. The emergency rooms are going to be busy for probably the next month with people overreacting (it always works out that way), and you're going to wait a lot longer to be seen, at the very least.

I hope this helps- as I'm currently an EMT trying to get into medical school, I can't give you medical advice much beyond "have someone look at you", but if you need me for something, you can always find me on Twitter.

Here's the CDC's information sheet on the outbreak, and there's a great infographic at the link as well.

Y'all just stay safe, informed, and aware, and this'll hopefully just be a bad memory in about a month.

-tmi3rd

Posted by: Open Blogger at 07:00 PM | Comments (83)
Post contains 966 words, total size 7 kb.

1 jenniferfeldman: City of Dallas spokesperson Sana Syed confirms Dallas ambulance 37 was in use for two days after the EBOLA patient was transported. CNN Nope not going to panic.

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at September 30, 2014 07:05 PM (b6koZ)

2 Again, as the post says above- very contagious but not easy to transmit.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:09 PM (cxomr)

3 Good post tmi3rd. However......very contagious but not easy to transmit seems like a contradiction. If'n you know what I mean. An oxymoron is a hard thing for a moron to cope with.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 07:12 PM (MDgS8)

4 One panic caveat: Ebola can survive on surfaces for several days + Ebola can transmit through sweat and mucus. 

We all generally assume that "Oh, don't touch dead bodies or blood and you're golden", but that is proving NOT to be the case in the latest African outbreak.  Ebola may not be airborne, but it's just as nasty getting on surfaces as the flu.  One sweaty guy on a bus + passengers rubbing their eyes or sniffling their nose = potential transmission.

It's not stuff to fuck around with.

Posted by: Rex at September 30, 2014 07:12 PM (mfL5+)

5 What we don't know is what will bite us in the ass. We have no data on Ebola spreading in this country.

Posted by: eman at September 30, 2014 07:12 PM (MQEz6)

6 Obama - Ebola : both terrible

Posted by: The Jackhole at September 30, 2014 07:13 PM (dULJN)

7 It's not time to panic until it's time to panic.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 07:13 PM (MDgS8)

8 I though Captain Nine-Iron sent our military to shoot all those Ebola thingies. What gives?

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at September 30, 2014 07:14 PM (zBFQu)

9 Interesting times for the Obama generation.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 07:15 PM (MDgS8)

10 It's easy to panic when you don't trust the People In Charge. We know the People In Charge lie when it suits them, which is all the time. So when the People In Charge tell us it's all cool, no worries, we tend to think they're lying 'cause it's what they do.

Posted by: katya the designated driver at September 30, 2014 07:16 PM (WuBo6)

11 Second look?

Posted by: The Black Death at September 30, 2014 07:16 PM (zBFQu)

12 Contagious is defined as "capable of being transmitted by bodily contact with an infected person or object." Transmissible is defined as "A contagious disease wherein the pathogen is transmissible from one host to another." What does that mean? It means that yeah, if you come into contact with the bug, you can get it. It also means that it's a tough bug to come into contact with. Can it survive on surfaces? Of course it can. It's also a very fragile bug, and dies well if sprayed down with Lysol. It's not a tough, persistent bug like MRSA. Basic cleaning- if it's done- will handle it.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:17 PM (cxomr)

13 katya -- no doubt. When the lie-bots say don't worry it's time to worry.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 07:17 PM (MDgS8)

14 We should be concerned. Very concerned. I plan on sending a letter to my newspaper condemning this virus for daring to come into this country unannounced.

Posted by: Soona at September 30, 2014 07:18 PM (hO7m3)

15 It's easy to panic when you don't trust the People In Charge. We know the People In Charge lie when it suits them, Just because Ebola puts on a Kobe Bryant jersey doesn't make it a varsity disease.

Posted by: Barky I Numbnuts at September 30, 2014 07:19 PM (zBFQu)

16 Has anybody seen Carl?!

Posted by: Lori at September 30, 2014 07:19 PM (MQEz6)

17 I think this Public Service Thread was just counter-stomped by a crazed ONT.

Posted by: Cicero (@cicero) at September 30, 2014 07:20 PM (zBFQu)

18 I live not far from Dallas' Presbyterian Hospital and my eyes and butt are bleeding. I should be okay, right?

Posted by: Brandon Michael the Hobbit at September 30, 2014 07:20 PM (oWhIO)

19 Its even harder to get Aids... than this... Yet... Aids was an epidemic. Panic? No... Pay attention? Yes... And ask our Government VERY hard questions...

Posted by: Romeo13 at September 30, 2014 07:20 PM (f0pWu)

20 Do these things periodically mutate?

Posted by: [/i][/b][/s]akula51 at September 30, 2014 07:21 PM (R5qgD)

21 And ask our Government VERY hard questions... #ASkMeAgainButSlower

Posted by: Jen Psaki at September 30, 2014 07:21 PM (zBFQu)

22 And by lie-bots I in no way intended to impugn you tmi3rd.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 07:21 PM (MDgS8)

23 Shane, would you be a honey and scratch my back?

Posted by: Lori at September 30, 2014 07:22 PM (MQEz6)

24 And for those interested: here is the story on airborne transmission of Ebola that everyone was talking about in the last Ebola post.

http://tinyurl.com/nz2rwdn

It seems to suggest that the official CDC story on no airborne transmission is on a par with the government's story about Lois Lerner's emails. This is my shocked face :O

Posted by: [/i] [/b] [/s] [/u] An Observation at September 30, 2014 07:24 PM (ylhEn)

25 I will rout this virus out of the country like I routed AQ out of the ME.

Posted by: Baraka Hussein O at September 30, 2014 07:24 PM (hO7m3)

26 Don't listen to him. HE'S IN ON IT!!!!!!

Posted by: Ostral B Heretic at September 30, 2014 07:25 PM (4LMNs)

27 None taken, eleven. The diseases I get to dodge where I am are things like that ugly enterovirus and some other visiting bugs that they see way south of here.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:27 PM (cxomr)

28 I don't mean to be a dick but the definition of "transmissible" contains the word "contagious". Which means that transmissible is in effect contagious. It's a distinction without a difference.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 07:27 PM (MDgS8)

29

I wish the OP would clear that up - my understanding is that, while Ebola doesn't meet the *medical* definition of airborne, you don't want an infected person coughing in your personal space. ??

Posted by: Fen at September 30, 2014 07:28 PM (1OMtW)

30 24 And for those interested: here is the story on airborne transmission of Ebola that everyone was talking about in the last Ebola post. http://tinyurl.com/nz2rwdn Posted by: An Observation at October 01, 2014 12:24 AM (ylhEn) My take on this story is not to let monkeys sneeze on you.

Posted by: Brandon Michael the Hobbit at September 30, 2014 07:29 PM (oWhIO)

31 eleven, I won't try to dissuade you if you're terrified of this bug; it's scary. It's just a lot harder to get than everyone thinks it is.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:32 PM (cxomr)

32 Did anyone watch the "Ebola" documentary on tv last week? I can't remember what channel it was on...maybe Discovery. This was a *very* recent news documentary about the outbreak. They interviewed both Dr. Brantly and Nancy Writebol.

What I was surprised to learn was that Nancy Writebol was not a 'nurse' as the news had described her, but an administrator. Perhaps she had nursing credentials, but she was not treating patients. She was only helping healthcare workers put on and take off their gear. So, please tell me how this woman was able to get ebola with this type of contact? She was not handling dead bodies or sick individuals.

This is what worries me. I think the transmission is not as difficult as some are wanting us to believe. The sweat-to-skin transmission route seems likely...and that could be in any number of casual situations.

I am going to be watching this Dallas case very very closely...

Posted by: KJG at September 30, 2014 07:32 PM (ZR1pr)

33 The other thing about the Ebola Rendon strain was that it was specifically primate-to-primate... humans can't catch that flavor.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:32 PM (cxomr)

34 thanks for the "all is well" reassurance Mr. Kevin Bacon however you are aware that this patient was treated and released by a Dallas hospital after developing symptoms for the ebola virus. reports are he was ill for 4 days amongst the general population before being re-admitted to hospital where he was finally diagnosed as a carrier of the ebola virus.

Posted by: Wing_attack_Plan_R at September 30, 2014 07:33 PM (iave7)

35 I will point out that there is an epidemic of Hand Foot and Mouth disease in the school system... especially Day Cares. We never had this when I was a kid... but it happens pretty often now. "HFMD is highly contagious and is transmitted by nasopharyngeal secretions such as saliva or nasal mucus, by direct contact, or by fecal-oral transmission." Which sounds to me a LOT like how Ebola is spread.... And as I said... its all over Day Cares..

Posted by: Romeo13 at September 30, 2014 07:35 PM (f0pWu)

36 tmi3rd -- I'm not terrified. I don't do "terrified." Nothing's ever terrified me in my life. Except for the vagina. I'm just trying to understand the difference between contagious and transmittable.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 07:35 PM (MDgS8)

37 KJG, she was handling contaminated gear. She wasn't trained to make sure she didn't touch her face, and what may have happened is that she did something like wipe her mouth or rub her eye with a contaminated glove. Unless everyone I know in infectious disease is flat-out lying to me, it's not going to get in through your skin; the skin is constructed in a way that that doesn't happen.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:37 PM (cxomr)

38 Eleven, sounds good. Contagious describes the ability of a disease to go from human to human. Transmissibility describes the ease by which it's passed. Most viruses (colds, influenza) are extremely contagious and only require a few particles to get you sick- that partially defines transmissibility. Ebola is equally contagious, but requires more particles to get you sick- making it less transmissible. It's also more fragile outside the host than your average cold or flu virus, and that also reduces its transmissibility. Does that clear it up? It's an annoying part of the semantics of the profession, and I apologize for not delineating it more clearly earlier.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:42 PM (cxomr)

39 Eleven, sounds good. Contagious describes the ability of a disease to go from human to human. Transmissibility describes the ease by which it's passed. Most viruses (colds, influenza) are extremely contagious and only require a few particles to get you sick- that partially defines transmissibility. Ebola is equally contagious, but requires more particles to get you sick- making it less transmissible. It's also more fragile outside the host than your average cold or flu virus, and that also reduces its transmissibility. Does that clear it up? It's an annoying part of the semantics of the profession, and I apologize for not delineating it more clearly earlier.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:42 PM (cxomr)

40 And somehow I managed to double post my response to eleven.

Posted by: tmi3rd at September 30, 2014 07:42 PM (cxomr)

41 18 I live not far from Dallas' Presbyterian Hospital and my eyes and butt are bleeding. I should be okay, right? Posted by: Brandon Michael the Hobbit at October 01, 2014 12:20 AM (oWhIO) ********** What is your exact location?

Posted by: Skynet-- with the MOPP Level4 Suits at September 30, 2014 07:43 PM (RJMhd)

42 I guess we will know for sure in a few weeks.

Posted by: Lori at September 30, 2014 07:47 PM (MQEz6)

43 News flash from obanma's CDC. Ebola is just a scary bug. Wash your hands, don't eat contaminated protective clothing, having sex with a Ebola infected person may be dangerous, however we are researching for possible options, as we did with HIV. There is no truth to the rumor that illegal aliens are entering our country infected with deadly diseases.

Posted by: Buffalobob at September 30, 2014 07:49 PM (AKM2n)

44 I have found this type of information referenced in a few places...sounds like skin-to-skin contact with sweat:

"It can spread through direct skin to skin contact: One major reason why healthcare workers and immediate family members of infected Ebola victims were falling prey to the same in the infected areas is due to direct skin to skin contact with the patients. This is because the virus can be easily transmitted through an exchange of bodily fluids like sweat, saliva, etc. However, remember the virus would not spread only through casual contact. There has to be a medium for the transmission to take place and in case of a skin-to-skin contact it is either sweat, saliva, blood or other body fluids."

Posted by: KJG at September 30, 2014 07:50 PM (ZR1pr)

45 Unless you have dry cracked skin from constantly washing your hands. EBOLA will survive up to Six months in sperm, even after you are cured, This from an Infectious Dr

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at September 30, 2014 07:50 PM (b6koZ)

46 Another...Infectious disease specialist:

Ebola is contracted through saliva, semen and blood. "It's spread through any bodily secretions that you can touch," Dr Khalil said. "It can go through the skin."

http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2014/08/5_things_you_need_to_know_abou.html

Posted by: KJG at September 30, 2014 07:53 PM (ZR1pr)

47 @33 The other thing about the Ebola Rendon strain was that it was specifically primate-to-primate... humans can't catch that flavor. Yea right Unless they're banging or eating primates. @39 Ebola is equally contagious, but requires more particles to get you sick- making it less transmissible. It's also more fragile outside the host than your average cold or flu virus, and that also reduces its transmissibility. Isn't that what they told us about AIDS?

Posted by: Buffalobob at September 30, 2014 07:56 PM (AKM2n)

48 Unless everyone I know in infectious disease is flat-out lying to me, it's not going to get in through your skin; the skin is constructed in a way that that doesn't happen.


They don't have to be lying - they need only to be wrong. Aids is a lot harder to spread than Ebola - I think we all can agree with that statement. Is there an Aids epidemic?

Posted by: [/i] [/b] [/s] [/u] An Observation at September 30, 2014 07:57 PM (ylhEn)

49 They don't have to be lying - they need only to be wrong. Aids is a lot harder to spread than Ebola - I think we all can agree with that statement. Is there an Aids epidemic? Posted by: An Observation at October 01, 2014 12:57 AM (ylhEn) One of the reasons Aids continues to be a problem is that you can have the virus, for a LONG time, and not know it. Ebola is pretty quick acting... you'll know within days if you have it or not...

Posted by: Romeo13 at September 30, 2014 08:01 PM (f0pWu)

50 tmi3rd -- I appreciate ya. And we all just got thred stomped.

Posted by: eleven at September 30, 2014 08:02 PM (MDgS8)

51 Here is some good info on droplets and how far they can travel. http://tinyurl.com/p8xwwyo

Posted by: Patrick From Ohio at September 30, 2014 08:06 PM (b6koZ)

52 Thank you tmi3rd. This was a great post.

Posted by: Emily at September 30, 2014 08:06 PM (7Rn+/)

53 Hey, you know how the flu doesnt reallt spread around? Its like that. Good talk folks.

Posted by: mb at September 30, 2014 08:40 PM (7XD4F)

54 "Equally important- and I want to emphasize this- Ebola can only be spread human-to-human AFTER SYMPTOMS BEGIN" Hahahahaha!!! NO every strain of every virus has a slightly different window of transmissibility. I highly recommend the book "Spillover" by David Quamman These kind of broad statements are obviously bullshit and should be treated with extreme skepticism.

Posted by: THAT ANNOYING GUY WHO CAN'T OPEN COMMENTS AT WORK at September 30, 2014 08:43 PM (QCc6B)

55 Be very skeptical of people who claim every strain of Ebola acts the same and spreads the same way. (They are probably more right than not, but you should still be very skeptical)

Posted by: THAT ANNOYING GUY WHO CAN'T OPEN COMMENTS AT WORK at September 30, 2014 08:52 PM (QCc6B)

56 Be very skeptical of people who claim every strain of Ebola acts the same and spreads the same way. (They are probably more right than not, but you should still be very skeptical)

Posted by: THAT ANNOYING GUY WHO CAN'T OPEN COMMENTS AT WORK at September 30, 2014 08:52 PM (QCc6B)

57 WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE!!! (sooner or later)

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at September 30, 2014 08:53 PM (h53OH)

58 tmi3rd: "Basic cleaning- if it's done- will handle it." Keyword: IF And that's a problem. A non-symptomatic vector walking around coughing/wiping exudates of whatever consistency is like planting little time bombs everywhere. And what public space is going to have hazmat teams wiping down high-contact surfaces constantly? Hospital? Probably but not guaranteed. Anywhere else? Nope. OK, it's not transmissible like the flu because EBOV aerosols may not carry a high enough viral count to induce disease, but it's hardy enough to survive on organic and inorganic surfaces in a viable state. I'll maintain a safe level of paranoia and panic just to be sure. As to warnings/guides from the government? I'll retain a level of paranoia about them, too. They've earned the mistrust.

Posted by: AnonymousDrivel at September 30, 2014 11:36 PM (1CroS)

59 Isn't double-posting an early sign of Ebola?

Posted by: AnonymousDrivel at September 30, 2014 11:39 PM (1CroS)

60 Planeloads of infected immigrants brought here in the name of diversity and distributed to the 57 states by Eric the Red would be a nice finishing touch for him.

Posted by: torabora at October 01, 2014 12:21 AM (PUb/w)

61 You mean like when those 3,000 soldiers run out of PPE and some ring knocker orders them into a hot zone anyway?

Posted by: A pot of message at October 01, 2014 01:08 AM (LORBg)

62 Thanks for the post, but a pet-peeve of mine is when people tell me to stop panicking when I'm not panicking. And I don't think people here are panicking. The reasons people are concerned are: 1. This time the outbreak is lasting a lot longer than previous ones. 2. Health care workers who are supposedly following procedures are getting infected. 3. Health officials seem to be cavalier about the whole thing. 4. The government is lead by a bunch of incompetents. Items #1 and #2 hint that something may be different this time and more caution is required. Regarding #3, people like their public health officials to be reasonably paranoid. They bring over two people from Africa in a sealed airplane and put them in a class whatever facility. Yet some guy gets into the country with it on a commercial flight, roams around the country for awhile, and it's just fine and dandy since he is in a typical isolation ward.

Posted by: Better Feared than Loved at October 01, 2014 01:28 AM (jasFi)

63 tmi3rd, I took the EMT-to-MD route twenty years ago or so. Deja vu. Email if you want advice.

As far as Ebola, there are so many other deadly things you can catch in a hospital it's hard to imagine. Hospitals are where sick people go. (I know - I've spent too much of the past twenty years in them.) Cleaning is kind of a fetish there, government or no.

We have low levels of various viral hemorrhagic fevers running around the USA pretty much all the time. In the desert Southwest, for example, we have Hantavirus, which really is spread via the respiratory route. Fortunately, it's spread <i>from rodents to humans</i> via that route, and the supply of infected mice in hospitals is low.

This one was imported. If we start having actual transmission in the States, and if the numbers start to climb out of the single digits, then yes, it's time to worry more. For now, I'm pretty sure that flu is going to kill more people than Ebola in the US this year.

Posted by: Deniable Sources at October 01, 2014 01:41 AM (/Bq5s)

64 I missed this post last night. Thanks tmi3rd. I'm not panicking, I'm paranoid. Since pretty much every "that could never happen here" scenario has happened here ubder O, I think being paranoid is healthy.

Posted by: @votermom at October 01, 2014 01:46 AM (cbfNE)

65 Hey tmi & other MDs: do antibacterial hand sanitizers have any effect on surfaces against viruses? Or are they useless?

Posted by: @votermom at October 01, 2014 01:55 AM (cbfNE)

66 Hey, votermom, I'm no MD, but I think so -- just like it kills cold viruses. (However, do not resort to drinking hand sanitizer once symptoms start -- go straight to Glenfiddich). I know the CDC uses plain Lysol showers to decontaminate their hazmat suits. That ad about "kills 99.9% of household germs" is accurate.

Posted by: Rev at October 01, 2014 02:28 AM (Vh+W5)

67 Dallas patient zero started experiencing symptoms on the 22nd, not the 24 th He went to the ER and was sent home So he and his family were NOT quarantined He returned to the hospital by ambulance on the 28th That is when he was quarantined Yesterday, the 30th, officials said they started quarantining his family and contacts The 22nd to the 28 th not quarantined

Posted by: ThunderB at October 01, 2014 02:29 AM (zOTsN)

68 I've just read spillover and read the hot zone many years ago. What is scaring me is all the officials telling everyone not to panic. People should be extremely cautious! I think all the don't worry folks stuff from last month has convinced people this is not highly infectious. It is. It spreads through body fluids and when you are sick you spread the everywhere.

Posted by: Lea at October 01, 2014 02:29 AM (/bd0t)

69 Wait, is infectious the same as contagious, or am I thinking of tranmissible? Transmittable? Getting panicky here.

Posted by: Rev at October 01, 2014 02:35 AM (Vh+W5)

70 Stay calm and find a thesaurus.

Posted by: Rev at October 01, 2014 02:35 AM (Vh+W5)

71 Not easily transmissable before when warnings were "Don't eat fruit bat in the Congo." Now it's in Dallas. This was predictable, or else they wouldn't have flown in those retards a couple months ago. They were just breaking the news and preparing us for the inevitable.

Posted by: Tattoo De Plane at October 01, 2014 03:48 AM (Y92Nd)

72 First look up what Bio Safety Level 4 requirements are in Wikipedia. Then understand that Ebola can only be studied in labs meeting these levels. There are reasons for this - reasons which involve keeping the virus from spreading.

Hospitals can't possibly reach BSL-4 from ambulance to isolation wards.

Either the BSL-4 level containment is necessary - or it is not.

The claim that skin contact is not enough for spread - exactly how was that established? Did multiple researchers volunteer to be test subjects? Maybe they infected some prisoners? Perhaps they used a village in Africa as test subjects? Where is the paper on however the claim was established? How many samples were run to establish that to a 95% confidence level?

Or is that claim just bullshit wishful thinking / propaganda?

Posted by: [/i] [/b] [/s] [/u] An Observation at October 01, 2014 04:34 AM (ylhEn)

73 We are a little over 3 months away from 1.4 million being infected worldwide. Wait to panic until then?

Posted by: Frogbite at October 01, 2014 04:52 AM (hZsPy)

74 "(we've never actually cured a virus in human history), " Um, Hep C?

Posted by: Jerome at October 01, 2014 04:53 AM (ZcCFT)

75 Personally, I'd feel much better about all this if we knew why the folks like Dr Brantly came down with the disease. He was treating ebola patients and knows how to prevent contamination. So, why does the public not know how he caught it?

Posted by: Iron Mike Golf at October 01, 2014 05:15 AM (di1hb)

76 72,

BSL-4 is normal for laboratory investigations of readily-transmissible live virus where the virus is as lethal as Ebola. Remember that test procedures can aerosolize the virus and, especially where animals are concerned, can have unpredictable sequences of events.

Hospitals don't need to reach BSL-4 to prevent the spread of Ebola. Heck, they don't need to reach those levels to prevent the spread of really, really, easily transmissible stuff like measles or varicella.

As far as how it was established that the virus is spread through fluids but not the respiratory route, the pace of the epidemic itself tells you everything to need to know. An effectively airborne virus with that lethality would rip through a city like Lagos in days. The fact that most Ebola outbreaks in the jungle were self-limited and did NOT wipe out whole regions makes it unlikely that Ebola is easy to transmit. It's just not impossible, and ignorance (both patients and providers), fear, and corruption make urban Africa a frighteningly good stewpot for it.

Oh, and Lysol (and other alcohol-based sanitizers)? Good stuff. So is lots of soap and water. Viruses don't really appreciate either.

Posted by: Deniable Sources at October 01, 2014 05:19 AM (/Bq5s)

77 This is all bilge. Ebola is going to go through us like an aging coke whore going through a small inherited fortune. The time to panic was *before* Obama sent half the US Army to Sierra Leone with zero training and orders to "just grab all the zombies!". We are doomed. We're all gonna die. You heard it here first.

Posted by: Jerome at October 01, 2014 05:29 AM (ZcCFT)

78 The idea that the Ebola virus cannot enter the body through the skin is downright ludicrous.  Any scrape or cut is an open door.

'Preciate the effort, tmi3rd, but I'll keep right on panicking. 

Posted by: creeper at October 01, 2014 05:30 AM (iH1nq)

79 Leaking blood at every orifice, a deadly menace to everyone you touch or come near. Of course, you knew all that already. What they haven't told you about is the pain! Oh, god, the PAIN! Be very afraid, now!

Posted by: Jerome at October 01, 2014 05:34 AM (ZcCFT)

80 So we're really not going to know a thing for at least another six days if patient #2 is going to pop out of the woodwork.

Posted by: Hudson at October 01, 2014 06:11 AM (QBJ9l)

81 I walked down around the bend on my property yesterday and Ray Walston was sitting there painting.  Is that a bad sign?

Posted by: richard mcenroe at October 01, 2014 06:37 AM (XO6WW)

82 They now have a possible second victim in Dallas..... http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/10/01/texas-ebola-patient/16525649/

Posted by: AliLaurelHabs at October 01, 2014 07:30 AM (N8qv9)

83

@62 The problem there is that "they" didn't just bring in two patients.  The pilot of the private carrier hired by whatever .gov agency said that he had brought upwards of 20 passengers who were quarrentined in his aircraft back to the US.

And being asked to believe anything coming out of the CDC(or as Dr. Savage calls it, the CDS - communicable diease spreaders) pretty much requires one to suspend any rational thought (or be a lib/prog - BIRM).

Posted by: emdfl at October 01, 2014 12:32 PM (OVzOY)

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